28

The OP linked 4 videos, the first 2 videos were long-course Ironman races, where time trial (TT) bikes were used, while the latter 2 videos were of short-course draft legal races where road bikes were used. In the latter two videos the competitors were either pros or elite amateurs. These individuals typically have multiple bikes and would be using a TT ...


25

Since you say you're looking to become a triathlete soon it's far too early to be thinking of advanced training aids like power meters. The first few things to do (not necessarily in this order) are join a tri club enter a triathlon or two join a tri training squad observe your (comparative) strengths and weaknesses get a well recommended triathlon book. ...


24

Almost all amateur triathlons are DRAFT ILLEGAL. This was originally because triathlon famously has its roots in finding out "who the best athlete is" (Ironman, specifically, was founded by a group of friends who each specialized the different sports, and each thought that their sport was the "hardest"). In that context, drafting was/is seen as taking ...


14

To crudely simplify things, a triathlon/TT bike position is much the same as a road position, but basically "rotated forward", so your arms rest atop the very-low-set bars. A consequence of this is, the seat ends up further forward. (source) Using Chris Froome's TT position as an example, noting the hip position versus the bottom-bracket position: (source ...


13

They are very similar but have to follow different certification rules. For example, under UCI regulations the saddle of a TT bike must be at least 5 cm behind a vertical line drawn through the bottom bracket (cf. Rules 1.3.011 to 1.3.025), there are constraints on the size, shape, and orientation of frame members, and so on. Triathlon bikes are certified ...


9

I think most people find the bike-to-run transition quite difficult while the legs adjust from going in a circular motion to running. Particularly for longer distance courses. Here's an interesting article from a renowned triathlon athlete/coach: http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblog/2007/01/cleat-position.html The article discusses the merits of putting ...


8

Triathlon bikes are about one thing, and one thing only. Aerodynamics. Dan Empfield, the creator of the Quintana Roo brand, recognized this early on. Cervelo came along soon after, and their designs basically changed how time trial bikes are viewed, with their breakthrough design of the P3 in 2001 (Company history here.) This P3 design evolved, and there ...


8

They do help with training and racing but they are also very expensive. As you say you are a beginner I imagine increases in fitness/strength (and therefore speed) are going to come fast anyway, even without a power readout to base training around. I would definitely invest in a HRM though and make sure the bike computer you use has cadence as well as speed....


7

You've exceeded the manufacturer's recommendation on saddle positioning -- the clamp is supposed to clamp on the saddle between the stop lines. So, the saddle should be moved back. Many people exceed these recommendations, but its at your own risk. I'd be less inclined to do it on a lightweight or fancy saddle. The easiest way to move the saddle forward is ...


7

In your first tri , you’ll have all sorts of new things to concentrate on, I don’t think an unusual bike should be one of them. When I’ve seen people ride road bikes for the first time, it’s the gear shifting that’s often trickier and more distracting than anything else. I’ve seen people take more than one ride to get the muscle memory to change gear in ...


7

Triathlon and time trial bikes are quite expensive and not wonderful to ride on open courses, hills, and in groups (in other words, general cycling). So, if you're not so serious about triathlons that you're willing to spend several thousand dollars on a bike that will see relatively little use, you'll likely be content with your existing road bike whose ...


6

From what I've read, adding a power meter betters measuring HR only, for some reasons: Heat, diet and stress can affect your HR. A low HR might be an indicator that you are in good shape. You can have a high HR and your power output be low An increase in power implies better performance, but an increase in HR does not necessarily. So it is good to combine ...


6

You probably don't want to spring for a specific time trial bike straight out of the gate - you might hate the triathlon experience, for one thing! Given that you're planning on using the bike after this events, albeit possibly with other events down the pipe, I'd be looking for something that you can get the best use of after the event. So a road bike ...


5

Budget advice Visit/Join a Tri Club and check out what second-hand bikes the members are selling. Aim for the low end, say less than $1000. Make sure you ride a few different bikes so that you can compare. It needs to be comfortable and fit well. It must have quick-release wheels. Also, work out what shoes and pedals you are comfortable using: will you ...


5

Looking at your times, your times on the bike leg are below the levels you are setting in the other legs. But given that you are barely training for the bike leg, your times are pretty good. This site says How long does it take to finish a Half Ironman Triathlon? The answer, based on our analysis of more than 67,000 finishers in 40 Half Ironman ...


4

Proper fit in an aerobar posture is designed to allow you to race well. In order to race well you will need to be comfortable enough to produce power, to reduce aerodynamic drag, and to handle the bike well and safely for the duration of your race. If your fit otherwise meets all your needs, you shouldn't be concerned about where your knee is positioned ...


4

I can't tell for sure what's going on in that picture, but I think it's a modified older Vision lever that clamps on the OD rather than inside the bars, and then the shifter is just stuck out the end. Ways of doing it with off the shelf parts that I know of are the Jtek Aerobrake, Ultegra ST-6871 and DA ST-9071, the Record and Athena tri/tt EPS levers, and ...


3

No. Based on your question and your comments, there is not a product that does what you are seeking (get your hips over the bottom bracket). The reason being that no one rides that far forward.1 The old style Profile is probably your best bet for getting forward: There are designs with a seat over the bottom bracket, even some that are made super-adjustable ...


3

Even if your local triathlon is not USAT certified, it's likely that they follow the same general rules. The only way to be sure is to ask the race director (if they haven't already published their rules). USAT's Competitive Rules clearly prohibit drafting: 5.10 Position Fouls. In accordance with the Rules as set forth in this section, a participant is ...


3

There are many factors to consider. Without being able to be scientific about it, people do evolve a natural pedal technique and I don't see the point in trying to radically change it, rather you should first have your bike fit and set up performed properly, and then allow your own natural style to evolve. There have been major cycling champions that were ...


3

I have been considering this question lately. Here's my input... I understand that 650 wheels have advantages because: Less weight, less inertia. The less weight there is the easier it is for the wheel to accelerate, turn and climb. I understand that 650 wheels have dis-advantages because: Less popular than 700 & 26" with retailers, so potentially ...


3

What you want are satellite shifters or the TT shifters. I believe they just plug into the standard brake/shifters.


3

To get faster times, your options are: Accelerate faster Cruise faster Decelerate faster To accelerate faster, reduce rotating weight and increase bike & component stiffness. Reducing non-rotating component weight will not have much effect unless your races involve a lot of climbing, especially as lighter components are usually less stiff unless you're ...


3

Except for wheels, upgrading bike components of increased performance is not beneficial. You are the engine and only training will provide noticeable results. if you are riding less than 3K miles/year 105 is good enough. My recommendations: Interval training https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_training sweet spot training https://fascatcoaching.com/tips/...


3

Yes, of course, that's possible. You just plug the cables into the brifters. Peel the grip-covers forward and you'll see unused ports underneath. Those may be used for sprinter buttons or for climber buttons as well. But I'd suggest you replace a triple box by a quintuple box (Shimano SM-EW90-B 5 Port Di2 Junction A) to make the connection easier without ...


3

Almost all derailleurs are pulled by cables. To be able to operate one derailleur from either of two shifters, or one brake from two levers, you'll need some mechanism to split the cable. As always, while Stack Exchange usually asks us not to recommend products, I can't answer this question without mentioning some particular products. These aren't ...


2

In addition to aerodynamics, not yet mentioned is the benefit to your running off the bike. By changing the seat angle, you use your muscles differently and can run faster off the bike than a more traditional seat post angle. As noted in this article, test subjects were about 5 minutes faster in a 40k/10k Brick (stationary bike/treadmill run). There was ...


2

I did a MTB relay last year, and got 30 minutes riding followed by 2 hours of downtime. You need to warm up for 10 to 15 minutes before your turn. Some time on a training bike is good, even doing short 400m circuit laps off the official track, or on a spare bike on rollers. Jogging and stretching is a poor second to a bike warmup, but its better than ...


2

The manufacturer has uploaded a video for the E114 stating that it is a triathlon bike. Argon18 Video on youtube.


2

I ride my bikes HARD (BMX park/street/dirt) and back in the 90s we had to use what ever parts we could find. Since no one was making parts back then for BMX, it was usually MTB parts. Even back then and with all the abuse we put them through, (yes, even flipping seats and posts backwards to fit our needs) the parts seemed to hold up pretty well (Except the ...


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