48

If you value your time at US\$20 an hour or higher, you’ll find you’ll quickly benefit by just getting a spare set of wheels, leaving the tires permanently mounted, and swapping wheel sets as needed. Otherwise, you have to clean sealant from the tubeless rims which make them a pain and buying a new bottle of sealant every now and again is going to start ...


29

It is an increasingly common practice for manufacturers to add tire wear indicators, which are little divots like the ones on your tire. Otherwise, there is no objective measure of when to change a tire apart from your mileage log (and riders of different weights should be expected to wear out tires at different rates). Basically, once you can no longer see ...


26

While your question of identifying a tubeless tyre has been answered, I think that might not actually be what you have to worry about. A bike might come with tubeless tyres, but that doesn't mean that they're set up tubeless. The tyres might still have a tube in them, so your concern should be identifying whether there's a tube inside or not. The easiest way ...


23

It’s an intentional wear indicator. There should be “TWI” (Tread Wear Indicator) and a small arrow printed on the sidewall where the dimple is. When the dimple is no longer visible your tread is almost gone and it’s about time to replace the tire.


21

You are correct that the type of puncture you're getting is caused by the rim "pinching" the inner tube. The root cause here is one of the following: pressure too low (most likely) You're not avoiding potholes carefully enough Weight is too high for the tires/terrain. This has nothing to do with fixies except perhaps that people on fixies tend to ...


15

When putting tubeless tyres on I would definitely recommend that you use a sealant such as Stan's if riding somewhere with thorns. This would be your first level of defence. The sealant would seal up a thorn (or other) hole quickly and painlessly. You can repair a tubeless tyre with a vulcanizing repair kit, but reseating a tubeless on the trail is very ...


14

I have changed a number of tubeless tires now and the other answers are on point that generally this should be avoided, and if possible run either more than one wheel set, choose a more general setup, or stick with tubes if you need to change tires frequently. The initial tubeless tire setup can go quickly if you have the right tools and a bit of practice, ...


13

Inflator heads with Presta fittings let you do this because they tend to (always?) seal down around the stem, not the core. I don't know any other way. I suppose you could also take a spare Presta core from a dead tube, break the plunger out of it to get more airflow, then temporarily install it in your tubeless valves and put your adapter on that. This is ...


12

I've been waiting until I had enough time to give this a proper answer, because the answer to the question in the title is "it depends" and it's a very important "it depends." It runs the gamut from yes to absolutely not. I want to cover road bike tires here as well, as I don't want folks making the jump from "it's ok for mountain bikes" to "it's ok for road ...


12

At minimum, you should replace the sealant every 6 months or so. As you have found, a good tubeless setup will stay inflated well beyond that time, as the latex in the sealant has already sealed any small holes. However, the sealant does dry over time, so the systems ability to self-repair when you run over a thorn or sharp rock is greatly reduced. There ...


12

The debate of Presta or Schrader is mostly religious and often based on poorly misunderstood facts or historical differences. Rim Width. In the 21st century, the problem is less about the strength of the rim and more to do with fitting the tire beads and valve into a narrow rim. If the rim is wide enough to accept a Schrader and mount the tire, its strong ...


12

Pull the valve core and poke a 2mm Allen wrench down to test the fluid level with the valve at the 6 o'clock position with the tire off the ground. You want "some" free liquid. How much depends on the tire size but I usually look for at least 3mm. Some amount of sealant from a new installation goes to coating the tire and in many cases filling in the ...


12

It seems like there is a problem with the rim tape. The tape should seal the spoke holes without milk. Try cleaning the rim and replacing the tape if it is still loosing pressure.


11

Tubeless sealant has the consistency of roughly soy milk. If you take a tubeless wheel and shake it, you should hear the sealant sloshing around (and if you don't, chances are it's time to add sealant). You need to have liquid sealant to help seal punctures; if its solid and dried out, it won't be mobile. Will you hear it when riding? No. There are far ...


11

Modern tubeless bicycle tires require a sealant to be added to the inside of the tire. If a small leak develops the sealant seeps out, meets air, solidifies and seals the leak. I believe this arrangement has become popular because earlier tubeless standards like UST required heavier tires. The white foam dots you see is the tubeless tire sealant leaking ...


10

You're really asking two questions here: 1) Do road tires lose air more quickly? And 2) Do tubeless tires lose air more quickly? First off, let's talk about the different ways that tires can (and do) lose pressure. Obviously, they can lose pressure through a poor seal, either on the valve or where the tire seats to the rim on tubeless tires. Tires also ...


10

Yes - take off the tire and the tubeless valve, clean up the rim, put on some new rim tape and then install a tube + tire. If you're running tubeless and you have a failure, you can always just pop a tube in and continue your ride. And tubeless has its advantages (lower pressures since you can avoid pinch flats), so you may want to embrace it.


10

I don't think I'd want to be taking off tubeless tire set up as tubeless with sealant once a month then reinstalling then later. You could run the wider tubeless tires with tubes in them to make the swap easier. Or go for a dual purpose tubeless 38mm tire with a low profile tread.


10

TLDR: The pressure you put into the bottle is NOT the pressure to which you inflate the tyre. The pressure drops down as the volume increases when you connect the bottle with the tyre. The final pressure you inflate your tyres to is mostly personal. There are some guidelines but depend on many details about the terrain and the tyre properties. You ask for a ...


9

I know there are a few answers here but they don't address the tonus solid or tubless. Here is you problem: I don't know exactly the amount of pressure, but always that I inflate the tires, are really "tight" you could say. "Tight" is not good enough. Check pressure without a gauge. Get a real pressure gauge. They are not expensive and inflate ...


9

I'm not sure you know what tubular tires are (they are relatively rare), but I'll describe the 3 basic tire systems for bicycles: The most common is the good old clincher tire. (Image from Wikipedia: Bicycle Tire) The tire (4=bead,6=casing,7=tread) hooks into the rim (1) via the bead (4). The air is held through an inner tube (5) which is protected from ...


9

Look at the tire sidewall for model/name, tubeless tires usually have TL, UST, TR or Tubeless in it; some tires don't (like Schwalbe Pro One), so google the model and see if it's tubeless or not. Keep in mind that some MTB tires can be setup tubeless regardless of what manufacturer claims, in this case you can unseat some tire bead and check if there's tube ...


9

What if the puncture is not adequately sealed by the sealant? Can I patch a tubeless tyre in a permanent way with a glue-type patch? A permanent repair without a slow leak for inner tubes is easiest when you always carry one spare tube so that you let the glue dry before using the newly patched tube. Unless some major form of technology breakthrough has ...


9

I'll cover some of the potential advantages by discipline, since the original question didn't state a specific discipline or disciplines. I'll address both advantages and disadvantages. Off tarmac: MTB, gravel In these scenarios, the advantages of tubeless seem very well accepted. You are more likely to encounter puncture and pinch flat hazards on short ...


8

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work (the ...


8

Sorry to revive an old thread, but I have the same wheelset. At first, I was losing up to half the pressure withing 12 hours. I started with 1 ounce of sealant in each tire. After a week, I added another ounce, and the tires lost maybe the same amount over a 24 hour period. Not bad, that is the rate for my latex tubulars But lately, the front tire is now ...


8

Bald-ness isn't a problem on tires used on roads. In fact, it's favorable. I'd replace the tire once I start getting flats (or a bit before), or seeing canvas. The primary advantage of tubeless would let you run lower pressures (since you can't pinch flat a tube if it isn't there) which is useful for running big tires while mountain biking for more grip ...


8

Sounds like you are running your tire pressures WAY too low or high. If you are experiencing tire failures due to "larger ruptures/slashes" that's indicative of a pressure issue. If too low, and you hit a root/rock too hard, the tire will deform too much and you'll strike rim, thus compressing the inside of the tire against a sharp surface and/or fold back ...


8

I'll attempt to offer a bit more nuance than the other answers. On road bikes, the downside of a poor tubeless fit is that the tire could burp, i.e. you hit something and the bead comes loose from the rim momentarily, while you're at high speed. Given the high pressures involved, a burp could mean that you lose a lot of pressure instantly. This would mean a ...


7

There are tubeless tire boots available that you can use to patch a puncture that sealant won't seal. Really, you can use the standard vulcanizing tube patch kit as well and it's cheaper. Just don't use the glueless type- they barely fix a tube, let alone a tire. Fixing a tubeless puncture that won't seal is an at home operation, though. You have to clean ...


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