New answers tagged

1

It's not strictly necessary. In the early days of tubeless, one might have run a Stan's rim with whatever tire, and the resulting combination would be much like what you propose. But, then and now, the quality and trustworthiness of the bead lock will be whatever you get. It might burp, and will likely be able to under the right circumstances. It will likely ...


5

In general: It is beter to have tubeless ready (TLR) tyres, but the large volume MTB tyres often work well even when not explicitly TLR. It is much less sensitive than road tyres. However, it should not be a supercheap thin model, that obviously would not hold the air. Also, wired models are less likely to seal well. To your specific bike: Decathlon does ...


3

Tubeless-ready rims have "shoulders" on the bed. These hold the tire bead against the sidewall. source As the comparison of rim profiles shows, you can have a tubeless rim without hooks--which you need with tubed tires--and this suggests an important difference: Tubed tires are held on at the top of the rim sidewall by the hooks, but tubeless ...


1

Came across this thread trying to solve my own problem and thought I'd post my solution. I had foam coming out EVERYWHERE around my tire (Conti 5000TL). I had taken it off another wheel, let it sit without cleaning out the (Panaracer) sealant like a numbskull and it hardened. I put new sealant in over the old dried film and the tire just erupted out all the ...


0

I believe they are an upgrade for the following reasons: I live in a reasonably civilised country with well-maintained roads but I get several flats a year usually. The trouble is that if a sharp object is tiny, the same thing that makes it impossible to see in time makes it more likely to puncture the tyre due to the increased pressure. I've seen (very) ...


1

In addition to everything that has already been said, don't forget that another serious advantage of tubeless tires is the weight. Loosing tubes will save you about 100 grams of each wheel and wheels are the first thing to take care of when lightening your bike. Moving parts have Moment of inertia. The further away from the axle is the weight, the more ...


0

Tubeless tires are objectively better in many aspects. Whether you care about those advantages or not is a different question. If you ride off-road or even on bad roads, you might want to reduce your tire pressure to provide for a smoother and more efficient ride, or for improved traction on loose surfaces. In such circumstances, a lower risk of pinch flats ...


9

I'll cover some of the potential advantages by discipline, since the original question didn't state a specific discipline or disciplines. I'll address both advantages and disadvantages. Off tarmac: MTB, gravel In these scenarios, the advantages of tubeless seem very well accepted. You are more likely to encounter puncture and pinch flat hazards on short ...


5

Mountain biking is specifically riding over terrain full of "sharp objects". MTB tires often die because of sidewall damage or because the tread blocks have worn down so much they've lost their "bite", which happens way before the tire carcass wears down to the fabric plies. As for pinch flats, tubeless tires give you the ability to ...


9

What if the puncture is not adequately sealed by the sealant? Can I patch a tubeless tyre in a permanent way with a glue-type patch? A permanent repair without a slow leak for inner tubes is easiest when you always carry one spare tube so that you let the glue dry before using the newly patched tube. Unless some major form of technology breakthrough has ...


7

Yes you can patch larger holes that the sealant can't seal on its own using "bacon strips" and a reaming tool (linked video is a Muc-off one, but there are loads of different brands of bacon strips out there). It's basically a rubberised plug which gets inserted folded using the reaming tool, which then allows the sealant to do its job. On the odd ...


5

They are marginally harder to mount (slightly tighter fit). If you struggle with the non-TL, you will struggle with the TL more, whether this extra struggle means you won't be able to mount it, depends on you and your rim. If you get enough practice you will learn little tips and tricks for mounting tubless types. Such as: Make sure it's seating in the rim ...


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