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19

The 6.8 kg limit is due to UCI regulation 1.3.019, which you can find here, and thus applies to all races sanctioned by the UCI. It was originally instituted in 2000 in order to ensure that manufacturers didn't produce racing bikes that risked structural integrity, to promote rider safety. At the time, with the then-current technology, that was considered a ...


16

This seems like a pretty good history of the circumstances around the UCI's banning of the recumbent. Your guess seems to be about right: recumbents were perceived as too weird. It's interesting to note that Faure had been racing on recumbents with success and official imprimatur for a while before they were banned. According to that article, there were ...


12

this is Nick the owner of TriRig and the designer of the brake. Short answer: yes, Omega X has been allowed to race in all stripes of UCI events, up to and including multiple appearances in the Tour de France. So generally, it appears it has been ruled legal. Of course, there is some level of unpredictability in how any given commissaire will rule on any ...


11

There are a number of factors that come into it. The weird factor is a major one. Cycling is a sport with a lot of history and tradition which many want to preserve. There are many technological innovations which could improve the performance of cyclists, but they each take it one step further away from the roots of the sport. You see examples of this, just ...


10

As far as assisting at race pace - a cadence of 90 or 100 is not a limit for an electric motor designed for it. With the dollars involved in cycling generally, and at elite sports specifically, I do not see any barrier from an electromechanical perspective. Most importantly for an elite rider, the motor can be optimised for a cadence between 85-95 - a very ...


7

The association is based on where the license holder of the team is located. Garmin Sharp is listed as USA since they are based in the US. Omega-Pharma (OPQS) has their license held by Esperanza bvba, which is based out of Belgium so the team is listed as being from Belgium, etc.


7

I assume your concern is the cover which exists solely to make the brake body more aerodynamic and thus would appear to potentially fall foul of the "no non-structural fairings" rule. Fortunately for you, brakes get an explicit exemption in the rules. Per UCI's clarification guide: The addition of a cover to a braking system ... is authorised. The ...


4

First of all: unfaired recumbents and faired recumbents racing are two different classes currently and adding unfaired recumbents would be far from as dramatic as faired ones. (An unfaired recumbent compares to a TT bike, like a TT bike compares to a roadbike basically, while a faired one is much faster) While I agree with most of the answers above, the ...


4

The hour record for a recumbent faired bike is somewhere at the 90 kilometers. Meanwhile, the hour record on a "normal" bike is somewhere at the 54 km. Faired recumbent bikes will smoke any other kind of bike on flat stages, and wind from the front will make the difference even greater. Meanwhile, side wind which would be uncomfortable for a normal race bike ...


4

the Recumbent bikes have their own federation/competition https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recumbent_bicycle I guess the UCI reasoning is to find out who is the best athlete using the approved bicycle. Everybody has the same bike and the only difference is the runner. IHPVA on the other hand put not limit on the bike and the goal is to find out which couple ...


3

The motor doesn’t have to contribute to upper limit riding. Click the motor on and spend the first half of the race freewheeling at 200W and save your legs. Throw in a change of bike then you can save weight for when you need it. The focus seems to be on GC riders using this technology for direct benefit, but the GC rider could benefit from having a ...


2

For the UCI WorldTour the nationality doesn't matter too much, there the choice is made by the location of the comany behind it. Which does this with facors like where are the offices what taxation is in the country which sponsors can they attract from that country (regitering in Cuba might be nice but you get no U.S.-based sponsors ;-) etc.) Emplyoment ...


2

These are quite high-profile events. I think you do need a license, C1 and C2 are pro categories. From a random website: What does UCI, C1 and C2 mean? That means some of the world’s best cyclocross racers will be right here in Rochester racing at the Rochester Cyclocross in Genesee Valley Park! Including a bunch of current and past national ...


1

I think that if you ask around, many people regard many or most of the rules set out by the Union Cycliste International (UCI, or International Cycling Union in English) to be arbitrary. While I don't follow professional racing extremely closely, I also believe that at least some of the rules are not consistently enforced from race to race. For example, this ...


1

If you do not race in a UCI race you do not care about this rule at all. If you are thirsty, you drink. The end of the trip is where you are at the greatest danger of bonking so if you feel hungry or weak, just eat or get some quick sugar. Actually, the racers can also do so, but they cannot get new food and new water, they only can use what they have. UCI ...


1

Assuming you're in the US, UCI rules on bicycles in general do not apply. Actual UCI rules only apply "at events that select 17-18, U23 and Elite riders for international competition or national teams. All bicycles used in National Championships (for UCI recognized classes listed above) and NRC races must comply with the current UCI regulations." See 1. ...


1

After andy256's comment I have looked into UCI cycling regulations. To prevent link rot, I am also adding link to the Wayback Machine. (And even if this fails, it should not be that difficult to find the file on internet.) It is mentioned there that licenses are awarded based on sporting, ethical, financial and administrative criteria. Top 16 teams in the ...


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