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31

Regulation 16 of the Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations (1989) states: Restrictions on fitting blue warning beacons, special warning lamps and similar devices No vehicle, other than an emergency vehicle, shall be fitted with– (a) a blue warning beacon or special warning lamp, or (b) a device which resembles a blue warning beacon or a ...


28

50 miles is feasible but it will be hard work. Think about how tired you felt after cycling 20 miles. Then cycle 20 miles again from that tired start and think about how tired you'll feel then. Then, cycle another ten miles. The other answers give lots of good advice which I won't repeat. Since you mention trains and coming home every week, I assume that ...


18

It's not easy. A few factors make it harder. The double yellow lines don't extend vary far up Chipperfield Road (for those not in the UK, they mean "no parking"). Cars can come up too quickly for the conditions, and taxi drivers are notoriously impatient, as well as likely to pass too close without slowing down. Seeing a hazard rolling out of ...


15

Despite what others have said, a warranty is a bona fide contract between the company and you. It's used in the selling of the product thus is covered by decent consumer protection law (in the UK anyway). This article from Which suggests a good process to follow. Keep a record of the contact with the company, try to follow their warranty procedure. If you'...


15

The 'arch' is actually an arrow - look at the right hand end. I believe it means there is a junction between the carriageways that allows you to make a right turn and travel along the opposite side. There's another sign on the other side of the carriageway, and a corresponding u-turn junction.


14

The UK Highwaycode states: Using the road: Turning left Rule 182 Use your mirrors and give a left-turn signal well before you turn left. Do not overtake just before you turn left and watch out for traffic coming up on your left before you make the turn, especially if driving a large vehicle. Cyclists, motorcyclists and other road users in ...


12

As the previous answer states, you're perfectly within your rights to continue along the cycle lane in this situation, regardless of any cars to your right. Some junctions even have advanced stop lines (see rule 178), which are explicitly designed for exactly this purpose: allowing and encouraging bicycles to pass beyond the stopped cars and position ...


10

There is really not much you can do except taking it slowly and carefully looking around. Parked vehicles (especially high ones like trucks, vans and SUVs) at intersections are always a problem and risk. At least here in Austria one mustn’t park within 5m of the edge of intersecting roads but this law is often violated. A few things which can help slightly: ...


9

It's doable if you are young and fit and don't mind some pain. If you have ridden up to 20 miles, but regularly only ride a few miles, you may find 50 miles is a struggle, just because you are not used to it. On the initial attempts plan to take it easy and build in rest stops. From your 20 mile rides you should have a good idea of the pace you can sustain. ...


8

If you opened someone's car door you could be committing either Dangerous cycling or Careless, and inconsiderate, cycling. (Road Traffic Act 1988) There's also the offence of Assault to consider. (CPS guidelines) An assault is committed when a person intentionally or recklessly causes another to apprehend the immediate infliction of unlawful force. ...


8

For the UK there are traffic statistics available. This graph from the 2015 Road Traffic Estimates shows the general trend for cars. There are detailed tables of traffic flow available. There is also geographical data available in the form an interactive map. This isn't broken down by time of day, but should give you an indication of which roads generally ...


8

They're in the highway code, but the word "must" isn't used in the online version or my paper copy from 1999, which states: Turning right 155. Well before you turn right you should Use your mirrors... Give a right turn signal A cycling-specific rule is 52 in my copy (67 in a more recent edition): 52. You should look all around before moving ...


7

I regularly ride quite long distances in the UK (SW England, Wales). For 50 miles one large bottle of water is enough for most people even in hot weather (even me and I get thirsty). However you'll probably be going slower as you're new to the distance. I suggest you plan a route that allows you to get off the bike and get something to eat/drink at around ...


7

Consider clothing as well. I commute a short distance daily and rarely do long rides, so proper shorts are not something I bother with. When I've done longer rides, I quickly noticed that as the difference. If there's a seam in the wrong place on your pants, 50 miles is going to make it known to you.


7

The standard setup is left for front and right for rear for gears. For gears you would need special left rear and right front shifters, which are not manufactured. It is very unlikely that you had those, and they converted to normal shifters during one ride, at the same time as cables rerouted themselves.


7

Take the example where a bicycle lane in on the road, rather than the pavement. There is a queue of cars waiting at the lights, and the bike lane is clear right up to the lights. If you were to cycle right up to the lights, you would be undertaking all the queuing cars on the way. Is this an example of "dangerous driving", or otherwise frowned upon ...


6

Highway code rule 163 give motorcyclists, cyclists and horse riders at least as much room as you would when overtaking a car He wouldn't overtake a car as it was turning left, so he shouldn't overtake a cyclist; 2ft is not an adequate safe margin.


6

This isn't the example situation described in the question, but it is what immediately what came to mind when I read the title, which is: Undertaking another cyclist whilst on a bicycle is in my experience extremely frowned upon, and to me (when I am the one being undertaken) feels very dangerous. My rationale for why it feels like this to me is that as ...


6

Get the junction improved! You already have some good answers for dealing with it "there and then", below is a parallel, long-term solution. Write to: the council (the borough council in London, might be called city or district council etc elsewhere) your MP (I believe you can even if you can't vote in parliamentary elections), just look up the ...


5

I'd highly recommend two courses of action. First, take a couple deep breaths and then call back the manufacturer. Without too many details to cloud the issue, and without too much emotion, explain that you believe you have a frame crack that in your estimation is from a defective weld. Play nice, if they still refuse to warranty it, ask what they can/...


5

From http://www.bikehub.co.uk/featured-articles/cycling-and-the-law/ In Scotland the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 gives everybody the right to non motorised access to most land in Scotland, including roads, tracks, and paths. So, apart from trampling over gardens or disturbing working farm-yards, you can walk, ride your bike, or ride a horse on ...


5

The vehicular and cycle traffic has priority, since the crossing is not a zebra crossing and there are no traffic lights, which are the only situations in which the Highway Code talks about pedestrians having priority. However, as you have noted, many people seem to be confused by the crossing, so you should be ready to stop in case a pedestrian does step ...


5

A year and a bit on, I'd like to answer my own question. In the UK, I've not seen anyone turned away from National Championship races for having locked off gears, and the ruling that was sent to us, wasn't necessarily implemented at the event we attended. However, if you are going to race in continental Europe (such as Assen Youth Tour, or any other race ...


5

A parked car isn't moving, so you're not overtaking it. Whether it's legal, safe, or sensible for the car to overtake you is another matter, and very heavily dependent on the circumstance. Consider a long straight road with a line of parked cars and no oncoming traffic. You take up much of your side of the road staying outside the door zone, and the car is ...


4

The light controls the stop line (and, if there is one, the advance stop line). I can't tell from the streetview image, or from streetview itself or the satellite view, whether the cycle path moves from the road to the footway before the stop line or not. If it does - you don't have to cross the line, and the light doesn't affect you (so long as you ...


4

Generally speaking, Saturdays and Sundays are quieter than weekdays. The Department of Transport collects various statistics on road use. This table (TRA0307) shows average traffic by time and day of the week. There's also this table (TRA0306) which shows average traffic by day for different road types and different vehicles. Finally, there are statistics ...


4

I've checked the Highway Code, and Rule 160 seems to apply universally (I can't see anything in the Bicyclists section): "Once moving you should keep to the left, unless road signs or markings indicate otherwise." I have experienced a lot of dangerous situations recently on our local mixed-use cycle path, with oncoming cyclists on the wrong side (their right)...


4

It seems to me (neither a Scot nor a lawyer), that it's generally illegal to cycle along Scottish pavements (using the UK interpretation of "pavement": "sidewalk" in the US). According to a briefing for the Scottish Parliament: the issue of cycling on the pavement is more complicated than it may first appear. [...] As we will see... Firstly, they ...


4

If your current max is 20 miles, 50 miles will be painful. Prepare for that, and don't expect to be able to do much directly after your first rides. However, it's totally in the doable range. For the ride itself, I see three important points: If you can, invest into puncture resistant tires. They are worth every penny. Make sure your bike is in good shape ...


4

I'm really sorry to have to tell you this - you are in fact crazy ;-) The left shifter shifts the front, the right the rear. The cables are completely separate and cannot interfere with ether other. Even if the cables were swapped, the left shifter cannot shift the rear derailleur properly as it only has clicks for the front derailleur, and vice versa.


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