14

Can I put disk brakes on it? No. You cannot effectively convert a rim brake frame or forks to disc brakes. (Alternative answer: do I need to replace parts? Yes, the frame and forks.) Seriously though, if you are buying a new bike, buy the bike you actually want rather than planning to convert or upgrade. There are disc brake road bikes available across a ...


12

I've never used Claris, but I've used a bunch of different Shimano road stuff, from 8 to 11 speed, as well as some SRAM. All other things being equal (which they never are), the more expensive Shimano groupset shifts smoother than the less expensive one. That, however, is splitting some really fine hairs. The shifting performance for modern brifters is nice ...


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


11

You've got two things going against you: Height: I'd suggest avoiding 700c wheels and going for 650b (pricer) or 26" wheels. For short riders (I'd say shorter than 5'5"), these provide better fit. Surly, for example, only makes their small bikes with 26" wheels. Weight: You're going to have to check each manufacturer's weight limit. Generally, hybrids and ...


9

It really depends on your budget. Shimano 105 is quite a bit better than Claris. Claris uses an 8 speed cassette while 105 uses an 11 speed cassette. This means that 105 will have smaller gaps between the gears if both bikes have the same gear range. There are 2 levels between Claris and 105. They are Sora (9 speed cassette ) and Tiagra (10 speed cassette)....


9

I took the bike to another bike shop. The man there adjusted my handle bar (apparently when I did it myself, it was not good enough, not straight or aligned). Then he put the bike on a stand and checked gear shifting to all the gears. It all worked fine. He also pointed out the slight rattling noise I heard is caused by the chain rubbing against the ...


8

As everyone above points out, you'll pay double or triple to upgrade piecemeal. Save up buy a whole bike. Used if you have to. The two items that I would consider are NOT on your list: If you are at the upper limit of your seat height, you might consider getting a longer seat post. It's hard to pedal if you're not getting good leg extension. (The frame ...


7

Your height might be more challenging to fit than your weight; your weight is well within tolerance for most bikes, steel or aluminum. Don't buy a too-big bike; it'll make you unhappy and might even cause injury. Especially at first while you're still getting used to cycling, you will likely be more comfortable with a fairly upright position in the saddle. (...


7

I'm researching my new road bike too. Here's info on shimano road sets, originally from: http://www.chainreactionhub.com/road/980-our-guide-to-shimanos-road-groupsets-from-tiagra-to-dura-ace with some additional comments by me. Common: All of these have shifter mechanisms in the brakes, so they're "brifters" Nothing road-based has thumb shifters like a ...


7

Cranks and chainrings are made of aluminium, which does not rust. You'll probably be fine with cleaning them and new cassette and chain. This isn't that expensive any more. From quick googling, your bike uses 7-speed cassette, which are still available. Upgrading to modern parts would require replacing all transmission components, shifters, derailleurs and ...


7

Only you can decide if you "need or "want" a road bike. I would not upgrade your mountain bike in an attempt to make it a better road bike. As the saying goes a pig wearing lipstick is still a pig. If you want to road ride for a change of scenery or pace buy a used quality built bike. The used market should have lots of bikes suitable to the ...


6

I basically agree with @RoboKaren's answer, but wanted to add a couple of things that would take up too much space for a comment. For starters, you say that the chain mashed up the derailleur. So the derailleur was actually the "victim" of the problem, not necessarily the cause. So while you might need to replace the derailleur, that is likely not the only ...


6

If your bicycle is a BSO (bicycle shaped object sold at discount mass retailers), then likely no. You'd spend $100+ labor on the derailleur and a new chain, but then the next week the brakes would fail, the handlebar would come off, or the frame would crack. BSOs are money pits. Furthermore, it's unlikely you could just replace the derailleur, you'd have to ...


6

A 11 speed cassette would mean a new hub (probably a new wheel realistically) and likely a new derailleur to match the cable pull of the STI shifters plus the labor (this includes installation of the new cable stops, new cables, re-wrapping the bar after putting on the new brifters, etc.). You will also need to spread the frame to get a modern hub in there, ...


6

You can ride any bike in a race, provided it's in good enough working order to get you over the line. Regarding gears, it looks like the cost to add derailleur style gears may be prohibitive, as I assume this bike's rear wheel is single-speed specific and the dropouts aren't vertical (which isn't the end of the world but not ideal). I'd probably either look ...


6

You're stuck with square taper bottom brackets. But there are plenty of good square taper cranksets still on the market (new and used). You have a few options though: Velo Orange sells a french threaded bottom bracket under their Grand Cru line for about 50 USD (For comparison, the usual Shimano BB-UN55 is about 15 USD) Phil Wood sells french threaded ...


5

With an inexpensive bike like this upgrading individual components not worth it. You can't really replace the frame - replacement frames do not exist at this price level. If the bike is too small for you, you need a new bike. Either save for a whole new bike, or perhaps look at clothing and accessories that will make your riding more enjoyable and easier.


5

You say that your bike is incompatible with your height. Upgrading won't fix that at all. You also say that you want to save weight, but you're riding a low-end bike with suspension forks and big fat tyres. If you're riding on the road or paved bike paths, you don't need either of those things. By an overwhelming margin, your $400 would be best spent on a ...


5

To answer the 'is it cost effective?' question you have to know what you are getting for the upgrades. Are replacement components going to be lighter, more efficient or more durable? You could say that if you can't feel the difference then there is no point in upgrading a component. However, if you enjoy the process of upgrading your bike, and the upgrades ...


5

Rim and disc brakes have completely different mounts. The front disc would be mounted at the bottom of the left fork leg, and the rear would be mounted where the seat and chain stay intersect. It’s not just the mounting points: the tubes in disc brake bikes are different. the carbon layup is denser or the metal tubing is much thicker at the disc mount point ...


5

To do this "properly" you need to replace all these parts: a new frame with disk caliper mounts a new fork with disk caliper mounts all the brake system parts, being calipers and rotors, hose etc. new wheel hubs front and rear with disk rotor mounts longer replacement spokes for your front wheel to rebuild it with a cross lacing pattern It is possible you ...


5

The Multitrak is really a hybrid designed for light off road, on road and touring. You are right not to try and upgrade the bike parts. As long as you stick within its limits it will be fine. Enjoy the ride you have. If you enjoy it enough to justify it, save up for a new(er) bike. Your legs and arms are the suspension. If you learn to 'ride lightly', there ...


5

Upgrading an existing bike piecemeal is always going to be more expensive than buying a new bike with the specs you want, because manufacturers get components at a discount. Regarding Option 1, upgraded components will not transmit more stress to the frame, if that's what you're asking. It is possible (but seems unlikely) that the frame was engineered with ...


4

TL; DR: There is going to be a lot of difference. A 1500 Euro bike today would probably be comparable to a 6-7000 Euro bike from 10 years ago. Elaboration: There are going to be quite a few improvements in the bike due to technology advances and research and development. Some of the base models will not be radically different from your frame, although even ...


4

From the pictures you've posted across a few different questions, I can almost guarantee you will not make money selling that bike, no matter what you do to it. At the very least you will need a new freewheel and chain, new tyres, cables, and brake pads. Sadly, those will probably set you back more than you could sell the bike for. Given your apparent lack ...


4

My mother was a similar build before she lost a lot of weight. She is the expert I turned to in order to answer the question... in her opinion a women's Electra Townie, 7 speed with 24 inch wheels is "Great for stability and the size is perfect for a 5"2' frame." She owns one, and rides often. Good luck.


4

In general, it is a good idea to bring a bike bought online to a shop for a once-over check. What your local bike shop said is exactly what many other shops will/would say. Not that the bike wasn't put together properly, but it should probably be double checked to make that it assembled correctly AND that nothing wiggled loose during shipping. It's a small ...


4

A steel bike built to take a load (touring) and big (soft) tires. I don't like to recommend a specific bike but something like a Troll or MARRAKESH with flat bars. Troll is 26" wheels so an XS is small. Or go with an older nice used steel mtn bike no shocks. They go for like $300 as they are very popular with refugees coming to the US. In case you are ...


4

Wow This question has provoked some impassioned debate, all in the time it took for my morning ride. Take a step back for a moment. Let's say that you get what you pay for. While not always true, let's go with that for a moment. The guy charging 50 quid is saying a bike service from me is worth 50 quid. Is a bike service worth 50 quid to you? Apparently ...


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