40

Leave your current bike alone, save your money for the replacement bike. To make a significant difference to the current bike you'll probably have to spend a significant fraction of the original purchase price and face major headaches figuring out compatibility of components. Leave it original and sell it when you get the new bike. If you do want to spend ...


28

There are potentially a lot of ins and outs to this question, as one could ask what discipline you're talking about, how aggressive of a rider you are, skill level, etc, as it all has an impact on how likely you are to be punished for going cheap, and how severely. However, there's a really good axiom in cycling: "Cheap, light, and strong. Pick two." Your ...


20

looking at your bike, which I basically see as a alu-105 setup (albeit a good setup, Felts are lovely bikes), I can suggest a few things but right away I'll say I don't think there is a "magic bullet". In no particular order: wheels, as you say. On a lot of low-to-mid-range bikes, you just need to look at what wheelset they have to realise that this is ...


20

All the above answers are valid and good. In addition to that, I would strongly advise focusing on what is sometimes called "rider fit". It is the position of your seat, seat post, handlebars etc. The big one will be the seat height relative to inside leg length. You may find that minor upgrades such as stem length dramatically improve bike feel. This will ...


18

There is plenty of joy your new bike will give you. Wait a bit before upgrading. You need to build up experience and knowledge, and your current new bike is fine for that purpose. This is only a supplement to other fine and reasonable answers already given. Argenti Apparatus makes a very good point that the reasonable thing to do is to replace the whole ...


17

I'm not sure why you think you need disc brakes on a hybrid, but if you want a hybrid with disc brakes it might be cheaper to buy a newer hybrid with that comes with them (for same quality brakes). You won't be messing around with questionable adapters. In fact you might not even be able to source an adapter that will work with your fork depending on the ...


15

Having a Felt F75 myself, I would recommend the following upgrade path from stock: Clipless pedals They take some getting used to, but behold the extra power and comfort! Tyres (and tubes). Vredestein Fortezza Tricomp or similar lightweight folding tyres will give noticeably better grip than stock equipment. Latex inner tubes will smooth the ride and reduce ...


14

Can I put disk brakes on it? No. You cannot effectively convert a rim brake frame or forks to disc brakes. (Alternative answer: do I need to replace parts? Yes, the frame and forks.) Seriously though, if you are buying a new bike, buy the bike you actually want rather than planning to convert or upgrade. There are disc brake road bikes available across a ...


12

There are generally two types of dropper seatposts, mechanical (e.g. GravityDropper) and hydraulic (e.g. RockShox Reverb). Mechanical dropper seatposts use a spring to move the seatpost and a bolt to keep it in place. This is a very simple design and there are few things that can break or jam, and the weight is also kept very reasonable since there are few ...


12

Cable replacements, chain, tubes, all those are "consumables" Even spoke replacement is not an uncommon problem to have periodically. A bike isn't a cellphone to be discarded when its a bit tired - periodic maintenance is easy. Consider that if you were using a car, there would be oil/filter changes and fuel, perhaps a light bulb every couple years and a ...


12

The Giant Reign is a long travel 'enduro' bike that is designed to be ridden down steep technical trails, not pedalled down road/fire trail. It's most likely that changing to a 39-53 will not work as the inner chainring will catch the chain stays, and even if it did work, it would compromise the bike in technical terrain, increasing the chances of '...


11

Upgrading an older bike is typically not economical. Parts are typically not cheaper. Parts are not as available. That drivetrain is not compatible with a modern bike. Bikes have gotten better. Little faster, lighter, more comfortable, and easier to service. You can find decent to nice newer model used bikes for $400. Find someone that bought an $800 ...


10

There is really precious little difference between new bikes in terms of efficiency. Most of it is illusory. All ball bearings have low friction. All chain drives are >90% efficient. All bikes weigh so much less than your body that weight has little effect on actual trip time. The biggy is knobbly tyres if you have them - these actually soak up a lot of ...


9

how does a higher fork contribute to higher stress in the frame? By creating a longer lever, and stretching the end of that lever to a greater angle, it transmits more force to the bottom of the head tube (the part of the frame where the steer tube passes through). This can cause damage to the head tube itself or where it joins both the down tube and top ...


9

Yes, straight pull spokes are technically superior to traditional J-bend spokes. The only reason that J-bend spokes are relatively more popular is because it's cheaper to machine a hub with simple flanges on a lathe. Well-designed straightpull hubs typically cost more. Note that a straight-pull spoke in generally can and should be tensioned higher than ...


9

There are two aspects to the derailer that come into play here. One is total capacity, which is the total amount of variance in chain slack the derailer can accommodate while keeping the chain taut. Single ring setups such as yours with any kind of "traditional" range cassette (say 12-32 as opposed to whats on some modern 1x bikes, like 10-50) come nowhere ...


9

Taking into account your flying like Superman one day part in your question, I would like to nuance the last paragraph of Grigory Rechistov's answer. In my urban cycling experience it's the parts in front of your center of gravity (front wheel, fork, headset, etc...) that should be super reliable as a failure of those elements would send you flying forward, ...


9

We can't tell you what upgrades you should make, because we are not you. We don't know what your preferences or priorities are, what kind of rider you are or what riding you want to do (apart from knowing you have a long distance goal in mind). Go ride the bike. Make a training plan for your long distance ride. Go ride the bike more. Figure out what works ...


8

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


8

A road groupset usually consists of a number of parts. There are not many tools, and they are generally not that expensive. With all the resources out there (youtube, sheldon brown website, etc) and basic mechanical aptitude it isn't a difficult task. You need basic hand/bike tools, (hammer, metric allen keys/drivers, screwdrivers, pliers, socket set, ...


8

Revised to make a more standalone answer, rather than rely on the context given by @FalseIdentity's question, and to incorporate some of the commentary. As with all testing, we want to find problems, so we need to do things what will discover them. But we are also the test pilot, so we have to maintain safety. Essentially, we need to test every aspect of ...


8

I would take it into a Local Bike Shop for servicing. Unfortunately many high street companies will sell you what we call a Bike Shaped Object. These at best are barely functional assortment of parts. At their worse at literally death traps on wheels, with improperly installed parts (back to front forks anyone?). A quick once over should ensure the bike is ...


8

In bicycling componentry what applies is "cheap, light, reliable — choose two". To explain this, a cheap component may be reliable enough, but it will be heavy. Light top-tier parts will cost you a lot. It is when you see light and cheap stuff on sale you should become very careful. Entry level components are typically made of steel and aluminum alloys and ...


7

One thing to look out for is the size of the drop from the bolt securing the brake to the frame, and the brake blocks, to ensure the new brakes will fit in such a way that the blocks line up with the rims. Probably if you have a newish bike, then any new brakes you buy will be of the same dimension as new brakes. But it's worth making sure they'll fit - ...


7

It is relatively simple to find parts to fit old bikes. Things have changed a lot but there are still enough old bikes out there that you will not have a difficult time getting replacement chains, cogsets, derailers, wheels, bottom brackets, wheel bearings, seat posts, stems, headsets, or anything else. Any gaps in what is available can likely be filled by a ...


7

Well, 26 will feel a whole lot better than your current 23. You can get away with lower air pressure because of the larger volume supporting your weight. Lower pressure means smoother ride. Of course two tires of the same size can feel very different because of the quality of the casing and rubber. For commuting, I would say get as big as you can fit, which ...


6

Having restored a number of old cheap bikes, I can tell you that the biggest problem is almost never the derailleurs/shifters. Usually these bikes have not been ridden much and have spent most of their time in a garage exposed to the elements. The biggest problems are rusted parts, poor lubrication, and horrifically bad tuning. Frequently, on a bike like ...


6

I had the same problem (48x38x28 chainset). It turned out that MF-TZ21 is actually not a 'cassette', but a 'freewheel'. Your options for that are very limited: In the UK, Raleigh is distributing a 7 speed 13-24T model for less than 10 quid. SunRace is still producing 7 speed freewheels, but the closed-spaced 12-?? model wasn't distributed in the UK: Check ...


6

The 14/28 is the number of teeth on the smallest and largest cog of the cassette. From your description you want to make at least the second number smaller, possibly the first number. As long as your replacement says that it's Shimano compatible (and 7 speed), you should be fine. Count the teeth on the cog that has the most teeth that you actually use......


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