28

There are potentially a lot of ins and outs to this question, as one could ask what discipline you're talking about, how aggressive of a rider you are, skill level, etc, as it all has an impact on how likely you are to be punished for going cheap, and how severely. However, there's a really good axiom in cycling: "Cheap, light, and strong. Pick two." Your ...


17

I'm not sure why you think you need disc brakes on a hybrid, but if you want a hybrid with disc brakes it might be cheaper to buy a newer hybrid with that comes with them (for same quality brakes). You won't be messing around with questionable adapters. In fact you might not even be able to source an adapter that will work with your fork depending on the ...


12

The Giant Reign is a long travel 'enduro' bike that is designed to be ridden down steep technical trails, not pedalled down road/fire trail. It's most likely that changing to a 39-53 will not work as the inner chainring will catch the chain stays, and even if it did work, it would compromise the bike in technical terrain, increasing the chances of '...


9

Taking into account your flying like Superman one day part in your question, I would like to nuance the last paragraph of Grigory Rechistov's answer. In my urban cycling experience it's the parts in front of your center of gravity (front wheel, fork, headset, etc...) that should be super reliable as a failure of those elements would send you flying forward, ...


9

We can't tell you what upgrades you should make, because we are not you. We don't know what your preferences or priorities are, what kind of rider you are or what riding you want to do (apart from knowing you have a long distance goal in mind). Go ride the bike. Make a training plan for your long distance ride. Go ride the bike more. Figure out what works ...


8

In bicycling componentry what applies is "cheap, light, reliable — choose two". To explain this, a cheap component may be reliable enough, but it will be heavy. Light top-tier parts will cost you a lot. It is when you see light and cheap stuff on sale you should become very careful. Entry level components are typically made of steel and aluminum alloys and ...


6

The best upgrade is the one that solves a specific problem or replaces a worn out part. Changing out any part on your bike should be done with a goal in mind. Your goals should be determined by identifying some specific way your bike could work better for you based on your riding style, terrain and personal goals. A "good" upgrade for one person could be a ...


5

regarding the amount of teeth on the sprockets/crankset: The ratio between the amount of teeth on the rear sprocket and crankset determines the gear ratio of the bike. Even though you have a gear hub the ratio between the sprockets will still determine your gear ratio. The smaller the sprocket in the back/the bigger in the front the higher your top speed is,...


5

That bike is what it is, a great urban and light trail machine built to a price point. You got what you paid for. Get out and braap. Most worthy upgrades like wheels, drive train, brakes and suspension will cost the same or more than you paid for the whole thing originally. So don’t spend any more than you need to cover breakages/maintenance. The limiting ...


5

To do this "properly" you need to replace all these parts: a new frame with disk caliper mounts a new fork with disk caliper mounts all the brake system parts, being calipers and rotors, hose etc. new wheel hubs front and rear with disk rotor mounts longer replacement spokes for your front wheel to rebuild it with a cross lacing pattern It is possible you ...


5

There are two classes of 'cheap' bike parts. One that looks like a top end part but is cheaply made. And one that is sturdy and not fashionable, but which they can produce cheap because they do not need to change manufacturing every time. That first class is the kind to avoid. Do not buy the cheap knock-off version of an expensive (and/or highly fashionable)...


5

What you have there is a freewheel, not a cassette. The difference is a freewheel combines the freewheel ratchet mechanism and sprockets and mounts on a large diameter thread on the hub; the freehub/cassette system puts the freewheel ratchet mechanism in the hub and the sprockets slide on a splined freehub body. See here for in depth explaination. You ...


4

Let's clarify some terms. A "rim" is the hoop at the perimeter of the wheel, which you mount the tires on. It sounds like you're talking about replacing the entire wheel. It is possible to cut off the old rim and rebuild the wheel with new spokes and rim, although probably more expensive than just buying a stock wheel. A "cassette" is a cluster of gears ...


4

You need same number of speeds, same cog spacing and freehub body splines splines. If you don't have any specific need to change the range, you can pick the same sizes. If you want to change the range, there are plenty of answers about that on this site. For cog spacing and splines, there are two common ones for 8-speed: one for Campagnolo and other for ...


4

Rim and disc brakes have completely different mounts. The front disc would be mounted at the bottom of the left fork leg, and the rear would be mounted where the seat and chain stay intersect. It’s not just the mounting points: the tubes in disc brake bikes are different. the carbon layup is denser or the metal tubing is much thicker at the disc mount point ...


4

As you have a 1x drivetrain with non-integrated brakes and shifters upgrading it to one with more gears is relatively simple. You need to replace the shifter, rear derailleur and cassette and chain at a minimum. You can also replace the crankset and bottom bracket. As you have an 8 speed cassette the freehub body will take up to an 10 speed cassette with no ...


4

I believe the Gates CDN and CDX systems use the same belt and sprocket tooth design, but differ in materials used (CDN rear sprockets are glass fiber reinforced plastic, CDX are metal), so all the components are compatible with each other. Same applied to base CDX, CDX EXP and CDX SL. You can replace the plastic CDN rear sprocket and belt first if those are ...


4

In addition to Argenti Apparatus’ excellent answer I’d like to focus on the traveling aspect. The main difference to “normal“ long rides is that you’ll need some way to carry luggage. If you travel lightly (e.g. just some spare clothes and snacks) you might get away with a backpack, though the additional weight on your hands and butt can get uncomfortable. ...


3

For a 2016 bike first thing to do should be replacing "spesific urgent needs" as mentioned in another answer. Then I would check the parts with operatonal life time and replace if they are expired. Few examples are; Chain Brake pads Tyres Handle tape Cables etc. When you have a solid bike without any broken or diminished part, you can start to replace ...


3

Long story - freewheels died off, with the 7 speed freehweel being about the last you could get. 6 and 7 speed freewheels still exist because they're cheap and suit low-price bikes. However as cassettes got wider, the 7 speed was more likely to bend its rear axle on an impact like a pothole or a driveway ramp. The 8 speed design with a freewheel would be ...


3

Two issues with what you are proposing: The splined freehub body that the cassette slides onto on the hub were narrower on a 7 speed drivetrains than later 8, 9 or 10 speed drivetrains. See this Sheldon Brown page. You might have a 8/9/10 speed compatible hub with a 7 speed cassette and 4.5mm spacer. If that's the case you can upgrade to 9 speeds. If not ...


3

Yes, I think that would work The Escape is Altus 8 speed with rim brakes. For a 10 speed replacement group you will not need to mess with the hub, a 10 speed cassette will fit The bottom bracket shell is threaded as the Escape has a cartridge BB. You'll obviously need to replace that with a external bearing unit. It does not matter if the shell is 68 or ...


3

What you are proposing to do is basically impossible. There is no documented compatibility between Shimano mountain and road groupset components. The derailleurs have different actuation ratios (how far the cage moves for a given length of cable pull). MTB and road cassettes have different sprocket spacings. I've not read about anyone experimenting with ...


2

A 3x8 crank will work with a 7 speed system. 7 and 8 speed chains are the same, as is the spacing between the chainrings. The Claris crank specification can be found on the Shimano Manuals and Technical Documents site here. The FC-R2030 seems to only come in 50-39-30. If that is larger than you current crank you'll need to check that you have sufficient ...


2

Product recommendations are off-topic for bicycles.se, but yes, there are a few. They mostly cater to recumbent riders. A web search for bicycle fairing should give you some options. There are also velomobiles, which are fully or mostly enclosed recumbent trikes sold as a finished product. These are not designed purely for speed--they're usually intended as ...


2

Cheap handlebars will send me flying like Superman one day Why should they? Like everything else, a bike is as good as the weakest link. If the handlebars aren't the weakest link in your performance, leave them along. Or as the saying goes, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it!" If you're putting high loads on your bars, for example with jumps, then you ...


2

Good question. Another angle on this is longevity and ease of replacement. Really cheap parts can end up costing more if you do any sort of mileage. If it's a cassette then you can just try it and see but replacing a hub, bottom bracket or headset can be a bit more of a pain. I think there's never really any particular reason to go higher end than about ...


2

Is there a site that can help you with compatibility among all parts? Yes There are sites that will let you pick all of the compatible components for a bicycle. The following are sites built by people who want to make money selling you a custom bike (these are examples of bike builder apps, not recommendations). Fanatic.com has a bike builder feature on ...


2

Beside the other good answers, I have two other suggestions for you, to help you with your decision where to save. Is it a "needs replacement frequently" part? If yes, buy cheap. Sure, the expensive part may last a bit longer until it needs replacement, but in most cases I have encountered, over a lifetime of a bicycle, buying cheaper expendables at a ...


2

The Sora front derailleur is not compatible with the front 105 shifter. Shimano changed the actuation ratio (ratio of cable pulled to cage movement) on 11 speed road groups. The Sora crank is not compatible with a narrower 11 speed chain. The chainring spacing is optimized for a wider 9 speed chain. YOu can look up Shimano component compatibility on their ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible