14

Can I put disk brakes on it? No. You cannot effectively convert a rim brake frame or forks to disc brakes. (Alternative answer: do I need to replace parts? Yes, the frame and forks.) Seriously though, if you are buying a new bike, buy the bike you actually want rather than planning to convert or upgrade. There are disc brake road bikes available across a ...


13

You should ride whatever you find comfortable. If the old saddle was good, swap it to the new bike. If you intend on riding both bikes, keep eyes open for a second saddle of the same brand/model. You can store or sell the original saddle. Saddles are a personal thing, noone can tell you what will be comfortable. Since you call the narrow saddle ...


11

Even cheap components should shift okay-ish, unless they are badly worn. Shifting problems are usually caused by any combination of: Bad adjustment: Incorrectly set cable tension or limit screws. Excessive cable friction: Due to bad routing, worn cables, worn cables housing, missing/bad cable housing end caps or very low-quality cables. Bent derailleur ...


7

The reason that buying a road bike is better than adapting a hybrid bike to be a road bike is very much related to economic factors. Therefore the complaint that "not everyone can afford one" is poor thinking. In reality, the process of adapting a hybrid bike to be a completely different bike is actually rather expensive and will not even be value ...


6

To do that you need to change the shifter and derailleur as well. Different brands, and different numbers of cogs on the rear require different amounts of pull on the gear cable to shift one gear, and the cogs, chain etc are all different sizes. This also means that the total cable moved to get from highest to lowest gear is generally also different. Note ...


6

You can buy new components to improve your comfort, performance, or to reduce weight in general. Comfort is simple but important: if you find that something does not fit you, replace it. Examples: saddle, stem (longer/shorter etc to change reach), handlebar width, tires (if you want a plushier ride, have wider tires) etc. Don't forget about shoes, helmet ...


5

There's no point replacing the fork. A better fork will be more robust but replacing a major component is not cost effective. A better fork will cost a significant fraction of the whole bike as a separate component. If you want a better fork you should have spent the money buying a higher spec bike in the first place. Wider tires are relatively inexpensive ...


5

The thing is: You can’t just slap a drop bar onto a hybrid or MTB and expect it to behave like a proper road bike. Usually the frame will be too long, unless you purposefully got a smaller frame. In addition, getting all the new components (handlebar, brifters, maybe even new derailleur etc.) is expensive. So in a way “get a road bike if you want a road bike”...


4

FSA Megaexo bottom brackets are dimensionally the same as Shimano Hollowtech II road cranks/bottom brackets, so you should be able to just fit a Shimano crank in there. Personally I'd replace it with a higher quality Shimano unit though. I'll assume when you say your rims are 11 speed compatible you mean wheels - that is the freehub body is compatible with ...


4

I've done this conversion last year on my #2 bike from a 2013 Ultegra 10-speed to a 105 11-speed, to be able to use the 11-speed equipped wheels of a newer bike on my two bikes alternatively and avoid cassette swaps to do so. The swapped parts are: the brifters, both derailleurs and the chain. The cassette of course! There is no need to replace the ...


4

If you can identify the specific part number on the crank (or just by looking at pictures online), Shimano provides a great deal of information online about compatibility. For example, if you are using the current Tourney FC-TX801 crank, it uses a standard threaded square-taper bottom bracket, so any square taper crank will work. The SORA R3000 crankset you ...


4

In general, you may be able to check the bike manufacturer’s page for your bicycle. They will usually list all the components the bike is built with. However, the list may not be comprehensive, especially if the manufacturer mainly sells lower end brands. Bottom bracket standards can be confusing, because there are a number of variations. In this case, you ...


4

Better 8 speed shifters than exist now are pretty unlikely to start existing in the future, so any recommendation is unlikely to become obsolete. For robustness, the hot setup is SL-BS64 shifters (the ones you already have if they're Shimano) on Paul Thumbie mounts. Loctite the heck out of the mounting screw for the shifter part. They perform great too, ...


4

It depends a lot on the seating position and riding intensity. A casual e-bike is usually intended for an upright seating position. Often the saddle will be too low and the user rides at a low intensity (and low pedaling cadence). So most of the weight will be on the buttocks. Rides on such bikes are usually too short for chafing to become painful. There is ...


4

To go to 105 you would have to do the following: Front + Rear Derailleur Cassette, Chain Rings Chain STI Lever (at least the right one) - This alone is like $150 per lever if I recall correctly. Possibly new rear wheel Overall most people will not make a jump from Claris to 105 because the costs usually end up being almost the same price as 50% or more of ...


4

Some problems in your plan that I can see from the pictures. There is no rear derailleur hanger provided on the rear dropout. Without it, you cannot install a rear derailleur. There seems to be no place to install more than one rear cog, as the rear hub is designed to take single speed BMX-styled freewheel. Without the possibility to have a derailleur and ...


4

You have several options depending what is important to her, I am presuming cost is a factor. 11-34 cassette with new derailleur and chain (given cassettes and chains are consumable) is cost effective, but it does mean the jump between gear changes increases. If she does not need the higher gears then there are ways to bodge a cassette of say 14-34 that ...


4

Others are mostly suggesting alternatives, but I think you deserve the answer to the option you asked about. Yes, there should not be any problem with doing that change. It should work perfectly fine, you will just need a longer chain. I have this Sora with 11-32 on my road bike and I do not think the steps are unbearably large. My main bike even uses the ...


4

Any 8 speed derailleur should work fine - the higher the "grade" the better made they are. However the incremental difference is slight, and simply "not mashed" could be all you need as long as it performed satisfactorilly beforehand. Another way to view it is that the same part has a cost of $x, and a fancier unit has cost $y, but you ...


3

While they are a few "adapters" that might sometimes allow installing the rear disc caliper onto certain frames (if lucky), these adapters look ugly and certainly won't fit the aesthetics of a road bike. Such an adapter would be more fitting for a hybrid, utility or ancient mountain bike. Similar adapters for forks do not exist because a rim brake ...


3

The simple, cheap way to do this using an off-the-shelf product is buy a 10-speed Campy to HG conversion cassette. Various options for this have existed over time; the only one I can see now is an IRD 11-32, which would work if you used the low limit to lock out whatever cogs on it the RD can't clear or that you don't have the chain length for. This is ...


3

How much clearance do you have? The rear tire has to fit between the rear seat stays, chain stays and rim brakes (if you have them). Front tire has to fit through fork and rim brakes (if you have them). A wide front tire can also increase toe overlap (i.e. your toes hitting the wheel in tight turns). You’ll probably want to go as wide as you can. If you plan ...


3

Buying bike then immediately trying to upgrade components is a mistake. It would have been better to take all the money available for post purchase upgrades and putting it into just buying a higher specification bike in the first place. Components cost significantly less when purchased as part of a whole bike. is it as simple as replacing the front ...


3

I am a maker of custom bikes for kids and small adults. I am a heavy user of the interrupter-style levers, even for main brake levers. The main reason that I use them is that they are easy to adapt to a custom bracket which fits smaller-diameter handlebars and smaller hands. Another great benefit, they are some of the lightest levers available, period, at as ...


2

Determining the weakest point is impossible to say. What is going to fail first will depend on the terrain, speed and the aggressiveness of your riding style. If you are new to mountain biking your perception of what is rough ground will be far different than that of a more experienced rider. So just ride it until something fails. You have what is best ...


2

Don't do it. Yes, back when disk brakes were new and few bikes were available with them it sorta made sense to "upgrade" the bike to disks (though you had to be a real bike nerd to do this). But, as the others have said, the compromises you'd have to make to get disks to work on a non-disk bike are expensive, dangerous, and just flaky. If you ...


2

I've done something similar - mixing a shimano 105 9 speed triple chainset with a 10 speed chain and a 10 speed cassette and 10 speed derailleur. It all worked adequately. It ran fine after a lot of tweaking. However my chainrings were worn and I had similar slips while climbing. So I scored some new-old-stock chainrings for the big and middle rings, and ...


2

Regarding ‘which [groupset] will fit?’ Bicycles are generally so standardized that you can swap out groupsets easily and only have to deal with one or two areas of compatibility. In your case you need to consider the rear wheel. The freehub body for 11 speed compatible hubs is 1.8mm longer than those for 8-10 speed. You’ll have to examine your hub too see if ...


2

I don’t think the wheel set will be much of an upgrade. I see them for 141€ in Germany and they are quite heavy at 1826g. They also don’t look like they make up for the weight with better aerodynamics. Edit: Something like the Vision Team 35 Comp SL or Fulcrum Quattro LG would probably be an upgrade, especially since they are more aero which should benefit ...


2

$1K USD new would get you in the range of 9 speed Sora with a low to mid-range aluminum frame, so it wouldn’t be too bad of an option either. In the used market, you could likely get 105 11 speed mechanical on a mid-high end aluminum frame. Those Campagnolo wheels appear to come with the campy freehub body, so you’ll need to factor in the cost of a ...


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