24

Broadly, not a lot. Legally it's probably technically unlawful on several grounds (horn not used as a warning device, causing alarm, loud noise, possibly harassment), but they're all petty offences and unlikely to get a useful response from Police. If it happens in front of a cop they might pull the motorist over for a chat, but that's unlikely. My answer ...


24

As a one-off, that should be completely doable. Your fitness from running and the gym should be plenty enough, especially as the route is pretty flat. Bear in mind that it will be tiring, since cycling uses different muscles to running, and the saddle may get a bit uncomfortable if you're not used to it. Make sure you have plenty of water and something like ...


20

Yeah, buy a used bike somewhere, either at a shop that has a bunch, or off or Craig's List or another "want ad" source. And, of course, there are yard sales. If you shop carefully you can probably pick up a serviceable bike for $50-100. But first study bikes a little to learn to recognize quality. Look at the cheap bikes at Walmart and some moderately ...


19

My experience is mostly in Canada as well (southern Ontario), so perhaps I can provide a closer-to-home viewpoint. I bike in a city with poor infrastructure that was designed for cars first, and everything else second (though that's changing). This means I get into a lot of situations where drivers honk at me, typically around 1 incident per 100km biked in-...


16

For practical day to day commuting I would stay away from a fixie because: You are not a very experienced cyclist, riding a fixie in traffic is actually not that easy. No fenders, so dirty clothes/mud in the face on rainy days. No rear-rack, so for luggage you are forced to use a backpack. I also wouldn't go for the type of urban bike you link because: ...


16

Apart from going the high-tech route of a front suspension with lock-out, you can also try to get wider tires. The slow-down of wide tires is not that big, but they naturally even out high-frequency bumps. The wider the tire, the smoother your ride gets on the rough roads. Maybe, that's all you need.


14

Use proper positioning. This is most important. Unless the outermost lane is as wide as two SUVs, ride in its center. When it's safe, reasonable and necessary to let drivers pass, kindly move over; but always leave at least 18 inches (0.5 m) between you and the curb. The driver behind you may have to wait a minute or two, but they'll survive. If they've ...


14

Man, just do it! There isn't much that can go wrong. If you feel tired, turn around midway. Take a mobile phone with you in case something happens, look up the weather forecast, take something to eat and drink with you (or some money to buy some). If you end up at a different location than initially planned, so be it; my personal experience is that too much ...


13

Recycled Cycles (in the University District area) sells used bicycles, I would also checkout seattle.craigslist.org I recommend going into a bike shop that just sells bicycles (Gregg's near Green Lake is great - but many others all around Seattle) and tell them what sort of riding you are planning (commuting, shopping and using the bicycle as transportation)...


13

The roads in London aren't particularly special, they can be quite busy, they are often quite full of motorised traffic, cyclists don't always have the best reputation for adhering to all laws (e.g. one-way streets and red lights) and, as a consequence, many other road users don't always go out of their way to be overly friendly or forgiving, but it's a ...


13

These are the options I use depending on the circumstances: Trackstand: Requires a lot of practice and it is a bit of a swhowoff. (This is the one I use the less) Partially Dismount: Preferred when riding cleated pedals. Dominant foot stays on the pedal, and the pedal is kept ready for a full stroke (at 45 degrees over the horizontal as the other answer ...


11

Inflate your tires to a higher pressure. Use a pump with a pressure gauge instead of going by "feel". Check the pressure more often. The max pressure listed on the sidewall is a good starting point, but if you're already inflating to max psi, you may want to exceed it a bit. It's likely you have a slow leak, and you're at a low inflation pressure by the ...


11

As for the Kryptonite, cutting one side an bending is certainly possible, but in reality if you can cut one side, you use the same tools to cut the other. The tools needed to bend the link after cutting one side are almost certainly not portable, and why would you carry two tools when one will do. In comparison to the D-lock--if you can cut though 18mm, you ...


10

On a slightly seperate tack from Unsliced (who covered all the bike-specific stuff I can think of): the road layouts themselves may be quite different than you're used to, even if you're familiar driving in the rest of the UK. They are often: very busy, in terms of traffic: on the plus side, the traffic is often not moving very fast, and if it's stationary ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


10

If your screw head is actually a nut, like the picture looks like, replace it with a nylock nut. If that is not possible, thread lock fluid like blue Loctite works nicely.


9

I get this question once in a while (working in Danish Cyclist Federation). It seems to be based on the idea that commuting by bike will expose you to more pollution than commuting by car. I have seen no research that proves this. However, I have seen research indicating that the opposite might be true. Some was in danish, but here's some in english and ...


9

I lack experience with entry-level (walmart, etc.) bikes, so take my answer with this in consideration. I was shopping this month for a good commuter bike to replace my old road bike (more about it below). I don't own a car, so I'll use it 15 miles per day, almost every workday between april and october, as well as for carrying all groceries and various ...


8

There are situations, such as ice, or slick leafs covering the road surface that make application of the front brake dangerous. Generally the front brake does all of the stopping because it does not lose traction until the bike flips; however, in the aforementioned scenarios, the front wheel is likely to lose traction, pitching the bike and rider to the ...


8

Nope - go for it. Here are two suggested routes from Strava, which were generated at https://www.strava.com/routes/new and then clicking a start and end point, and changing some options. This first one is based on "most popular with cyclists" and runs for 30 km with total elevation change of 204 metres. Another choice is "minimise elevation change" which ...


8

Better suspension has a "lockout" which basically clamps them in one position, leaving you with a heavy rigid fork for the 80% of your ride. Of those, some have a lever on top of the fork crown, and the fancier ones have a remote lockout as a lever on your bars (which means yet another cable going up). Your second option is to change something else - ...


7

You have a few options. One that has been marketed to cyclists has been the totobo mask which is from what I gather a re-usable N95 mask (although uncertified by any agency) with replaceable filter peices. It's cheap to try, at only $25 or so. The Respro is another option. It seems like a bit more customizable, and looks like the neoprene would ...


7

Personally, I think that good cycling helmets are beautiful. The lines are elegant. The transitions between the surface of the helmet and the vents are graceful. The way that the helmet increases in size from front to back is reminiscent of the wind. They're really quite astounding pieces of technology, if you really look at them. On the other hand, cheap ...


7

Strava has a heatmap function you can enable on their route planner. This will show the more frequently used streets and will vary intensity of color based on popularity. http://www.strava.com/routes/ Garmin Connect also has a heat map functionality built in to their route planner. http://connect.garmin.com/course/create The garmin maps seem to be ...


7

Let's unpack that a bit. The first consideration is control. Do wider or narrower bars give better control? Narrow bars mean that small movements cause larger direction changes, wider bars mean you have to move them more to steer. The amount you need to turn depends on your speed. If you're doing 30 kph (~20 mph) then you need only small steering ...


6

Everyone knows someone with a bike in their shed or garage that is unloved and unused. Just ask around on social media and one will fall in your lap...


6

To answer this question (which is different from asking "Which mask?") you have to define what "pollution" means and then examine the available masks to see if they do anything to reduce it. Just offhand, I believe that "pollution", in an urban traffic setting, consists of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide (and various other sulfur compounds), ...


6

Since I exclusively ride cleated pedals, what I always do whenever I need to come to a full stop is to shift to a low enough gear (on flats I'd shift to 34/21 or 34/23 -- I have a 'compact', ie. 50/34 crank), unclip my left foot, brake, then as I come to a stop, I shift my body towards the top tube and stand over it with my left foot on the ground. Usually ...


6

Bullying I am assuming that you are female, given that your screen name is Michelle. While there can be many suggestions about safe riding, the main point here is that these (male?) drivers are just bullying you. Plain and simple. One solution some cyclists use is to carry an obvious helmet camera, so that their behavior is witnessed. Edit: on ...


6

I used to get snakebites like crazy doing urban riding, even running really high pressures. I'm a big guy. What finally helped was running higher volume tires and wider. See if you can fit a wider tire in your frame, and look at getting some wider rims. Increasing the volume of air adds more cushioning. As Batman mentioned, going tubeless also helps, since ...


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