24

Broadly, not a lot. Legally it's probably technically unlawful on several grounds (horn not used as a warning device, causing alarm, loud noise, possibly harassment), but they're all petty offences and unlikely to get a useful response from Police. If it happens in front of a cop they might pull the motorist over for a chat, but that's unlikely. My answer ...


24

As a one-off, that should be completely doable. Your fitness from running and the gym should be plenty enough, especially as the route is pretty flat. Bear in mind that it will be tiring, since cycling uses different muscles to running, and the saddle may get a bit uncomfortable if you're not used to it. Make sure you have plenty of water and something like ...


19

My experience is mostly in Canada as well (southern Ontario), so perhaps I can provide a closer-to-home viewpoint. I bike in a city with poor infrastructure that was designed for cars first, and everything else second (though that's changing). This means I get into a lot of situations where drivers honk at me, typically around 1 incident per 100km biked in-...


16

For practical day to day commuting I would stay away from a fixie because: You are not a very experienced cyclist, riding a fixie in traffic is actually not that easy. No fenders, so dirty clothes/mud in the face on rainy days. No rear-rack, so for luggage you are forced to use a backpack. I also wouldn't go for the type of urban bike you link because: ...


16

Apart from going the high-tech route of a front suspension with lock-out, you can also try to get wider tires. The slow-down of wide tires is not that big, but they naturally even out high-frequency bumps. The wider the tire, the smoother your ride gets on the rough roads. Maybe, that's all you need.


14

Use proper positioning. This is most important. Unless the outermost lane is as wide as two SUVs, ride in its center. When it's safe, reasonable and necessary to let drivers pass, kindly move over; but always leave at least 18 inches (0.5 m) between you and the curb. The driver behind you may have to wait a minute or two, but they'll survive. If they've ...


14

Man, just do it! There isn't much that can go wrong. If you feel tired, turn around midway. Take a mobile phone with you in case something happens, look up the weather forecast, take something to eat and drink with you (or some money to buy some). If you end up at a different location than initially planned, so be it; my personal experience is that too much ...


13

These are the options I use depending on the circumstances: Trackstand: Requires a lot of practice and it is a bit of a swhowoff. (This is the one I use the less) Partially Dismount: Preferred when riding cleated pedals. Dominant foot stays on the pedal, and the pedal is kept ready for a full stroke (at 45 degrees over the horizontal as the other answer ...


11

As for the Kryptonite, cutting one side an bending is certainly possible, but in reality if you can cut one side, you use the same tools to cut the other. The tools needed to bend the link after cutting one side are almost certainly not portable, and why would you carry two tools when one will do. In comparison to the D-lock--if you can cut though 18mm, you ...


11

Inflate your tires to a higher pressure. Use a pump with a pressure gauge instead of going by "feel". Check the pressure more often. The max pressure listed on the sidewall is a good starting point, but if you're already inflating to max psi, you may want to exceed it a bit. It's likely you have a slow leak, and you're at a low inflation pressure by the ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


10

If your screw head is actually a nut, like the picture looks like, replace it with a nylock nut. If that is not possible, thread lock fluid like blue Loctite works nicely.


8

Strava has a heatmap function you can enable on their route planner. This will show the more frequently used streets and will vary intensity of color based on popularity. http://www.strava.com/routes/ Garmin Connect also has a heat map functionality built in to their route planner. http://connect.garmin.com/course/create The garmin maps seem to be more ...


8

Let's unpack that a bit. The first consideration is control. Do wider or narrower bars give better control? Narrow bars mean that small movements cause larger direction changes, wider bars mean you have to move them more to steer. The amount you need to turn depends on your speed. If you're doing 30 kph (~20 mph) then you need only small steering ...


8

Nope - go for it. Here are two suggested routes from Strava, which were generated at https://www.strava.com/routes/new and then clicking a start and end point, and changing some options. This first one is based on "most popular with cyclists" and runs for 30 km with total elevation change of 204 metres. Another choice is "minimise elevation change" which ...


8

Better suspension has a "lockout" which basically clamps them in one position, leaving you with a heavy rigid fork for the 80% of your ride. Of those, some have a lever on top of the fork crown, and the fancier ones have a remote lockout as a lever on your bars (which means yet another cable going up). Your second option is to change something else - ...


6

Everyone knows someone with a bike in their shed or garage that is unloved and unused. Just ask around on social media and one will fall in your lap...


6

Since I exclusively ride cleated pedals, what I always do whenever I need to come to a full stop is to shift to a low enough gear (on flats I'd shift to 34/21 or 34/23 -- I have a 'compact', ie. 50/34 crank), unclip my left foot, brake, then as I come to a stop, I shift my body towards the top tube and stand over it with my left foot on the ground. Usually ...


6

Bullying I am assuming that you are female, given that your screen name is Michelle. While there can be many suggestions about safe riding, the main point here is that these (male?) drivers are just bullying you. Plain and simple. One solution some cyclists use is to carry an obvious helmet camera, so that their behavior is witnessed. Edit: on ...


6

I used to get snakebites like crazy doing urban riding, even running really high pressures. I'm a big guy. What finally helped was running higher volume tires and wider. See if you can fit a wider tire in your frame, and look at getting some wider rims. Increasing the volume of air adds more cushioning. As Batman mentioned, going tubeless also helps, since ...


5

Cars overtaking too closely is often down to the width of the road (ref): For a cyclist to be safely overtaken, the width required depends upon the width of the overtaking vehicle but in general a lane width of 4m is needed. For widths of between 3 and 4m the cyclist will be 'squeezed'. Road widths less than 3m ensure the overtaking vehicle must wait ...


5

The single most important thing to know about cycling in London is never ride on the left side of a turning large vehicle, especially an articulated lorry or bendy bus. Many of the cycling fatalities in London are cyclists who ride up the outside of a large vehicle trying to negotiate a corner. Really an important rule for cycling anywhere.


5

A lot of this comes down to personal preference, but if you plan on hauling stuff I would go with a traditional framed single speed/fixed gear. Just make sure it has mounting points for a rear rack so you can run panniers in case you want to haul lots of stuff without putting it all on your back. You can mount a rack to a bike that doesn't have mounting ...


5

Marseille was voted worst French city for cyclist in 2013 (see here), but apparently they are trying to change that. Here are potentially useful links: maps of cycle lanes in the city, and a city bike rental scheme run by the city. You should keep the following in mind also: Marseille gets very hot in the summer and is one of the worst French city for air ...


5

Fatigue indicates you are using the muscle, so you will need to “check into” yourself to see how/why you are firing your forearm muscle, what task is it trying to accomplish. Sometimes we just have some odd or peculiar habits we are unaware we are doing. For example, my wife used to complain about wrist and hand pain when riding her flat bar commute bike ...


4

For that distance on flat roads it doesn't matter. Just get whatever you like, is comfortable to ride, and will be capable of carrying whatever you might need to carry. (I suggest a rack and baskets or panniers rather than a backpack, but that's a personal thing.) For your budget and needs look for a nice used bike. Especially since you've not ridden ...


4

I concur with PeteH's answer, with the caveat that local bike cultures, and certainly individual bike shops, can sometimes skew heavily in the direction of a specific kind of riding or a specific kind of rider... who may not be you. So it's completely fine to walk out of a local bike shop that treats you like something you'd scrape off the bottom of your ...


4

So, if your kids are like most, they are going to be hard on bikes. They will jump off curbs, do wheelies, and likely toss them to the ground when they dismount. I recommend something that will take a bit of abuse. A bmx will take a beating but it is an awful commuter bike. Beach cruisers are not much better - and they won't take the abuse. I recommend a ...


4

Our LBS has a Saturday morning ride for which we often get beginners. Many are no longer young and not particularly fit. They can do 17 miles of flat ride before lunch. I wouldn't worry about the amount of exercise if you have a nice break in the middle. Discomfort after that much riding is more of a worry. Allow enough time, about two hours each way ...


4

I typically tell people that any normal healthy novice can get on a bicycle and do 10 miles per hour without difficulty, so if you can walk for two hours stop for lunch and walk back, then you can do this with less work. Pack water, a cellphone and lunch money. If things go wrong you can put the bike in the boot of a cab.


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