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22

Most US State and Local laws are based on the Uniform Vehicle Code and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) guidelines. They will normally have a phrase like: Where sidewalks are provided, it shall be unlawful for any pedestrian to walk along and upon an adjacent roadway. And a phrase like: Where sidewalks are ...


15

The 3 foot law is an example of a law that exists mostly to create awareness rather than having some direct practical function. This law is rarely enforced by itself. Can anyone cite an instance where a motorist was ticketed for passing in under three feet (and not ticketed for anything else)? The 3-foot law is, AFAIK, typically enforced as a supplement to ...


9

In the case of a one way street, the implication is that you "may" ride (not must ride) close to the left hand curb. If you are traveling in the direction of traffic, this allows you to complete a left hand turn in a safe and sane manner. The provision in California Vehicle Code Section 21200(a), listed below, makes clear that a bicycle on the street is ...


9

Flashing yellow arrows have been introduced in the US recently to help ease congestion at intersections. This signal should be treated similar to a yield sign or a turn lane not controlled by its own traffic signal. If there is no oncoming traffic, you may make a left turn if it is safe to do so, but you must yield to any oncoming traffic and to any ...


9

Its to control the size of the field. The number of categories grows as the number of riders increases. This is so that you split people by ability more (for better consistency) and keep the fields sufficiently small. There just happen to be more men than women. If the number of women increase to be unwieldly with 4 categories, they'll presumably add a cat ...


8

Yeah, in theory you should ride near the left edge of the right lane (if multi-lane) until you get near your exit point, at which time you mosey to the right -- "own your lane". This is basically the same way you should ride on a road with shoulder when the shoulder converts to a turn lane. In practice, I suspect I'd be tempted to stop, dismantle my bike, ...


8

Three feet just seems (to legislators) like a reasonable number (it's 1 meter in the UK and I think most of Europe). And I know it's the law in Minnesota. Don't know about any other states. Would a different number make more sense? Probably not. Less would be out-and-out dangerous, and more would create the situation where the bike (in theory) blocks ...


8

In the US, you generally expect bicycles to get cheaper towards October/November, rather than May/June/July. Everyone wants to buy a bicycle when Spring gets nice and Summer. Then, they'll ride a few days in the fall and put the bike away in winter. So, sales tend to decline in the Fall/Winter (and the deals come out), so looking in Fall is probably the ...


8

Answer (tl;dr) Find another route. I checked around using google street view to get the image in the question. Some observations... There are no cyclists visible anywhere. There are also no motorcyclists I noticed. The lighting is poor and patchy Many of the vehicles travelling the lower deck do not have lights on. The road surface is patchy and ...


7

Found this thread as I was looking for the same answer for the legality of pedestrian running on the bike lane with a perfectly good sidewalk next to them. Since I have not seen this being answered here, I'll post what I found from California's DMV. Pedestrian in Bicycle Lane 21966. No pedestrian shall proceed along a bicycle path or lane where ...


6

US law is state dependent, but generally, if you're a bicycle on the road, you're considered equivalent to a motor vehicle. If you're a bicycle on a sidewalk, you follow the rules for people on sidewalks (this isn't always permitted depending on area). For example, to quote the New Jersey driver's manual, for a controlled intersection: An intersection is ...


5

This depends on the direction that they are running in. Due to bicycles being silent, cycling having priority in the bike lanes and runners not having eyes in the back of their heads, they should be running the 'wrong way', towards rather than with bike traffic. In that way they can hop out of the way of oncoming cycle traffic. Clearly there is no way short ...


5

I would be in favor of waiting until you move. There is the possible problem of needing service work under warranty and the nearest dealer being some distance away. You must also factor in the shipping cost along with the expense of disassembly and reassembly if you can't do it yourself. There is also no better way to start a good relationship with your ...


5

No, it's not a good idea If you said that you see many cyclists every time you drive there, then that would be a route to consider. But you see only a few cyclists. The Wikipedia page says the lower level [is] for through-traffic and trucks servicing buildings on the road Forget it. Find a route cyclists use. Your first priority should be to survive ...


5

According to the League of American Bicyclists, the following communities in the Southwest USA have gold level like Seattle does (no community in the Southwest has Platinum, and none in the USA have Diamond): Carbondale, Colorado Durango, Colorado Park City, Utah* Santa Cruz, California Scottsdale, Arizona Steamboat Springs, Colorado* Tempe, Arizona Tuscon,...


4

Pennsylvania's got a new four-foot law. It was recently enforced after an attempted hit-and-run in Bethlehem, PA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7AVC1YCcO0). (I should clarify that it was a hit-and-attempted-run, as other motorists pinned the driver in to prevent him from running).


4

Kind of what Daniel said, brakes are easy. Sit down and think about it for a minute, all you have to do is switch the cables. Run the front cable to the left and run the rear cable to the right. If you want to switch the shifters you will probably run into some trouble. You won't be able to just switch the cables, you would have to get shifters that work on ...


4

Is there any bike insurance which covers both bike and life? The short answer to this is "yes". Is there any bike insurance which also covers rental biking? The short answer to this is "not that I know of". The longer answers... In general in the US, casualty (theft/loss), liability (payment to others when you are at fault), life, and health insurance ...


4

Welcome to the Bay Area! First, you should become a member of Bike East Bay - they provide advocacy as well as produce bike trail maps for the east bay. Being a member gets you a discount at most east bay bike stores. Second, the gravel trails around here are all fairly gentle in terms of terrain except for some steep hills. You could do them all with a ...


4

Gravel riding does not have to involve getting over 'technical' obstacles on the bike, although even on straightforward trails you may find you have to carry the bike over obstacles such as mud, steps or stream crossings. It's good to ride with others to get to know trails and techniques and have some technical backup, plus it's just good to ride with ...


3

Personally, I just try to take up the whole lane when in the roundabouts, so drivers don't have any reason to think that I'm exiting when I'm not. However, the roundabouts that I traverse on are almost completely devoid of traffic. I think some motorists might get angry with a bike taking up a whole lane (not that they should). Anyway, the rules in my ...


3

The simple awnser to your question is no. However their are a few other nations that have well established bike lock reviewer's, including "Thatcham and Sold Secure in the United Kingdom, ART in the Netherlands, SSF in Sweden, and VDS in Germany" (1) With this in mind I'd suggest considering that individual bike lock brands will likely have their own ...


3

If it's from one of the big brands (Trek, Specialized, Giant etc.) then you should be fine. Only difference between one bought in the UK and one in the US would be brakes mounted opposite way round (i.e. front brake operated by left lever rather than the right), and maybe paintjob!


3

You can get a printed map from Minneapolis Parks & Recreation Board office: 2117 West River Road Or, you can call 612-230-6400 or email info@minneapolisparks.org and they’ll send you one. http://wwwdocs.minneapolismn.gov/bike/index.html shows all the bike stuff might be overly detailed. Apparently its well signposted with maps on the way. They're ...


3

About me - I live in downtown Chicago and have been riding seriously in the city for 10 plus years, for most of the year, multiple days per week. For the last 2 years, I have been walking to and fro work each morning mostly down upper Wacker for the bulk of the way. I come home for lunch on the same route, and then back to the office in River North. I ...


2

According to the MTA, bikes can go on trains, only folding bikes can go on buses. From http://www.mta.info/bike/: NYC Transit Subway Bicycles are permitted on Subway trains at all times. However, we strongly recommend that cyclists avoid boarding crowded rush hour trains. Be courteous to your fellow passengers by standing with your bike, moving it ...


2

One option that works well for me is using a belly band holster and a Ruger Lcp. It hides easily under my cycling jerseys and is comfortable and secure even on 70+ mile rides in the heat of summer. The only real issue is that the sweat can corrode the non stainless slide and spare magazine. If you can spring for it get your slide and magazine covered at ...


2

I know that some manufacturers, like Kryptonite have systems that they assign their own locks, but I do not believe there is an independent rating agency in the United States.


2

While New York City is at the moment quite bike-friendly, potholes, cracks, and patched roads are still problems. Unfortunately, there seems to be no single resource for finding smooth roads in the city. The best you can do may be to rely on information from several sources, and use your own experience to decide on how to use the information. Google Maps ...


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