8

Twenty-plus year old STIs that really and truly have much life left are rare and expensive. The 7700 STIs are much more serviceable than most, hypothetically. They allow some make-one-good-one-from-two-bad-ones type stuff to be done where it's not practical otherwise. In practice most of them are trashed by now. The wear parts on pre-Escape Ergo are all ...


8

This is the classic "how long is a piece of string" question, where almost any answer is valid. At one end you have a frame. And enough skills and time to assemble a bike, along with the desire/need. If you can source every part you need from your spares boxes, then the cost is nothing more than your time. On the other end if all you have is a ...


7

I agree with Jeff that you are most likely looking at paint chips. The thing to look for in surface damage is torn fibers. To recap, carbon fiber is made from sheets of carbon fiber that are impregnated with resin. The structure is cured in a mold at high temperature and pressure. You need the fibers to be torn for the structure to be compromised. Damage to ...


7

These appear to be paint chips in areas of the bike where rock strikes are common. I don't see any evidence of delamination--a separation of the carbon fiber weave and thus carbon fiber damage. However, no amount of photo inspection can replace a hands on one. Were I to purchase a carbon fiber second hand, I would have a second opinion of the carbon fiber ...


4

I've finished a bike to nearly your exact specifications. I came into a Trek navigator 300 frame that I've converted as my "Grocery Touring" bike. Although I've taken curbed bikes and fixed them up for friends as a hobby, building a bike from scratch is much more rewarding and can be cost effective with some patience. I got impatient with ...


3

A current 105 will almost surely be much better. A lot of improvement happened in those two decades. Even 105 is now 11 speed. Even though the top manufacturing processes with the stringiest tolerances may not be used for 105, it is still manufactured very well and uses good features introduced later. It will allow modern cassettes with larger gear ranges, ...


2

Looks like a great candidate for a rebuild and learning experience. The sticker on the downtube clearly says "CroMo" meaning an alloy of steel with trace amounts of chromium, manganese and molybdenum. Either way its still steel, but a different alloy. I have a concern in the stem - it looks to be very far out of the threaded headset, so do check ...


2

Focusing solely on Campagnolo compatibility: if you get an 8-10s Campagnolo groupset, it will require a different freehub body than Shimano wheels. In fact, 8s Campagnolo groups may require a different freehub standard than 9s and subsequent groups (although all 9s and later Campy groups except for the current generation Campagnolo Ekar use the same freehub ...


1

I'll approach the question by taking the listed parameters and offering some thoughts as to time/cost/ money. Overall, building up a working bicycle from a bare--or nearly so--frame is extremely satisfying experience interspersed with periods of frustration, disappointment and sometimes boredom when a project drags on too long (& who's to say what that ...


1

I would just be careful you know what you are getting yourself into. At the end of the day any older bike from that era will be heavier than modern carbon fiber and possibly aluminum bike, probably have less range on gears/bigger jumps in gearing, have less aero, and may not accept modern road wheels. I am a big proponent of a rider focusing on fitness ...


1

If you want fast with older components, you may want to consider a fixed-gear road bike. I'm adding this because it at least deserves a mention. It may take you a bit of experimenting to find the highest comfortable gear ratio for your area, but the weight savings gained by eliminating brakes, multiple chain rings, derailleurs, shifters and extra chain ...


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