12

Aluminum has gotten a bit of a bad reputation from the early generation of frames which were overly stiff. This is less the case today as manufacturing technology fixed most of these earlier problems, and bicycle designers can create formed aluminum tubes that provide compliance (i.e., vibration absorption) in one direction (e.g., vertical compliance) and ...


6

I have an aluminium bike with a rubber dampener built into the handle bar, it's part of Specializeds range, not sure if there are general versions. A suspension fork would iron out more bumps than a carbon one, but may not fit your bike. I've taken videos from a handlebar mounted camera too and I think there will always be a lot of jolting that is ...


5

It's important to remember that while your mom would kill you if the bike breaks, she would be so much more upset if you did get hurt! Moms are weird like that, so don't be afraid to ask her for help with the bike, or money if something important needs fixing. So how to fix the bike, we need to figure out why the vibration is happening, so that means ...


4

In theory, wider (and possibly thicker) tires ought to help though that may be anathema on a road bike. E.g. I have a aluminium "hybrid" without suspension, with 700x32 Marathon Plus tires, which don't seem to me especially "buzzy" (I do like padded gloves though). If the tires were e.g. 32mm instead of your 25mm, that means the contact patch is bigger ...


3

Thanks so much for the answer. I found the problem! So I had crashed a while ago, and soon after the problem started. I discovered that the back tire was off-kilter and rubbed against the frame of the bike which slowed me down and made excessive annoying noise. I found out when the tire just got caught on the frame and stopped moving entirely. We loosened ...


2

Besides double taping the handlebar, the wider the tires the less pressure you can use: from http://oaksandspokes.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/pressurechart121405B.jpg Also you can use slightly less pressure in the front tire than in the rear because this is the one that bears most of the weight, for example: your could try 87 psi in the rear and 80 psi ...


2

For your hands, doubling up on padded bar tape is a cheap solution which a lot of the pros will do when racing cobblestone or bumpy roads. For video, I'd opt for an inexpensive helmet mount (straps preferably but sticky pads do work) but if you've got cash to burn then you could look at either a bike or chest mounted gimbal which will produce smooth video ...


2

Old question I know but still relevant, to reduce/eliminate the gopro shakiness try a k-edge or similar solid, one piece mount. I tried all of the mounts shown above with poor results before trying the k-edge out front mount which secures tightly to the bars & provides excellent quality footage. There are too many moving parts in the gopro mounts & ...


2

I got the same with my new COVID-Kickr, in my case it was simply the alignment of the cassette/trainer with respect to the frame/rear-derailleur/chainline. For whatever reason the usual stops in the frame that ensured same/similar alignment when mounting the wheel just wasn't quite right for the trainer (skewer QR system here). It's hard to notice as ...


2

Vibrations can have multiple causes. Common sources of vibration is a wheel or tire being out of round, a wheel being out of out of true or a wheel being out of balance. If the tire was mounted in such a way that it is not an equal distance from the rim, this can cause the wheel as a whole to be out of round (i.e., a “hop”), which will be felt as ...


2

It is hard to say for sure how threadlocker gets pre-applied on bolts at factories (most likely not by hand, but who knows). However, its polymerization happens after contacting the metal, not because of drying on air. From the Wikipedia article: Most thread-locking formulas are methacrylate-based and rely on the electrochemical activity of a metal ...


1

I'm guessing you might have the opposite of the problem that Stanley P mentions -- your hub bearings could be too loose. Simple test: With the bike off the ground grasp the tire and attempt to move it side-to side. If you see/feel any "rattle" in the bearings then they are too loose. With some "slow release" style hubs it's fairly easy to get the bearing ...


1

I wonder if there’s a tight spot in the chain, caused by stiff links or cog/chainring tolerances. Rotate the wheel slowly and find the spot where the rim pulls to the side. Now check the chain tension with the cranks in and around this position. If it is very taut then it could be pulling the wheel to the side every time the cranks hit this position. You ...


1

The axle is a single piece and it has 2 functions. The first is to secure the bike to the frame but it is also the stationary part of the hub that transfers the forces on the frame to the wheel through the wheel bearings. Since the axle is a single piece, Tightening the frame to axle bolts could be tightening the hub to bearing torque. The wheel will feel ...


1

Generally you can squirt some liquid lube in the pedal axle and it eventually wicks its way to the bearings on the inside. However this won't do much for bearings on the outside end of the axle. Some pedals can be disassembled for servicing and ball replacement, depends totally on what your pedals look like. We can tell you more if you post a clear sharp ...


1

Updated - I have fitted two layers of new bartape in the hooks, and one layer elsewhere. Padded gloves were moderately effective, but came with new problems like sunburned wrists and blisters on the web between my fingers. So I still wear my $4 gardening gloves but with the padded half gloves over the top. The camera is still poor at night, but the image ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible