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29

Although I support keeping older bikes in circulation in general, this particular bike comes with some caveats. One of my riding buddies had a very similar bike. The Vitus 979 is a bonded aluminum frame with small-diameter tubes. It was notoriously flexible when new. It was rumored that Sean Kelly, who raced on one of these, had to replace his fork after ...


23

It appears to be a clamp-on pump peg that got moved down out of the way either intentionally or from coming loose.


19

Depends what is your goal, but personally, I'd go for the modern one. Maybe for this budget, you can find something second hand with Shimano 105, that would be also an option. The reasons are: weight is a secondary concern, unless you are in competition and are looking for 1/10th of seconds (and other parameters are similar). The weight that matters is the ...


13

Are you sure the upper part has not been sliding down such that we can really take a clue from the distance between the two parts? I suspect that the two parts of the fixture are meant to hold an air pump with the upper part having come down. On modern bikes the fixtures rely on a spring as part of the pump to secure it between the two pegs. It looks like ...


12

No, as offered by @NoCo, is the correct answer. This merely offers some additional information. When you're talking about "normal tires," you mean clincher tires with tubes. These will require new wheels. Unfortunately, if you bought a 1980s bike, you may have an older standard rear wheel - current bikes are 130mm in the rear dropouts, as are ...


12

It's a rather nice looking functional bike with probably a 3-speed hub. It seems rather a shame to turn something that's quite attractive and functional into a piece to survive the weather/seasons in your garden. There may or may not be a "collector" market for this bike; my opinion is that this type of bike doesn't usually carry a huge value and ...


11

Upgrading an older bike is typically not economical. Parts are typically not cheaper. Parts are not as available. That drivetrain is not compatible with a modern bike. Bikes have gotten better. Little faster, lighter, more comfortable, and easier to service. You can find decent to nice newer model used bikes for $400. Find someone that bought an $800 ...


11

I'll weigh in as the single person in this thread who actually seems to have ridden, and owned, multiple Vituses. I love them, always have, mainly for their history, their gorgeous looks, their light weight. I ride my current one in blue daily, as a city bike, have for several years. As a relatively inexpensive mid-range frame, it handles nimbly, and the ...


10

That is a tire liner. I think http://sheldonbrown.com/flats.html is good reading on the topic of liners / flats in general - in particular, he generally doesn't recommend them (and I don't either). He also claims that if they're improperly installed, they can increase the frequency of flats. If you are prone to flats and you've eliminated improper ...


10

There are three common causes for erratic steering at low speed. A possible cause, but the least likely, is that the head stem is too tight. When not on the bike try turning the handlebars. If the movement feels "lumpy" then it needs adjustment. Riding a bike that has more aggressive geometry than we're used to. You could try borrowing a shopping bike (...


10

Why produce a heavy but durable carbon frame if one can have a heavy and durable steel frame that is cheaper? Apparently there are no (mass) buyers for such technology. The bicycle industry is mainly driven by the competitive cycling needs, whether it is good or bad for a regular consumer. The choice of frame material is driven by the material properties ...


10

The derailleur in the second picture does not look over extended. If the derailleur has some movement left in that position then it's OK. If it's up against the limits and is being bent then you will need to lengthen the chain. Just for future reference, you should size a chain using a proper procedure: Thread the chain around largest sprocket and chainring ...


10

I think this answers your question. Your headbadge is slightly different, probably older. See also https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunbeam_Cycles Also http://historywebsite.co.uk/Museum/Transport/bicycles/Sunbeam.htm


9

No. Older bicycles are no harder to work on than modern bicycles provided you have specialized knowledge regarding older standards, possibly specialized tools and the ability to obtain parts designed for older standards. Generally a bicycle built now will likely conform to a set of standards that are common and in place now. If you bought a bike today, ...


9

This is not a complete answer, but one factor certainly is that nowadays bikes often use powder coating as their finish, rather than liquid paint. Powder coating has signifcant advantages over paint (more resilient coating, no risk of running, no solvents required), but the surface characteristics are different. In particular, the sparkle effect of metallic ...


9

Some things i would consider, some could possibly be grouped together. Perhaps others can add on with more answers. Custom Class Originality/Creativity Function *Can you actually ride it semi comfortably or is it just cool looking *Can it do something normal bikes can't? Use of colors or materials (could lump into creativity) Wow factor Overall theme ...


9

Is there a small hole that was covered by the ring? If so it covers a lubrication port. Many old Raleigh, and other utility type hubs came with such a port.


9

This is often called "the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades" which can get expensive quickly. There are two simple and relatively cheap upgrades to try. Replace the brake pad inserts with modern compound Kool Stop. They will brake better than the original ones, which may also be a bit hardened with age. There will be a model that fits your brake pad ...


9

If you are planning to ride the bike, replace the handlebar stem


9

No, that person was confused and you have it right. A new 700x25 tire will fit the same as what you have. Often 40 year old wheels will need new rim strips while you're at it.


9

Aluminum has no fatigue limit and thus it is impossible to make an aluminum bike part that won't fail with enough use. Fatigue accumulates with load, not time. Good forged cranks with designs that avoid stress risers in the spider area tend to be pretty good at resisting fatigue failures more or less indefinitely in practice. Weight weenie designs and bad ...


9

They haven't https://www.schwalbe.com/en/mtb-reader/eddy-current-rear "FRONT: • Reliable cornering grip paired with high braking traction. • Excellent transmission of steering corrections throughlong grip edges even when less weight is on the front wheel in ascents. The result: Understeer is more controllable. REAR: • Maximum propulsion and braking ...


9

Thanks to Criggie's sharp eyes spotting the word "Coventry" From a forum thread here is a match on the head badge The decals on the bike look similar but the lug work looks different. Here is a nice example in the wild The 2020 post says the bike is 37 years old so 1983


8

Apparently those are "Stop Flat Liners"... and the consensus at bikeforums is that they work well (as i inadvertently learned) Think i will keep them and get cheap sleeks. may also get a pair for the other bike.


8

I would recommend doing two things: Reassemble the hub with the thickest grease you can find (within reason). It might slow you down a little, but it will help the bearings last as long as possible. Make a mark on the back side of the cone that corresponds to where the damage is. When you're putting the wheel on, rotate the axle so that the damaged side of ...


8

Looks like 70s Schauff Elite. Compare it with bike here, the frame has very distinct shapes. A similar bike is also listed at the official (correct me if I'm wrong) Schauff website, the picture under number 28.


8

If you just want a reliable, more comfortable, more efficient and safer bike - just buy a new one. Upgrading older bikes (or even new bikes) requires and investment in time and money: learning about all the different standards in use and parts compatibility, buying special tools, scouring Ebay for parts etc. However, if that is your idea of fun then by all ...


8

If I were buying a vintage frame (and assuming that it fits), I would generally be more inclined to buy a steel one. I'm not a vintage expert, but the Vitus 979 appears to be an early aluminum frame. In theory, aluminum has a finite fatigue life, whereas steel, titanium, and carbon do not (assuming equal quality control on the materials and frame ...


7

See "J.C. Higgins Girls Flightliner" on this page. Perhaps not the exact bike, but quite close. And I think Western Auto was also fond of the "tank" between the bars.


7

First, try to find a modern wheel that's the right size. They are still made and you can get very shiny ones that will match the bike very nicely. Or get a 120mm fixie hub and add 3mm of spacers each side. If you must use a modern wheel, try to shrink your hub. Many hubs have washers between the locknuts and cones, or other spacers. If you can remove even a ...


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