Hot answers tagged

22

It appears to be a clamp-on pump peg that got moved down out of the way either intentionally or from coming loose.


12

No, as offered by @NoCo, is the correct answer. This merely offers some additional information. When you're talking about "normal tires," you mean clincher tires with tubes. These will require new wheels. Unfortunately, if you bought a 1980s bike, you may have an older standard rear wheel - current bikes are 130mm in the rear dropouts, as are current rear ...


11

Upgrading an older bike is typically not economical. Parts are typically not cheaper. Parts are not as available. That drivetrain is not compatible with a modern bike. Bikes have gotten better. Little faster, lighter, more comfortable, and easier to service. You can find decent to nice newer model used bikes for $400. Find someone that bought an $800 ...


10

That is a tire liner. I think http://sheldonbrown.com/flats.html is good reading on the topic of liners / flats in general - in particular, he generally doesn't recommend them (and I don't either). He also claims that if they're improperly installed, they can increase the frequency of flats. If you are prone to flats and you've eliminated improper ...


10

Are you sure the upper part has not been sliding down such that we can really take a clue from the distance between the two parts? I suspect that the two parts of the fixture are meant to hold an air pump with the upper part having come down. On modern bikes the fixtures rely on a spring as part of the pump to secure it between the two pegs. It looks like ...


10

Why produce a heavy but durable carbon frame if one can have a heavy and durable steel frame that is cheaper? Apparently there are no (mass) buyers for such technology. The bicycle industry is mainly driven by the competitive cycling needs, whether it is good or bad for a regular consumer. The choice of frame material is driven by the material properties ...


10

The derailleur in the second picture does not look over extended. If the derailleur has some movement left in that position then it's OK. If it's up against the limits and is being bent then you will need to lengthen the chain. Just for future reference, you should size a chain using a proper procedure: Thread the chain around largest sprocket and chainring ...


9

No. Older bicycles are no harder to work on than modern bicycles provided you have specialized knowledge regarding older standards, possibly specialized tools and the ability to obtain parts designed for older standards. Generally a bicycle built now will likely conform to a set of standards that are common and in place now. If you bought a bike today, ...


9

This is not a complete answer, but one factor certainly is that nowadays bikes often use powder coating as their finish, rather than liquid paint. Powder coating has signifcant advantages over paint (more resilient coating, no risk of running, no solvents required), but the surface characteristics are different. In particular, the sparkle effect of metallic ...


9

There are three common causes for erratic steering at low speed. A possible cause, but the least likely, is that the head stem is too tight. When not on the bike try turning the handlebars. If the movement feels "lumpy" then it needs adjustment. Riding a bike that has more aggressive geometry than we're used to. You could try borrowing a shopping bike (...


9

Some things i would consider, some could possibly be grouped together. Perhaps others can add on with more answers. Custom Class Originality/Creativity Function *Can you actually ride it semi comfortably or is it just cool looking *Can it do something normal bikes can't? Use of colors or materials (could lump into creativity) Wow factor Overall theme ...


9

Is there a small hole that was covered by the ring? If so it covers a lubrication port. Many old Raleigh, and other utility type hubs came with such a port.


9

This is often called "the slippery slope of knock-on upgrades" which can get expensive quickly. There are two simple and relatively cheap upgrades to try. Replace the brake pad inserts with modern compound Kool Stop. They will brake better than the original ones, which may also be a bit hardened with age. There will be a model that fits your brake pad ...


8

Apparently those are "Stop Flat Liners"... and the consensus at bikeforums is that they work well (as i inadvertently learned) Think i will keep them and get cheap sleeks. may also get a pair for the other bike.


8

Looks like 70s Schauff Elite. Compare it with bike here, the frame has very distinct shapes. A similar bike is also listed at the official (correct me if I'm wrong) Schauff website, the picture under number 28.


8

If you just want a reliable, more comfortable, more efficient and safer bike - just buy a new one. Upgrading older bikes (or even new bikes) requires and investment in time and money: learning about all the different standards in use and parts compatibility, buying special tools, scouring Ebay for parts etc. However, if that is your idea of fun then by all ...


8

If you are planning to ride the bike, replace the handlebar stem


7

See "J.C. Higgins Girls Flightliner" on this page. Perhaps not the exact bike, but quite close. And I think Western Auto was also fond of the "tank" between the bars.


7

For road bikes of that age, showing just "a fistful of seat post" was considered good frame fit and style. Otherwise the frame was likely too small for the rider. Of course that was before the advent of sloping top tubes. If the bottom bracket is not too high, stand over height of the top tube should be no problem even with such small seat post extension.


7

It is relatively simple to find parts to fit old bikes. Things have changed a lot but there are still enough old bikes out there that you will not have a difficult time getting replacement chains, cogsets, derailers, wheels, bottom brackets, wheel bearings, seat posts, stems, headsets, or anything else. Any gaps in what is available can likely be filled by a ...


7

I'm 68 - a few years younger. I picked up cycling 6 months ago after a near 50 year break. I have mild MS and a balance problem. As Andy and others have mentioned - practice, practice. The balance issue will go away - it will seem automatic and you will never think about it. When I first started again it was fortunate to stumble upon a large hybrid comfort ...


7

Answer: Its not worth doing, from a financial stand point. Adding disk brakes to a frame is expensive, risky, and ruins any vintage value the frame had. The stays are not engineered or designed for the new sideways loading. Also, you talk about stays, but braking on the rear wheel is nowhere near as good as braking on the front. If you're dead-keen ...


7

You need a stepped shift ferrule. You have no reasonable options if you're using compressionless shift housing. On the left is a picture of a 5mm to 4mm one, which Jagwire is the main remaining producer of. On the right is the Shimano 4mm one, which in my experience is the commonly encountered one for 4mm housing. There are Campy ones too, but I think they ...


7

No. Tubular rims only work with tubular tires which must be glued or taped on. (added "taped" to be more complete)


6

I did this just last year. It's not a hard upgrade. You'll need to replace the bottom bracket and crankset. With a bike of that age, depending on the make, it might be difficult to find a modern bottom bracket that can fit your bike. Take it to the local bike store to determine the shell width, or measure with your current one. This requires being pretty ...


6

First, try to find a modern wheel that's the right size. They are still made and you can get very shiny ones that will match the bike very nicely. Or get a 120mm fixie hub and add 3mm of spacers each side. If you must use a modern wheel, try to shrink your hub. Many hubs have washers between the locknuts and cones, or other spacers. If you can remove even a ...


6

I would recommend doing two things: Reassemble the hub with the thickest grease you can find (within reason). It might slow you down a little, but it will help the bearings last as long as possible. Make a mark on the back side of the cone that corresponds to where the damage is. When you're putting the wheel on, rotate the axle so that the damaged side of ...


6

Your 26" tires sit on wheel rims, whose diameter is probably 559 mm. 24" tires will not fit onto these rims; to use 24" "junior" tires you actually need smaller wheels, of a 507 mm diameter. These smaller wheels require a different frame. Smaller rims require a different frame mainly because hardware related to the wheel which is mounted to the larger frame ...


6

Cleaning a vintage bike isn't that much different than cleaning a new bike, with perhaps two caveats: Vintage bikes are usually made of steel and the frame drain holes may be plugged or non-existent. I wouldn't use water directly (from a hose) directly on a vintage bike but instead only use wet rags and wipes. Don't spray (citrus-based) cleaner directly on ...


6

I believe I have that same crank on a roughly 1983 Schwinn World Sport (see image). I got it used, so I don't know if it was the original, but in any case, mine has 40 teeth on the small ring and 52 on the big ring, so that's likely the size you're looking for. That said, it might be easier to find a replacement for the entire crank+chain rings rather than ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible