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29

Although I support keeping older bikes in circulation in general, this particular bike comes with some caveats. One of my riding buddies had a very similar bike. The Vitus 979 is a bonded aluminum frame with small-diameter tubes. It was notoriously flexible when new. It was rumored that Sean Kelly, who raced on one of these, had to replace his fork after ...


19

Depends what is your goal, but personally, I'd go for the modern one. Maybe for this budget, you can find something second hand with Shimano 105, that would be also an option. The reasons are: weight is a secondary concern, unless you are in competition and are looking for 1/10th of seconds (and other parameters are similar). The weight that matters is the ...


12

It's a rather nice looking functional bike with probably a 3-speed hub. It seems rather a shame to turn something that's quite attractive and functional into a piece to survive the weather/seasons in your garden. There may or may not be a "collector" market for this bike; my opinion is that this type of bike doesn't usually carry a huge value and ...


11

I'll weigh in as the single person in this thread who actually seems to have ridden, and owned, multiple Vituses. I love them, always have, mainly for their history, their gorgeous looks, their light weight. I ride my current one in blue daily, as a city bike, have for several years. As a relatively inexpensive mid-range frame, it handles nimbly, and the ...


10

I think this answers your question. Your headbadge is slightly different, probably older. See also https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunbeam_Cycles Also http://historywebsite.co.uk/Museum/Transport/bicycles/Sunbeam.htm


9

They haven't https://www.schwalbe.com/en/mtb-reader/eddy-current-rear "FRONT: • Reliable cornering grip paired with high braking traction. • Excellent transmission of steering corrections throughlong grip edges even when less weight is on the front wheel in ascents. The result: Understeer is more controllable. REAR: • Maximum propulsion and braking ...


9

Aluminum has no fatigue limit and thus it is impossible to make an aluminum bike part that won't fail with enough use. Fatigue accumulates with load, not time. Good forged cranks with designs that avoid stress risers in the spider area tend to be pretty good at resisting fatigue failures more or less indefinitely in practice. Weight weenie designs and bad ...


9

Thanks to Criggie's sharp eyes spotting the word "Coventry" From a forum thread here is a match on the head badge The decals on the bike look similar but the lug work looks different. Here is a nice example in the wild The 2020 post says the bike is 37 years old so 1983


8

If I were buying a vintage frame (and assuming that it fits), I would generally be more inclined to buy a steel one. I'm not a vintage expert, but the Vitus 979 appears to be an early aluminum frame. In theory, aluminum has a finite fatigue life, whereas steel, titanium, and carbon do not (assuming equal quality control on the materials and frame ...


7

I suggest you stop using a spanner. That way leads to damaged parts, damaged knuckles, and tears. Instead, get a socket of the correct size, and a ratchet bar to turn it. Finally, have a good look at the visible threads and make sure you're turning it the right way, which will be the same turning direction used to remove the locknut. You can do this, just ...


6

Rico was a bicycle manufacturer from Switzerland (Wallisellen, a town near Zurich). Rico PF means "Rico - Paul Fries". You can check some badges on the swiss auction sites, to try to pinpoint the production year. For example: https://www.ricardo.ch/de/a/rico-velo-rad-marken-schild-wallisellen-1070171586/ (in the description it says it is from the ...


6

This may not be the info you expect, but for your purposes, it doesn't matter at all. Your mother wants to ride again, and that's fantastically awesome. Anything that progresses the goal nearer to completion is good. I suggest you find out if she had a bike in the past, what brand it was, what colour, and anything she remembers about it. Perhaps conscript ...


6

I have a peugeot frame of a similar age and have found it to be more bother than its worth. There was a period when peugeot made an effort to make all of their compenent dimensions round metric numbers. This practice was not adopted by many other manufacturers so getting parts to fit that frame might be a hassle. On my peugeot frame; Steering tube internal ...


6

This is simply not true. Many high range MTB tires are specifically designated for front or back usage, and practically all tire reviews mention that. Certain manufacturers have encoded the "front/back" purpose of their tires in their names. Maxxis Minion DHF is meant for front, while Maxxis Minion DHR is meant for the rear. Of course, many people ...


6

Near as I can tell from the posted pictures you have Maillard CXC pedals. My guess is that you have the 500 model that can't be repaired. "Baldy" has an account on his blog of working on the model 500 version, sadly he does not say how he will remove the "swaged-in bearings": It turns out the bearings are 'swaged' in at the outer edge ...


5

The usual way that old aluminum machine elements are "proven safe" is by nondestructive testing at specified intervals, to detect fatigue cracking before it causes the part to fail. The simplest method for looking for cracks in aluminum parts is the dye penetrant test; dye penetrant test kits are commercially available. One kit is good for a large ...


5

I see "Coventry" in the scratched out decals. The head tube badge appears to be an eagle, which is often associated with Germany and similar areas. "Cycle Shop Somerton" is probably a bike shop in Somerton, of which there are many, in the UK, US, and Australia according to Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somerton#Places A search ...


4

That looks to be the logo of Redline bicycles: https://www.redlinebicycles.com


4

The freehub attaches to the shell with a big hollow bolt you access by poking a 10mm allen into the drive side. You can transplant an HG freehub body onto it, ideally one of the same or similar length (6, 7, and 8-speed UG existed) and also a matching cone and other axle hardware for the drive side so that the sealing works right. The upside here is a ...


4

That's an awesome bike - would be called a MTB back in the day, but now we'd call it a rigid MTB. You probably have to replace the brake pads (the rubber blocks, 4 in total) because they go hard with age/ozone/UV and don't brake as well. That style of brake is called a cantilever and while less-common now, they can still work perfectly well when tweaked ...


4

We can't give a value as such, but in these days of C19, lockdown and disrupted supply lines, any working bike is of use to someone. You yourself might get value by riding it. You don't have to go all out, just a dawdle round the block or the local park. If you intend on growing vines or similar over the bike to obscure it, then perhaps an approximation of ...


3

The one tool that was most useful was KNOWLEDGE and knowing that the internal cup race was left-hand thread was the key to solving this. I never dreamed it would be backwards thread, because I was assuming this was the mounting bolt for the whole freehub body. The TL-FH40 code lead me to which described how to make the tool ...


3

Paolo, I don't know the make/model of your bike, but it seems clearly to be a standard design using standard components from perhaps the mid 20th century. For example Sturmy-Archer was famous for its 3-speed hub shifting system (like the one on your bike). Here's a brief history: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/sturmey-archer.html#history What level of ...


3

That's probably because this bike pre-dates the internet by decades. Anyone connected with the brand is likely a minimum age of 70, or has long since passed away. I have a similar `80s bike from Vincere and there is literally no information to be found anywhere. What we can see is a 1970s bike at the latest - the cranks are attached to the bottom bracket ...


3

If period correctness is not an issue, a modern cassette hub is the better choice. The problem with old freewheel design is that it puts the drive side bearings in the center of the axle where the weight of the rider can bend or break the axle. Modern hubs either put the bearings to the end of the axle or use an oversize axle that can take the load. Other ...


3

That's a nice enough bike, but it's not something to upgrade, you bought the wrong bike. Either you want a vintage bike in which case it sounds great, or you just want a road bike, in which case something with Shimano Claris R2000 would be suitable. Assuming you have 400EX, then this dates from 1990-1992. 600EX would be pre 1988, so it's possible you ...


3

I found this article about a slightly different bike: This bike was manufactured by Cleveland Welding (CWC) for distribution and sale by the Seiberling Rubber Company. It is essentially a standard issue CWC bike using the second series post-war CWC 3-Gill pattern frame and the serial number places the build date in 1947, probably near the middle of that ...


3

It looks like a well made steel frame that probably has good quality butted tubing and seems to be quite racy with a fairly tight geometry. Looking at the Campagnolo dropouts doesn't tell us much as they were in a long production over decades. The sloping fork crown and the recessed brake nuts date this to being an 80s or even early 90s race frame. The seat ...


3

I'm going to go against the grain a bit here, and say that you've got a great example of something from the dark ages of Italian bicycle manufacture. It is an early 90s bike. I know this because the phone number on the shop's sticker starts with an 01, dating it to after BT changed all the area codes. The welding is dreadful/ugly and while the bike will be ...


3

You shouldn't reduce any bike to dilapidated garbage in pursuit of a quaint or pastoral aesthetic. Doing so promotes the idea that bikes belong to a historical or economic context that is past or other, and thereby is implicitly anti-bicycle.


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