15

1. Wear hi-visibility color on your torso. That really bright yellow/green color is best. The orange is pretty good, too. I've seen stuff that's striped in both colors or is primarily one with a some bands of the other, and that seems like probably the best option, so that you still stand out against a background that matches the hi-viz color. Helmet ...


9

Helmet lights are good. Usually in addition to one on the handlebars. The pro of the helmet light is that you can light up things that are not directly infront of you. The pro of having an additional light is that it increases the chance of being seen and adds extra illumination for you. The con is that if you are looking to the side and a car is ...


8

I run The Bike Light Database (which started from a series of blog posts on this very Stack Exchange site). The Cygolite Hotshot and the NiteRider Solas are actually two of my top recommended lights, and I specifically recommend a setup similar to what you're describing. From the recommended taillights page: Putting the Cygolite Hotshot on your rack or ...


8

You would be entering in a very busy market with no obvious advantages. Let's look at the two types of LEDs that you might use: If you're using inexpensive and low-power 5050 LEDs (15 lumens@350mW; usually ganged in groups), then you could power the lights off button cells (two CR2032s would power one 5050 LED for about 3 hours; 3 x 5050s for one hour) but ...


7

Of course, having some good bright lights is a must for being visible at night! The Bicycles Stack Exchange Blog now has the most comprehensive bike taillight review on the internet (to our knowledge): Review of the Best Bicycle Tail Lights in 2012 In total I reviewed fifteen different tail lights. The Cygolite Hotshot performed best in the most categories,...


7

Something like this accessory is what you need: Can be fitted onto wired or meshed bicycle baskets. This specific model is made by the "Rixen & Kaul" and can be found in many online shops. E.g. Amazon - Rixen & Kaul Light-Clip Basket Fitting - Black.


7

What the code is saying is that your headlight has to be visible on the sides. That's why most modern bicycle headlights have those little clear plastic channels on the side for the light to seep through and be seen from the side. ( The idea isn't to blind people GordonM ) Maybe it really reaches 300 feet, maybe it doesn't, the traffic police probably aren'...


7

I wasn't aware of a rule for this, but I would hang a single pannier on left because it's the non-drive side of the bike. I doubt it matters though. When I was buying a new rear wheel a few months back, I found the spoke patterns in some rear wheels are different on one side to the other, so I don't know if this would make a difference. (I'd have added ...


7

Some local recumbent users have a different style flag on their bikes rather than the rectangle or the pennant. I couldn't find a photo online, but the flag is about a 1~1.5 meters tall, and the poll runs up the whole length of it. It is then about a half meter wide. There is very little flapping around and nothing loose to blow in faces and get tangled ...


6

Safety can be thought of as a packet of swiss cheese slices. Each slice is an imperfect barrier (crashes progress through the holes) but if you have enough slices you can eventually block all the holes and have a strong system preventing crashes. Visibility and a helmet is the last line of your swiss cheese defence. I absolutely agree with riding ...


6

There are various extension mounts you can buy or build to reposition lights and other handlebar-mount items. I have a purchased unit that can be adjusted maybe 2" higher than the bar, and which can mount on either the bar or the stem. You can also craft something with a short piece of plastic pipe, a few screws and brackets, and some cleverness.


6

I'm primarily a daytime rider; if I'm riding with two panniers I mount the one on the left first because that is the side with my kickstand, and putting weight on the left (kickstand) side of the bike is more stable for me than the right hand side. If I'm riding with a single pannier I generally mount it on the left for most bicycles. It is: more stable ...


5

Lights and reflectors... lots of it. As others have mentioned you can buy tires with reflective strips on them. (Picture taken indoors, with a flash) I am also a firm believer of using multiple head and tail lights. When one fails there are others to fall back to. Also I stagger the time recharging my headlights... meaning I don't charge them at the same ...


5

The obvious places are on the basket, on the fork crown, or on the fork itself, although they may require mounting hardware or a different light altogether. Reading this may get you some ideas. Looking at the Reelight line-up may also spark your imagination. Or you could also go with unconventional solutions like Revolights.


5

What you are looking for is a product that covers your face (to keep it warm) seals along the upper edge to your face (to keep breath from leaking up under your glasses) and uses a design to direct your exhalations away from your face (so your exhaled moist breath doesn't fog your lenses). There are actually several products on the market designed to do ...


4

Most people have their single pannier on the left side for balance reasons because they are using single-leg kick-stands, which usually mount on the non-drive-side. I have a double-leg kickstand so it doesn't matter which side I mount the pannier -- at least for balance reasons. So I mount it on the right (drive) side. The reason I do this is because ...


3

Attach a pipe or pole to the basket and hey presto! Another "handlebar"! Photos from Bike Hacks contributors:


3

A more specific suggestion: use 3M Diamond Tape (see impressive demonstration). It is really bright. Fun trivia: the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute tried to make it a standard for bike helmets, but none of 3Ms competitors could make a material so reflective. The best reflective material is fixed in your bike, so you will never forget it. Use: reflectors ...


3

In short: Lots of steady light, but don't dazzle. Multiple rear lights help a lot, both for redundancy (if the battery dies) and to give other road users an idea of how fast they're approaching. I have 2 steady and 1 flashing, and may add another to my helmet before winter. The benefit of multiple lights is really noticeable when approaching a bike from ...


3

I did a project to add electronic Arduino turn signals, brake lights, speedometer, and odometer to my bike. You can check out my project here: http://jdeboi.com/pimpmybike/


3

Despite editing this down I could make it into a comment (plus:pictures), so here are some ideas: At the very least 1 or more streamer (like wide ribbons) would be less likely to snag than a large flag, as well as being less of a shock if it gets someone in the face. You need height for visibility as you implied - maybe a bamboo cane to a bit over head ...


3

Print t shirts. It's what festivals and bands do, and it's cheap. If you want them to stand out pick an unusual colour, but regardless, print something big on the back and front. If you're already selling ride t shirts, use those but make the helper ones stand out with coloured sleeves, long sleeves, or a different colour. Use lights. Buy a bunch of cheap ...


3

Glasses fogging is constant problem in cold weather... the good news we are in the midst of a trend towards more cold weather riding and products are starting to come to market to reflect that trend.. google fat-biking. With that in mind I think there are a few different ways to attack the fogging problem Lens coatings. There are coatings you can apply ...


2

If you need the jacket for warmth or wind protection, then get an appropriate jacket for the conditions. The reflective properties of the jacket are secondary. I would not purchase a reflective jacket simply for the sake of reflective materials; rather, I would purchase a good quality jacket for the conditions and then supplement my clothing or bicycle with ...


2

This discussion has been mostly about cycling safety at night. Daytime matters too, and in daytime a brightly colored (say yellow) jacket is a huge safety asset compared to normal clothing.


2

I have a pair of these from Sierra Trading Post: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/north-american-trading-soft-deerskin-gloves-reflective-strip-for-men-and-women~p~4617m/ The reflective strip is wide and works as advertised. If you're biking in cold weather (I'm a Sconnie, so "cold" to me is "25F or below"), I recommend glove liners and/or wristbands; these ...


2

I am a utility worker in the us and have finally used my last orange vest and I was presented with a lime green one by my manager. We were outside when he handed it to me I looked at the vest and then at him and then I threw it in the thin patch of growth near by. After a choice word or two he asked me what did I do that for. I responded with were is it ...


2

You have to understand this: the purpose of a safety vest is to set yourself apart from an environment. So logically speaking, you can buy both : one for in autumn, yellow, since most leafs are orange then and if you where to wear the orange vest, you wouldn't set yourself apart from your environment but you would blend in with it. one for in the rest of ...


2

The following study, carried out in 2009, seems to have attempted to answer the same question: Kwan I, Mapstone J. Interventions for increasing pedestrian and cyclist visibility for the prevention of death and injuries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2006, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD003438. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003438.pub2. This looks like a meta ...


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