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41

Wet metal plates on the road have an astonishingly low grip, on par with a sheet of ice. There's very little you can practically change on your bike to improve this - changing to wider tyres at low pressure would help, but the rest of your commute will be like slogging through treacle, and highly unpleasant. What you can do - change your technique. Never ...


15

Those tyres are probably quite old, and rubber perishes over time. They do not appear on the Schwalbe website. They were racing tyres. https://roadcyclinguk.com/news/event-news/schwalbe-stelvio-evolution.html They are lightweight racing tyres, and very different from those on a Boris Bike. I have cycled on tyres between 2"+ and 23mm, and there is an ...


15

I've got a couple of pairs, and have had similar experiences. The best I can do is with my better pair (with a reasonably tight but comfortable ankle strap) underneath my splash - resistant leg warmers. That keeps out a short heavy shower, or light drizzle for a few hours, but persistent rain always gets in (and anyway feet get sweaty in overshoes). Short ...


11

It should be. That's how I navigate on all my rides, wet or otherwise (phone on the bars). I've done this for a few years, but not completely without incident. Some tips: Make sure all port covers are tightly closed; I even grease mine very lightly. Consider how you will charge if necessary (I might otherwise plug in to a battery pack or my dynamo while ...


10

A roof is better than no roof, but not as good as an enclosed space because wind can blow through bring dust and dirt and moisture. Sunlight is also a source of slow continuous damage. For years I kept bikes under a carport that was also sheltered from the sun, and while they still rusted, it was much slower than if they were out in the weather. If safety ...


6

Overshoes over the top of normal bicycling shoes with cleats are not "waterproof". Water gets in through the cleat holes. And, as you've discovered, through the ankle holes. All you can do is minimize the amount of water that gets into your shoes and delay how long it takes before you're soaked. First, if you're going to use shoes with cleats, you ...


5

You’ll be fine assuming you have a recent phone. They’re entirely glued and sealed shut on the inside, and there’s no battery hatch or anything to worry about either. I ride with my iPhone 7 (only IP67!) in the rain, which I’ve had for 4 years now with no issues. Heck, I wash the thing in the sink and it’s still going strong. If you’ve ever had a battery ...


5

The self-adjustment is a valid concern. The way that's implemented is through the drag and elasticity of the piston seals. Holding those seals in the extended position for long periods could lead to gradual elastic deformation of the piston seals (reducing their ability to retract). It could also result in the seals gradually creeping back down the piston ...


4

keep it outside most of the year If by keep it outside most of the year you mean that it will be stored outside but you will ride it and maintain it then outside storage is not as damaging. If by keep it outside most of the year you mean stored, rarely ridden (once a month or less) and not maintained then you will see damage. I've seen many bikes that were ...


3

I'd never trust the ratings - after all if it fails to survive, you're up for a new phone. There's no guarantee it will perform. My phone is a samsung S5 Active, with a similar waterproof "rating" but over time the various seals have taken wear, so its going to leak. I would not expect it to perform at its rating. Just carry your phone inside a ...


3

As other answers have said, water will always get into your shoes. If this is a problem for you, then the best answer is to not care about it! In warm weather, you might simply not wear socks, and your bare feet will sort themselves out. The biggest problem for wet feet is socks holding cold water next to your skin. In the extreme case, sandals with cleats ...


2

Braking technique You seem to have hydraulic brakes and do mention that they tend to lock-up easily. This should not be the case. Hydraulic brakes are known to be more progressive (there are some slight variations due to designs and pads). If you lock up the wheels, it may be because you are braking too hard in the first place. Try to be more gentle in your ...


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