Hot answers tagged

32

Here's what you need! Lightweight and upright --


28

Consider trying a recumbent. They fail on your "light" requirement, with weights well above a diamond-frame. However for a crook back, sitting in a comfy armchair is magical compared to being on a road bike. There will be some acclimation time - don't expect to just get on and ride like normal.... OK you go back to being a complete noob who can't even ...


26

IMHO, it's not the weight that is hurting you the most. While weight makes a difference and a lighter bike would be much better, it's too common in cycling world for people to use weight as a proxy quality and performance. Any twit with scales can measure it. That said, there is no doubt more suitable bike would make longer trips faster, and a better ...


12

I would recommend you wait for one reason Covid. In most parts of the world bikes are in limited supply. Prices even on used bikes are 50% to 75% higher than comparable bikes a year ago. I think you may wind up overpaying and settling. By settling I mean selecting a bike because it is available. Maybe not the best fit, or the correct type(road, gravel, ...


9

Many of the (continental?) European "every-day" bikes have a relatively upright and straight back position (you basically get a continuum there from sportive strongly forward tilted position to upright or even slightly back tilted.) Typical features of such a bike with more upright/straight back position are U (or M) shaped handle bars (the ends are ...


8

Does something already exist? Probably not. Could something be custom-built for you? Definitely. Super-light bikes are generally only in the "hunched over" aggressive positions, because generally only the most aggressive, competitive riders demand and are willing to pay for them. However, there are custom builders all over the place that can build bikes ...


8

How upright are we talking? It’s true that racing oriented road bike frames have geometries for a relatively hunched-over seating position. However, training road bikes or “fitness” bikes (road bikes with straight handlebars) have relaxed seating positions to start with. You can additionally raise the handlebars quite a lot using a stem with steep upwards ...


6

I will add another suggestion to the conversation, by throwing in the Pedersen. It is a very unique and stylished bike, which would definitely fit your requirements : It has a hammock saddle, which would ease up a lot of the road bumps. It offers what is probably the most upright position that I know of (even more than a Dutch bike). It is fast and light (...


6

There are a few possibilities: The culprit is still stuck in the tire. Carefully check for any glass shards, pieces of wire, thorns etc. Something is sticking out of the rim. Check if the rim tape is properly seated and covers the spoke holes completely. You are using insufficient tire pressure and getting pinch flats (”snake bites”). Usually you’ll get two ...


6

You may start breaking spokes in the rear wheel after putting some miles on the bike. That seems to be where the effects of load shows up first. You can plan to mitigate this by budgeting for a new rear wheel. If this is the bike you are talking about it has 28 spoke wheels. You'll want a 32 or even a 36 spoke replacement wheel, hand built. You don't have to ...


6

You can drop 2.2kg easily with upgrades to your current bike that would probably be less expensive than purchasing a new bike. Much of that weight could be dropped where it matters the most and where you will notice it first; the wheels and tires. Find a lighter weight wheelset with tubeless tires and sealant and I would almost guarantee you will drop over ...


5

Countering the excellent answer by @jc alan.... Carbon will not make you fitter or stronger. It will not make you ride smoother, choosing better lines though the corners and over the rock gardens. Carbon (any new bike) is an easy and expensive upgrade that gives a single step improvement and stops. It sounds like you are after more. What you need to ...


5

If you just need lower gears, you can switch to 24t inner ring. 24/42 is roughly the same as 30/51. I've played around a bit with really low gears and that's about the lowest gear that is rideable for me. Lower than than that and you have to spin like crazy just to keep the bike upright, walking tends to be faster at that point. Getting a really light ...


5

Some light carbon road bike frames can be built up with flat bars, or even bought with flat bars. With an appropriate choice of stem you should be able to get a reasonably upright position. But even if you can get down to 10lbs, many of the times you need to lift a bike it's not a clean lift. Instead I'd be looking for ways to ride without ever having to ...


4

One of the most popular bike brands in Finland is called "Jopo" which is a fairly unique style of bikes. It has high up handle-bars which makes the optimal riding position be fairly upright. Not sure how international the sales are.


4

Have you looked at elliptical bicycles? I tested one out a few years ago. They have no seats and are 'ridden' standing up. They may not meet your weight requirement. https://www.elliptigo.ca/


4

The limiting factor when it comes to durability and cargo on a “normal“ bicycle are the wheels. The Ryde Zac 19 rims used on this bike actually list “MAX. SYSTEM WEIGHT (KG): 110” in the specifications. They also don’t recommend it for “HIGH LOAD 130KG” usage. Though that seems to be a rather conservative estimate considering the weight, number of spoke ...


4

Add 5-8kg to your bike*, go for a ride. Take it off, ride again. Expect the difference in buying a lighter bike to be at least as good. *Try to add mass uniformly, so as not to affect balance.


4

It's not cheap, but you can build up a hard tail carbon MTB frame with a fixed carbon fork and flat bars and get a bike that is well under 20lbs. A 1x11 drivetrain with a wide range cassette and appropriate choice of front chain ring will allow you to climb anything. The drawback is lack of gears for over 25mph. You can also put relatively fat slick ...


3

Unless the trails are quite rough, front suspension is probably making you work harder even there. They'd have to be properly technical MTB trails for rear suspension to speed you up. And on the road suspension is always going to hold you back (if you can lock it, it's only a weight penalty). Some slightly relevant tests I've done recently by riding the same ...


3

i always avoid aluminum fasteners wherever possible due to a lot of bad experiences with them disintegrating over time (especially nipples on fancy wheels), but i'm not a weight-weenie, just weight-conscious. i would say if you can afford ti bolts that'd be what i would go for, even though it's overkill and you'd be shaving maybe 1/10th of a gram. of course,...


3

I think the question of "worth" depends largely on what you plan to do after you achieve your 40-mile goal. Is that as far as you ever want to go, and all subsequent rides will be shorter? Or will you set a new goal of going farther, faster, and/or higher? It all depends on how serious you are about riding. 20kg is a really heavy bike, and you will ...


3

Given your medical condition, I would check if the 8 speed model is an internally geared hub. With an internally geared hub, you simply downshift while stopped, without pedaling. This will make starting so much easier on your knees. For example, if you are travelling at 15 km/h, in a fast gear and you suddenly stop, without downshifting, with the 21 gear you ...


2

Cross-country mountain bikes are pretty light, yet much better suited for an upright position than road bikes. Even more if you adjust the saddle and handlebars, perhaps add a long and high-angle stem. Mountain bikes work just fine on the road. Obviously it makes sense to switch to narrower and low-thread tires and perhaps adjust the suspension (if any), ...


2

Lots of good answers here. Generally higher tension is better. Equal tension between spokes is also important. I bought a tensiometer from eBay for $30 and it got my wheel much rounder and truer than my previous attempts. Maybe if you're really experienced, you won't need to consult it often, but it really helped me. I saw on park tools website that you want ...


2

In general, for weight weenie information, questions, and discussion, I'd recommend joining the Weight Weenies forum. The bottle cage bolts don't need to withstand impacts. They just need to hold the cage in place against the force you exert when pulling a bottle out. They don't really bear much of a load. I am not sure what torque specs there are aside ...


2

When I first got onto a mountain bike with shock absorbers, I thought I was in heaven! If I had some kind of spinal injury, shock absorbers would be a must. Given where I ride -- in the dirt where I don't have to worry about getting hit by 2 tons of metal being not controlled by someone texting-- that means that a mountain bike is a must --ever since I built ...


2

One possibility you might consider is the "flat bar road bike". I have a Giant Fastroad which is an example of this class of bike and it's basically a standard road bike with flat handlebars like a hybrid. (From: Giant FastRoad Web Site)


2

The damper and tyres are constantly draining on your energy, and the heavyness kills you uphill. Your bike is just murderous imo. ;) You only need this downhill stuff with big tyres and damped frame to go downhill on rough tracks, fast. I wouldn´t give a damn about my downhill speed, you have many miles on the road to catch up. Plus you can leave your ...


2

I would say it's unlimited (other than by traffic laws).


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