26

Adding threads to any sort of bolt under tension doesn't actually make it much stronger, beyond the first ≈5 threads. Adding more basically just adds dead mass; either way the whole thing will generally fail somewhere close to the first thread. So, filling the bore with threads wouldn't have any benefit. What it would do however is move the expected point of ...


16

For most applications, most of the time, in the global north, if you're trying to save money then just buying a new wheel is the most economical. The main exception that comes up is if you have a premium quality hub that's built to go indefinitely and is worth re-rimming. But, good handbuilt wheels offer the highest level of reliability and longevity, and ...


15

That kind of rim damage indicates over-worn brake surfaces. Whether you should replace the whole wheel is a strictly economical question which is hard to answer in general. Wheel building services and components prices differ in different countries; somewhere it is cheap to rebuild a wheel at a mechanic; somewhere buying a new wheel is cheaper. Given that ...


13

Spoke washers are used at the hub end, between the flared out cap and the hub itself. The intention is to take up extra length between the bend and the end, to help prevent the spoke from breaking. Common use is on hubs with thin flanges (for lightweight or because they're cheap) and on heavier loaded bikes to spread the load. Notice how the lower spoke ...


13

In the days before factory built wheelset, rims where produced without being specifically for front or rear wheels. On most general-use standard bicycles it is still that way. The only difference was the spoke-hole count. But many rear wheel rims today are no longer symmetrical, meaning the right side is different from the left. This is mainly due to the ...


12

A wheel is only as strong as the tension on the spokes. If the wheel was loose for any significant length of time before you noticed it, the spokes will fatigue very quickly, because they are flexing through a range of motion which is not intended. You are a big guy at 95 Kg, so this type of problem is not unusual (as am I). That means that you need to be ...


12

On a skate board type application it is effective On a bicycle it is not effective and impractical to implement On a skate board you want a wide contact patch. On a skate board you absolutely don't want the wheel to tilt. The idea is to keep the width but reduce contact area. The reduced contact patch has lower rolling resistance. Within the virtual ...


12

It's a little bit wrong in that it has zero upside and one potential downside, but that downside is unlikely to ever be relevant. Trailing spokes straighten a little temporarily under drive load, and this causes the spokes to essentially be pushing on each other a little at the cross. On a wheel laced like this (there's no agreed upon term for it but let's ...


12

The bore guides the thread of the spoke to the threading of the nipple allowing easier spoking with less risk of cross-threading. The bore also allows the spoke to be threaded deeper w/o adding more threading to the spoke. Imagine you want to thread the spoke all the way into the nipple. If there wasn't a bore, but the inside thread of the nipple would ...


11

That is poorly built and unacceptable (in my book) as a paid for product. If all of the spokes are protruding some, and several more than others, it means that the wrong length spokes were used. The reasons for this may or may not be the wheelbuilders fault, it's possible that some component of the wheel build had incorrectly listed sizing and the spoke ...


11

Unless it's actually circular then it's going to be a very bumpy ride. If it's a circular wheel that weaves laterally it could work as described, to some extent, but the float advantages of a fat tyre would obviously be lost. Actually making a lightweight bicycle wheel with significant lateral wobble would be difficult, and the optimum number of wobbles ...


10

There's no problem mounting a disc-compatible hub to rim-brake compatible rim. Just make sure they've got the same number of spokes and you're good to go. You're absolutely right about the opposite though, disc brake rims generally do not have a braking surface on them, the rim profile is round there, so it wouldn't work. And if you did try to brake on it, ...


10

A well built wheel should go years without needed truing. If you are truing the wheel every 2 months something is wrong with the build. There's no way to know via the internet, but my guess is that it's one of two things. The rim is bent slightly and requires significantly uneven tension in the spokes to get the rim true. There isn't enough tension in ...


10

I give you the following, that you can read here: Talking to Jason Marsh the mechanic of Greg Minaar 2012 DH World Cup Champion about ENVE DH rims (which are carbon), he said that, ”Once you have built them, you don’t need to do anything, the spokes remain tight and they don’t need truing and we use a lot less through the year as they are ...


10

There is one major cause of this problem and it is putting a 1.8mm aka 15ga spoke in a 2.0mm/14ga nipple. This mismatch will screw together and hold under some tension, but then slip. It is easy to test. Obtain a known 15ga nipple. If it can screw on to your spokes at all, it confirms the problem. The same thing could happen with a 2mm spoke in a 2.3mm ...


9

That depends on how good your ear is. If you can tune a stringed instrument effectively, then tensioning a wheel by ear is very effective. Identical spokes that have the same pitch when plucked should have the same tension within the margin of error for any tensiometer reading. The catch is you need a tensiometer to get the relative tone for the proper kg/f ...


9

When I build/maintain wheels, I specifically make an extra quarter-turn to the nipple and then quarter-turn backward to release the rotational tension. This was recommended by Sheldon Brown Lubing the spoke can help, but if your spokes are rusted, you might as well replace them with the new ones.


9

Whenever I get stuck wheelbuilding, I loosen every spoke one turn, walk away and come back in a few hours or the next day. The worst thing you can do is keep doing something that is not providing the results you expect. It is completely possible to overtighten spokes enough that they stretch significantly under the tension. You can even break them with a ...


9

From the lack of detail in your question I'm going to assume you don't have a tensiometer. If you do, please tell us what tension you're actually using and what the limits for your rim are. edit The "final half turn" is, as Andy points out in the comments, scary. That will give you an extra 100-200N of tension at a time when you should be working in ...


9

Crossed spoke lacing is primarily necessary to transmit torque from the hub to the rim, rather than for increased strength, although I suspect hub flanges have more strength when loaded by a crossed spoke. Given a trailer wheel will carry a lower load than a bicycle wheel this does not matter.


8

A properly aligned TS-2 truing stand will show dish, as well as alignment. You rarely need additional adjustment after using it. However, if the stand is out of alignment, you may need to re-dish the wheel. The easiest and most accurate check for TS-2 alignment is a properly dished wheel. The best way to ensure that the wheel is properly dished, and ...


8

Place a single leading spoke and a single trailing spoke- both on the same side of the hub- to get your placement correct. That way you only have to unthread two spokes if you're off. Once you've got it right, unthread the leading spoke if you're planning on lacing trailing first or vice versa and proceed as normal with lacing.


8

I've heard before that a smaller wheel is actually stronger, and this site states the following. Because a 26-inch wheel has a smaller circumference than a larger 700c wheel, the rim is structurally stronger and resists deformation from impact. Wheels that are 26 inches excelled at handling hard drop-offs and even crashes without losing their true. The ...


8

There are two things I generally do to help eliminate most of the twist. When tightening spokes, get in the habit of slightly overturning and then turning back. (i.e. If I want to tighten a spoke 1/2 turn, I'll do 3/4 and 1/4 back. ) At regular intervals once the wheel is "close", take the wheel out of the stand and place the wheel vertically on a soft ...


8

It is almost impossible to rebuild a wheel (i.e., new hub and new spokes) without removing the tire. Leaving the tire on, would mean leaving the spoke nipples in place. (It is a good idea to replace the spoke nipples when rebuilding a wheel. You will also require new spokes). It is a big hassle threading the spoke into nipples that are stuck in one ...


8

If the shell is aluminum and we're talking about the whole thing and not just the bearing races, the literal answer is flat out no, because aluminum doesn't have a fatigue limit. It will crack eventually. As to the question of can a hub bearing race, real or hypothetical, last literally forever in any kind of use, that's the kind of question everyone likes ...


8

When the spokes break, do they snap at the J bend? Or elsewhere? If the little mushroomed cap is gone at the hub end and there's a spikey "claw" then your spoke tension is low which is stressing then tensionining the spokes on every wheel revolution. I'd start by lightly tapping the wheel spokes with a screwdriver, key, or something light. And then ...


7

As long as you verify the centering you don't need to do separate dishing. You will need the centering gauge: http://www.parktool.com/product/centering-gauge-1554-1 Do read the instructions and get comfortable making the centering adjustment. It's not difficult. Biggest thing to pay attention to is to SLOWLY lower the gauge into place. Happy Riding! (and ...


7

The one thing to be aware of is that disk brakes put more force on the spokes during breaking than rim brakes. Mostly this is not an issue as long as you do not use radial spoking. If you build up the wheel with 3x and anything but super silly light spokes, it should be no problem at all.


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