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39

To taco a wheel means you've bent it so badly its a write-off and cannot be salvaged through truing. This is significantly worse than going out of true, because the rim will be creased or torn, spoke holes will be pulled through on the outside of the taco curve. A damaged rim alone is not a taco, there has to be a folded wheel to earn the title. ...


14

If your question is, "Can an amateur successfully true a wheel on their first try?", the answer is "Yes". A quick search on the internet reveals plenty of videos explaining the process. Some things to consider: Make sure you fully understand the process before you start Don't use excessive force and take your time Use a spoke wrench Make small adjustments ...


11

For reference, I used to work for Velomax Wheels, and Easton Wheels. You may want to back all of the spokes off an equal amount, say 5 or 10 turns. This will give you a little bit of room for adjustment, without having to completely detention the entire wheel. There is a book called "the Bicycle Wheel", by Jobst Brandt, that does a great job of walking ...


9

I'll answer all your questions in order. 1) "Will this tire wobble wear down the bearings faster, or other components?" -Nope, this wobble will do pretty much nothing to the rim. If anything, you will feel the slightest of 'floating' (the only way I can describe it, the bulge ever-so-slightly lifting the bike when you go over it.) 2) "is this amount ...


9

It looks to me that your tire is not properly centered on the rim. Probably neither the rim nor the tire are faulty, but they require more effort to center the tire. The first thing you should check is whether the rim tape is well-centered. One of the main reasons why a tire cannot center on the rim is that the rim tape has creeped up at some points ...


9

Another danger of riding an out-of-true wheel is cornering. When on the straight, the wheel may be "round" while wobbling from side to side. But when leaning into a corner, the bike is no longer vertical, so that out-of-true in the rim is translating to an out-of-round as well. So the wheel of the bike will be rising and falling ( "oscillating" ?) ...


8

The common qualification here is an important one: truing is a skill that benefits from practice and experience (chicken, meet egg). Your wheels are important, and it's important to have somebody who knows what they're doing at least check your work if you're just learning (or if you're disinclined to trust your well-being in dense traffic to wheels you ...


8

If you haven't hit anything and you haven't parked your bike on a busy bike rack (other tires getting accidentally rammed into your spokes), the most likely culprit is a nipple vibrating loose. You can see if this is a likely possibility fairly easily...one, maybe two, of your spokes will be noticeably loose...less tension then the surrounding spokes (...


8

There are two things I generally do to help eliminate most of the twist. When tightening spokes, get in the habit of slightly overturning and then turning back. (i.e. If I want to tighten a spoke 1/2 turn, I'll do 3/4 and 1/4 back. ) At regular intervals once the wheel is "close", take the wheel out of the stand and place the wheel vertically on a soft ...


8

The 2.2 is not for directly measuring dish, a shop will use a proper dish measuring tool(for time and repeatability) and there are techniques for the home gamer that lacks a dish tool that involve flipping the wheel over in the stand and noting the difference. The caliper is for measuring lateral warp or wobble and radial eccentricity(wheel hop) Only one ...


8

Unfortunately there's not many aspects to truing wheels this question doesn't touch. Also unfortunately, figuring out what's going on with a given heavily used wheel with issues and then making it as good as possible are both beyond-the-basics wheel work skills. Yes, it's possible to set yourself up for a bad situation here. The main ways you would do that ...


7

If the wheel is symmetrical the spokes should all have the same tension. If dished (what you've called "skew" the bicycle world calls dished), the side closer to the centre of the hub will have more tension. All the spokes on the same side of the wheel should have the same tension. Since you have derailleur gears the wheel will almost certainly be dished (...


7

Three posibilities: The tire is defective (least likely). The tire is simply not settling onto the rim properly. You managed to twist/pinch the tube while installing. If you twisted/pinched the tube then there will be low spots, where the tire does not seem to inflate fully. If you suspect this, of course, remove and reinstall the tube. If you're ...


7

Check to see where it's rubbing. It will probably be rubbing on the brake pads, or less likely on the chain stays. If it happens once per rotation it means your wheel is probably warped and needs to be straightened. Should be a pretty basic fix if you take it to a bike shop. Straightening a wheel can be done at home with a simple cheap tool, but takes some ...


7

I would skip using the truing stand and just true the wheel on the trailer. You can generally clamp a strip of something to the frame to act as an indicator (have it stick out and just brush the rim, kind of like a rim brake pad), so you can more easily zero in on the worst spots. Dishing/centering is harder without a stand, but there should no need to ...


6

The biggest functional reason actually would be chain line. You could make the hub shell wider, and run an offset dropout to allow the space for the gears, but then you would have to run a similar offset on the bottom bracket to maintain a usable chain line. Running the offset on the bottom bracket would affect Q factor positioning on many riders, and ...


6

If its just one spoke, and you are after functional, not perfection, all you would need it a spoke wrench. If its the right hand side of the rear wheel, you will need to remove the cluster so need tools for that. Tourers often/usually carry spare spokes and can replace them on the side of the road if needed, so you don't need all the gear the LBS has (...


6

A spoke wrench is required, the stand and tension meter are optional but can make your job easier. You can use the frame of your bike and the brakes if you have rim brakes as your truing stand. If you have disc brakes you can use wire/zip ties wrapped around your frame tubes and poking toward the rim then trimmed to measure true (assuming the wheel is ...


6

Roger Musson's book "Professional Guide to Wheel Building" simply states that: "The best place to start when judging the correct tension is to examine a similar wheel you know to be good and reliable and compare the spoke tension to the one being built." Musson does not use the sound of the spokes to determine their tension, only to find differences in ...


6

For a normal wheel with 32 or more spokes and a metal rim, I'd say you are pretty safe. Even if one or two spokes ended up breaking, there is enough redundancy to avoid catastrophic failure. Myself I'd probably continue riding even if one spoke broke. However, if you have one of those super-light 16 spoke wheels or a carbon fiber rim, be more careful as ...


5

On a standard front wheel all spokes (both left and right) should (in theory) make the same musical note when plucked. A rear wheel is 'dished' to make room for the cassette. The non-drive side spokes will be at a lower tension (and pitch) than the cassette side. If you can find a bike with the same spokes and lacing pattern use that as a guide. If not, any ...


5

If the adjacent spokes with different tension are on the same side of the wheel, then you could, to a certain amount, release the tension from the tight one and tighten the loose one. If they are each on one side of the wheel, you could not even the tesion without untruing the wheel, and that means your rim is not intrinsically true. If the rim is not ...


5

The answer depends on the reason for the "hop" and your desire for perfection. A wheel which is out of round due to incorrect spoke tension, rather than impact damage to the rim, will have no trouble being repaired, even with far greater than 3-4mm of deviation by detensioning all the spokes, and re-tensioning them evenly, essentially re-building the wheel....


5

This blog post (google cache, original gone) on the Park site suggests a range of 20%, this thread has people saying a range of 1 on the TM-1 is fine (edited in some quotes): I sort of try to finish within a 0.1 mm error radially/laterally and under 0.5 notch (of the tension meter) of standard deviation for all spokes. I get DS tension under 1 notch ...


5

This subject can be confusing to learn about because people use terminology to mean different things, and some of the physical techniques involved are working to help achieve a couple different goals simultaneously. When truing wheels, and especially when doing extensive wheel truing or building a wheel, you must be concerned with managing spoke windup, and ...


4

You rim should be centered over your hub. If you are using the tool correctly, and the rim is not centered, it should be redished. If you are not confident in your abilities and knowledge on the subject, get a second opinion from your LBS mechanic before you make changes to the wheel. Sometimes, those kind of changes are difficult to reverse.


4

It's (a lot) harder to achieve in-out motion than side-to-side, and generally requires (much) more that 1/2 turn adjustments. Plus you must usually loosen spokes on either side (2-4 spokes away) of a high spot, or tighten spoken on either side of a low spot. For low spots sometimes you need to tighten ALL the spokes except those over the spot. But at some ...


4

As has been mentioned in the comments, you should take it to a shop. You're likely to do more harm than good if you're not already experienced in at least truing and preferably building wheels. It also might not even take a couple hundred miles. I'd probably check on it once a week or even every couple days. Feel the spokes. Once it gets to a point where ...


4

Yes you could try truing yourself, but also yes you could "destroy the whole thing"! Well, not destroy it, but end up with a wheel more out of true and maybe some damaged spokes. Out of any repair on a bike this one is one you need to get your head round first and take your time on. Don't let that put you off, just take it slowly and carefully and it should ...


4

The Park centering tool is just a symmetric piece of metal that fits into the truing stand. If you have a true wheel you can use that just as well. If you are concerned about the dish of the wheel, flip the wheel to make sure it doesn't matter which way you put it into the stand. The centering can be adjusted with the caliper arm lock nuts (according to ...


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