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18

The parts of this topic that usually get glossed over in written sources and hearsay are: Not all wheel production machinery and processes are the same. It's kind of the opposite, actually. It's a spectrum. And, in at least Holland Mechanics' case, the lines have modular components. For example, before the truing robot there can be another machine that ...


15

It may be worth glancing at this more detailed answer that discussed how aluminum rims were constructed. But in brief, aluminum rims are first extruded in a flat bar, then they’re cut and rolled into hoops, then the ends of each hoop are joined. One method is to simply pin the ends together, and you’re looking at the seam where the ends were joined. ...


7

Wheelbuilding is a combination of art and science. A machine-built wheel has no art - by that it lacks the "touch" of a skilled person building the wheel. The machine that builds wheels is a technological marvel of moving parts and order, and is a massive time saver. This also brings wheels down in price. By comparison, a hand-build wheel by an ...


5

I suspect the rim will be just fine based on your description. A cone is presumably an orange plastic road cone, which are fairly soft and squishy. You as the rider had a hard fall, but the bike's wheel rim was already on the ground, and probably did not take much of an impact. As long as the brake track is still flat, your rim is fine to ride. If your tyre ...


3

There are several ways in which a hand built wheel is superior: Stress relieving. You must grasp the spokes hard to stress relieve. A machine may not easily be able to do this. Lubrication on nipple-to-rim and nipple-to-spoke interfaces. A machine that installs the components may not install sufficient lubrication, making it impossible to fully tighten the ...


3

I have selected two cutaway section drawings of different rims from the same manufacturer for this example. They are a similar sort of width and profile but have significant differences. Regarding tyre fitting, to seat or unseat a tyre, the bead has to be able to go into the rim's well in order to pass over the rim wall, otherwise it would be impossible (the ...


3

Notice how in the video he removes all the spokes with an angle grinder and we never see them again. then he chops up the rim into four pieces, which has the effect of making it come apart a bit. On that basis, it would seem, to this non-fisher, that the spoke count and length is entirely immaterial. You say it is a 26 inch rim, it looks like it might be ...


2

This is a seam from where the rim was manufactured. You are safe. There is no possible way a crack would be perfectly straight. Check other rims ( even new ones ) and you will see this seam.


2

Specs you need to match: Wheel size: 27.5" Rim width: 30-35mm Disc mount: 6-Bolt Axle standard: 12/148mm Boost Freehub: Shimano (HG) (not Microspline!) Many shops let you filter the wheels after some of these criteria. For example (missing the rim width): Bike24


2

Visual is the right way. You do it by finding confluence between the tire appearing perfectly behind the seat tube, the gap between the chainstays and the tire being equal, and the gap between the seatstays and the tire being equal. Every once in a while you see a bike where those things can't all be true at once even with a correctly dished wheel, and that ...


2

These are not standard parts so you won't find anything that's "compatible" with it. You'd need a replacement. Did you try writing to Decathlon or bringing it to one of their shops? B'twin is their brand, they have repair shops, so they could have a replacement. Other than that you could just make it. Find a tube with a proper inner diametre and ...


1

not sure what you mean by "hub end cap". there is a piece that covers the non-drive side, but on the freehub side you posted, the entire hub is covered by the cassette and lock ring. replacing the QR skewer should be sufficient. i'm assuming the picture you're posting is a stock photo, if you post a picture of your wheel, we may be able to ...


1

In this case, you have a solid axle presumably with flanged nuts on the outside of the dropouts. You're good as long as there's: 100% thread engagement on both nuts when everything is tightened No frame or brake rub This means that the visible stick-out of thread on each side must be longer than the sum of the dropout thickness plus the nut's thickness. ...


1

Let's get our part names clear From Sheldon Brown The nut in the posted question pointed at with the red arrow is the locknut on the freewheel/cassette side. The side of the axle with the large spacer - the left side in the picture above is the freewheel/cassette side. First remove the freewheel/cassette. Second Tighten the locknut against the cone by: ...


1

Some rim/tyre combinations are tighter than others. The difference in circumference can go from tight to easy within millimetres. Your new rim seems to be slightly larger than the original, while still being 559mm in total diameter. One solution is to check the valley in the rim, and when fitting/removing tyre make sure that the bead sits down in the valley....


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