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21

The 'noodle' (the curved silver tube the brake cable passes through) has slipped through the holder on the right-hand (in your picture) brake caliper. The noodle is designed to come out of the holder to spread the calipers to enable the wheel to be taken out. The proper configuration looks like this: Squeeze the calipers together and free the noodle from ...


21

The return spring on the right hand caliper (from the point of view of sitting on the bike) has come out of its stop in the caliper. The spring in the left hand caliper is pulling both calipers to the left. You can see the return spring sticking horizontally out of the right hand caliper. It looks like about 10cm of stiff wire. The spring wire should be on ...


15

In order to fit a disc brake, you need a compatible fork and a compatible wheel, plus a compatible brake lever. Your fork does have a disc brake mounting already designed in, it is an International Standard (I.S.) mount. Most mtb brakes now are Post Mount fittings so are fitted using a simple adapter. You can see the differences here or search around images....


12

Hope hubs are a very refined, reliable execution of the pawl design. They don't do much to illustrate the disadvantages of the concept that designs like the star ratchet are trying to address. One potential downfall of pawl systems like Hope uses is that when things go wrong with them, either the pawls or the part inside the hub shell that the pawls engage, ...


10

Searching for "ndm rotational speed" finds that D and d are outer and inner diameters of the bearing. n is not the usual symbol for speed, but neither is the final unit "millimeters per minute divided by pi" an usual unit. And here we go: A slightly optimistic approximation for road bike speed would be 10 m/s (36 km/h, 22.5 mph) and wheel circumference 2 m....


8

A further thing to watch out for when following Argenti's (correct) advice: Check the end of the noodle holder very carefully. I've seen some old, cheap V brakes in which this was too soft and opened up allowing the noodle to slip through in a similar way to the photos in the question, when you squeeze the brakes very hard. Here's a sketch of the end of ...


6

Both work fine. Technical explanation would lead to endless debate between people who don't know what they are talking about, so I'll go for economical one instead. The patent for DT style star ratchet expired in 2015 and Chris King ring drive in 2017. Unlike innovations such as cassette freehubs, threadless headsets or three piece cranksets, other ...


6

The bearing cup is toast from being ridden with a bent axle. The hub shell does not appear to have structural cracks. With a new axle you could potentially get some life out of it, but you're probably on the right track with replacement, especially if this is a bike you're riding indefinitely. With either the freewheel or cassette route, the sort of wheel ...


5

The rim size is immaterial to the strength of the set you choose. Many rim brake 650b rims out there would not make good tandem rims, but there are exceptions. The VO Voyager or Diagonale in 36h are the main ones I can think of. Sun CR-18s are another, cheaper possibility. Also Velocity Cliffhanger or Atlas. 650b is likely the right choice for a ...


5

You can put 12 speed on any of the freehub body types found on mountain bikes (HG, XD, or Micro Spline), but if you want to use a 10t small cog you can't use HG. The spacing from the rotor mount surface to the dropout is standard, but the tolerance is big enough to make this the spot where alternate wheelsets can be tricky to make work with no adjustment. ...


5

The answer is yes, but it might not be cost effective for your situation. I will answer this question from the perspective of someone who already owns a 650c frame but wants to purchase a new wheel-set. The BSD of a modern 26" mountain bike wheel is 559mm, which is only slightly less than a 650c at 571mm. Sheldon Brown provides a big table. If your brakes ...


4

By 'hop' I assume you mean radial run-out (as opposed to lateral run-out). A bent axle will have no effect on the rim running radially true or not, because the hub rotates around the static axle. A slightly bent quick release shaft will just conform to the bore through the axle and have no effect. A rim can be perfectly circular but still have radial run-...


4

You're unlikely to get hubs that convert from QR to thru-axle as part of a complete factory bike, though a good number of after market hubs are available which can be swapped between the different standards using end caps. I say unlikely but it's not impossible, the best thing would be to contact Scott directly or your local dealer with the enquiry. The ...


3

Small considerations 1) which one will have spare parts available in the future, should you need them? That's very hard to guess at this point. You might need to buy a new freehub to support a different sized cassette someday. 2) sound - some riders are all about the sound of their freehub as it coasts. It makes no difference to me cos I generally soft-...


3

could it simply be that the new rim is a few millimeters wider and the brakes are making contact because of that? If the wheel is seated into the dropout all the way, the quick release will have enough force to fully clamp the frame to the hub securely. Check by unclamping the qr, putting some body weight on the saddle with a shoulder and reclamp the qr. ...


3

My son had an toe-overlap issue, and it turned out the forks were on backwards. I looked up how to take the forks out, and after I turned them around, the bike is perfect. No toe-overlap! Thanks for the suggestion.


3

It sounds like the wheel in question has an 11s freehub splined for Shimano cassettes. The technical name is a hyperglide (HG) freehub (not relevant to you, but 10s versions of this exist also; the 11s versions will take 9s or 10s cassettes, however). Shimano and SRAM 12s cassettes won't fit to 11s HG freehubs. I think the freehub technically is long enough,...


2

The first thing to check is if your wheel is slightly misaligned in the dropouts. Disk brake tolerances are pretty small. From the web it looks like the front wheel has a quick release. Try untightening the wheel and reseating it in the dropouts. If that doesn't fix the grinding noise, you should check if the pads have adjusted too far in or the brake rotor ...


2

If it where a tiny crack and your trainer was the type that holds the weight by the skewer then maybe, but the damage shown may be too risky even to mount and inflate the tire onto it. I think the outward pressure from the tire might further break the rim walls and expand them, causing contact with the bike. If that happens while your'e spinning the tire it ...


1

I would consider ease of maintenance a factor in your decision regardless of ratchet style. Obviously from the vast supply of information above, you get the idea that it is primarily a matter of taste and budget that will inform your final choice, as both styles have their strong points and weaknesses, but consider that I have to do routine cleanings of my ...


1

For completeness - this is a part custom to your brand and model of frame. It doesn't seem to be related to your choice of wheel skewer. So your best option is to contact the manufacturer of your frame directly, or their authorised agents in your area. Based on the linked question, you have a Canyon Commuter, and their contact information for you is based ...


1

That looks like a pinned rim joint where the pin on that side of the rim is trying to break free. What exact model wheel is that? (There are three basic ways the rim material is joined into a hoop - welded, pinned, and sleeved. Welded means the two ends are welded together then machined, pinned means two metal pins - one in each rim wall - are used to ...


1

That's the seam of the rim. It's fine.


1

It sounds from the audio like the tyre is rubbing somewhere. The sound is certainly related to the wheel because the frequency speeds up and slows down with bike speed, not pedalling. You say the tyre isn't rubbing, but the sound doesn't happen when bike is unloaded, so perhaps when it is fully loaded, the frame is flexing enough to cause a rub - is there ...


1

Those brakes are far out of alignment. The brake arms should be symmetric around the bike's centerline. You may need to let some slack into the cable, at least temporarily by loosening the cable-fixing bolt and letting 1-2 cm more slack in. You'll see small screws pointing outward near the pivots. These pre-load the springs for each brake arm. Tighten the ...


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