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Hot answers tagged

50

Rims are worn out when the groove disappears. If the groove is clearly visible, well-defined and of uniform depth all the way around, the rim is not quite worn out and certainly not dangerous. New brake blocks will cause less wear as they will be free of hard particles of grit and metal that get embedded in the relatively soft rubber over time. Given the ...


4

You're definitely safe to ride these assuming the wear is uniform the whole way round and you're not just showing us the good bit! My local shop will recommend things be replaced in front of your significant other if you want an upgrade. Are you sure you didn't inadvertently give a secret code that you want to buy some carbon rims?


4

I had an experience with worn rims. The wheel suddenly exploded, the tire separated from the rim, and I ended up cycling on the (metal) rim alone. Since I was on a straight, even road, it was not too alarming. As I remember it, I removed the tyre and continued to cycle home on the bare metal rim. Consequences could had been worse, had it taken me by ...


4

There is no hard and fast rule that matches spoke crossing to spoke count. It's more of a continuum. More spokes and more crossing = More durable wheel. Less spokes and less crossing = lighter wheel (possibly more aero as well). So you can build up a 32h 2x wheel and get wheel that is not quite as durable as a 3x wheel. You don't see this in production, ...


3

You say you want to replace the rim, but unless the hub is something special, or you're going to rebuild the wheel yourself, it's probably cheaper to replace the whole wheel. If you're replacing the rim, apart from approximately matching the rim width (see Sheldon Brown) you also need to match the number of spoke holes if you want to reuse your hub, and it'...


3

Great idea - smaller 650B wheels with winter tyres will be easier to swap than swapping tyres on your only set of wheels. As long as your fenders / mudguards are wide enough to cover your wider tyre, and large enough to not touch your larger tyre, then they'll work fine for the smaller and narrower tyre. Note that we consider specific brand recommendations ...


3

In my experience the answer is kinda yes. You won't need to re-align the calipers with every wheel change, but you will likely need to adjust the brake pads. Hydraulic brakes make the process easier since they are self-adjusting. On bikes with mechanical disk brakes you will likely need to adjust the pads with every wheel change. In theory, every 6 bolt ...


2

I can swap the wheels between my tourer and hardtail with no need to even adjust the mechanical disc brakes (or the gears - both are Shimano 9 speed). In the past I also had a second front wheel for the tourer. All 4 hubs are 6-bolt, from at least 3 makes: rear Shimano and (I think) Joytech, front SP (dynamo) and (I think) Shimano.


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Yes, you can use 120mm hub. In my opinion the frame is well within tolerance for 70s steel bike. If the difference bothers you, you can add an 1mm spacer to each side between cone and locknut.


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You've over-tightened the hub, the most likely explanation. Hub tightening needs a lot of forth and back between too little and too much. And putting the hub into the fork and tightening the axle nuts may also become that little too much. Remove the wheel, undo the locking nut and the cone by 1/8 of a turn. Hold the cone with your cone-wrench and relock ...


1

First check that all the spokes from the front wheel have the proper tension. As the disc brake is on the left side of the wheel, the force applied on it when braking deforms it and tilt it a little bit. Is a common effect but shouldn't be so important or dangerous. However if the spokes have not the adequate tension, it could be increase this feeling. Check ...


1

It is a normal effect with disc brakes, the major reason why most motorbikes have left and right discs at the front. Braking on the left side only will cause a slight deformation of the left leg of the fork, pushing it backwards. The wheel follows. I'd guess you have quick releases on your bike. If you do, try to tighten it a bit more. Through axles have ...


1

If you want to directly replace the rim you need to match the rim diameter, width and number of spokes. The rim diameter is ISO/ERTRO 622 i.e. 622 mm, commonly know as 700c. Rim width you can easily measure if you have the bent rim (or the other wheel, assuming it's matched). It's the inner width between the tire bead hooks. You don't need a replacement ...


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Inner tubes have stretchy thin walls. Tyres in contrast are several times thicker and the threads of the tyre carcass prevent stretching. The thin walls will lead to different aspect ratios of punctures in tyres and tubes. A long narrow hole will much more easily get clogged by a sealant than a short wide hole. In the latter case the sealant may remain not ...


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