Hot answers tagged

17

These are wear indicators. After years of braking, the surface of the rim will grind down to a point that these grooves will no longer be discernable. At that point, you should replace the rim.


9

It is possible that when you put in your wheel into the drops you are not seating it all the way before tightening the QR. This can lead to the wheel being slightly off angle that would lead to rubbing. The fix for this is some people will install wheels when the bike is on the ground to prevent this or alternatively you need to apply pressure into the drops ...


6

I know this is an old thread but there's isn't much out there in terms of a solution for calculating spoke lengths for "quad" rims. I have a pair of hoops that are 4x8 (32h). The space between the quartets is exactly the distance that four additional holes would occupy, so it's essentially a "64h" rim in which we're skipping every other ...


4

There's no such thing as a "normal" wheel. There are different rim widths for different purposes. These are probably older mountain-bike wheels. Regarding tire compatibility: a given rim width will be compatible with a range of tire widths. Different manufacturers may have slightly different recommended ranges, but this and this are good starting ...


4

I've seen this, it's real. The physics of what actually happens to the axle under QR compression are a little mysterious, to me at least. Standard axles get slightly bowed, and that could end up having some effect on the alignment of the hub shell. One could also contrive a situation where dropout misalignment allows variance in QR force to cause this effect,...


4

If I measured the rim to be an actual ERD of 564 (the published number) with the nipples I was using, this is what my calculation would look like using the raw formula via Spocalc: From there I would choose 271 for my right length or 270 if that wasn't available, and 272 for my left or 271 if that wasn't available. The rouding down by those amounts is to ...


3

To answer this question, you need some measurements. The rim ERD, from the Ryde website. The centre-to flange (left and right) measurements of the hub and the spoke hole circle diameter. These you may need to measure yourself as they are not always published. This information is then entered into software (or a website) that performs the spoke length ...


2

Good job on your first build! It does really just sound like you have low spoke tension. Usually, i tighten the spokes until no threads are visible on any spokes as a starting point. If your spokes are too short (not threaded into the nipple all the way into the rim) the nipples will prematurely break, especially on a mtb. Inflating the tire will squeeze the ...


2

The Velo Orange rear hub comes in 32 or 36 with the correct endcaps for 135 QR. You choose the freehub you want, 11speed road is an option. https://velo-orange.com/collections/hubs/products/disc-rear-hub-silver-and-noir?variant=31841972715657 Halo make an equivalent part (WL) but only a 28 drilling. A DT Swiss hub with the correct endcaps would work, as ...


2

From https://easymountainbiking.com/can-you-fit-an-11-or-12-speed-cassette-on-10-speed-hub-on-a-mountain-bike/ "Standard Shimano freehubs are 33-34mm. Now, you may have some older mtb 11-speed cassette that needs a bigger freehub or you simply want to fit a road cassette on it. Believe it or not, gravel bikes are usually best with wider mtb hubs and ...


1

You can add a 5mm spacer to the NDS of any non-disc 130mm QR road hub and dish for 135mm. I've done this a few times with 11s 105 and ultegra hubs. But then you'll have to give up the rear disc brake. is there a center mount for dual pivot rim brakes in the rear? There are clamp-on (😬) brake bosses to add posts for cantilever brakes but... As far as ...


1

Having them custom built for around $200 is possible if you reuse your rims and you use inexpensive hubs. Spokes will run about $60 for 100 DT Swiss champion 14g silver. I wouldn't re-use your old spokes anyway given that they're, well, old. Making the wheels yourself can get a bit involved in terms of know-how and tool$. If you're on a budget, look for ...


1

Yes you can if the rims themselves are both symmetric. And, give it a try. Don't listen to the nay-sayers. Some people are so risk averse, I'm surprised they leave their houses in the morning. What's the worst that could happen? This isn't amputating your leg. It's just a wheel. Bust a spoke? $2/each. Have to buy a spoke wrench? $10 used. Over tighten/...


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