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3

A road 11 speed compatible wheelset will have a freehub body that is 36.75mm wide. A 8/9/10 speed compatible wheelset will have a freehub body that is 34.95mm wide - 1.8mm narrower. You can fit 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes on an 11 speed freehub body with the addition of a 1.8mm spacer.


2

You are correct about the cassette compatibility. If you are already shopping online, the easiest way is to do a web search for Shimano cassette spacer and pick one that adapts 8-10 speeds to 11-speed road freehub. It is possible that the wheelset already comes with such a spacer, so it is probably best to ask the seller first.


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For less than $10 you could convert the axle to quick release. It is no more difficult than doing routine service. Purchase a replacement axle of the correct length and swap it out.


3

The only potential caveat is many solid axle hubs come with toothed axle nuts that are good at chewing up dropout surfaces, particularly aluminum or carbon. On "nice" bikes it's always best to just use track nuts if possible to preserve the frame while still getting good clamping force, or washers at the least.


2

As someone who routinely rides that sort of distance, I'd say the biggest worry about punctures is knowing how to fix them, and being equipped (a couple of tubes, patch kit, pump, tyre levers). They're rare even on the poorly maintained back roads I often find myself on, and can happen whatever tyres you ride. Over the last two years, in 26 rides of over ...


1

Without seeing the exact tires that are on the bike, we need to speculate. Mattnz discusses how the width across the tire affects the chances of puncturing. Another factor is the thickness of the tire carcass, which might be what the shopkeeper meant. A thin-wall tire will obviously be more prone to punctures than a thick-wall tire, at any given tire width. ...


3

Excluding tires so old and worn they obviously need replacement, there are two main root causes of punctures in well maintained bicycles. Low Pressure causing 'snake bite' punctures. When the pressure is too low, and you hit a bump, the tire can pinch the tube against the rim and cause a puncture. Small tires have to run at higher pressure to stop this ...


3

Thanks, guys, like you say "it depends". But those pointers allowed we to find the answer for my own case which is: "Yes, if I get 3/8 inch BMX axles and bend (cold set) the rear frame or add spacers." Axle Diameter Cheap store-bought bikes like mine have 3/8" or sometimes 10mm axles, which are practically the same. BMX ones are either 3/8", or are 14mm, ...


2

You are correct that different bikes have different spacings between the dropouts (and hence different how widths and axle lengths). Measure the inner distance between the front and rear dropouts and compare with the specs of wheels you want to get. Beware that sometimes frames and forks spring in or out a bit when the wheel is taken out.


4

The bead on a tire is a raised tubular section that goes around the inside edge of the tire on both sides. The diagram you have attached has no bead. It is a cutaway diagram of a rim/wheel, which does have bead seats (where the tire beads "lock into" the rim). The diagram is a bit confusing because it cuts out the center of the wheel (spokes and hub) to ...


1

I think it very much depends on the bicycle, your own body and the terrain/usage. If you ride on flat terrain at a continuous, high speed then aerodynamic wheels will help you the most. Especially if the rest of your bicycle (+riding position) is already optimized. More gears will only help you if they have smaller gear steps so you can pick the perfect ...


0

The wheels will make a bigger difference to performance. The groupset will work fine if adjusted carefully.


1

A commuter bike should be as cheap and durable as possible. Carbon rims will not provide any advantage for a commuting ride. Carbon rims are really only useful for racing but the marketing machines have convinced us of their necessity and superior "feel". Unlike aluminum, one cannot be certain of the quality of an off-brand, discount carbon wheelset. You ...


3

You should evaluate your objectives. What advantage do you feel a new wheel-set or groupset would provide? If your objective is to ride faster, then I would suggest you invest the time in building your aerobic base and physical strength with interval training and some resistive weight training. If your objective is to look cool then do what you wish but ...


6

The bead is the wire at the inner edge of the tire, which creates a bulge in the edge that locks into the groove in the rim. The word "bead" here is more akin to the woodworking term bead than to the "small ornaments on a string" sense.


1

How do the wheels attach? The instructions never illustrate how the wheels attach to the frame so all we can do is guess. Looking at the picture (the vehicle is facing left) The wheel bolts to the steering rack - attaching something like a wheelchair wheel. The there is a black verticle rod with a black ball on top on each side used to pivot the rack and ...


3

Yes those are the tyre diameter and width in inches. M12 is a kind of metric thread, 12mm in diameter and 8.8 is a strength rating. I guess the axle is a piece of M12 threaded rod.


8

Its a rear wheel security axle nut, with an anti-rotation washer underneath. I see a band brake or a roller brake, and a Shimano Nexus (8?) internally geared hub, which are reasonably valuable, hence the security nut. If you want to get it off with a minimum of damage, I'd make a tool. Get an old set of bootpinch pliers and round off the cutting faces ...


10

A security nut is exactly what it is. I've seen similar ones on public bike share bikes. As to where you get the tool for it, no idea. Other ones I've seen have been shrouded; this looks like you could get a pipe wrench on it to replace it with a normal one.


0

I bought a hand built wheel set with custom parts for EUR 400 last year. Retail cost of all parts would have been EUR 533. Especially spokes are cheaper in bulk and business-to-business. 48 Sapim spokes and DT nipples and washers alone are close to EUR 150 in retail now. The labour cost of a wheel builder can be small compared to the increased retail ...


4

Let's clarify some terms. A "rim" is the hoop at the perimeter of the wheel, which you mount the tires on. It sounds like you're talking about replacing the entire wheel. It is possible to cut off the old rim and rebuild the wheel with new spokes and rim, although probably more expensive than just buying a stock wheel. A "cassette" is a cluster of gears ...


5

What you have there is a freewheel, not a cassette. The difference is a freewheel combines the freewheel ratchet mechanism and sprockets and mounts on a large diameter thread on the hub; the freehub/cassette system puts the freewheel ratchet mechanism in the hub and the sprockets slide on a splined freehub body. See here for in depth explaination. You ...


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