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3

Here's an annotated rotated version of your photo: To get the wheel in: Pull the RUBBER BOOT to the right, slide it along the INNER CABLE toward the PINCH BOLT Squeeze the BRAKE ARMS together at the top. This allows the NOODLE to move to the left, permitting the YOKE to swing away from the NOODLE. When the bike is upside down like yours, it may need a ...


4

Most V brakes can be disengaged by the process the manual says. Anther term for this part is the cable-hook link or the cradle and the noodle. Some most-basic V-brakes do not have this feature and may require releasing the cable-fixing bolt. The process is shown in this video Then you will have to properly setup the ...


1

There are two ways to assemble a new bike. The right way The way it's usually done To answer your question: The front brakes need to be widened to fit the wheel, it says to 'disengage the cable guide tube from it's yoke'. Not sure where or how and I don't want to force anything and break it. It looks like you are concerned with getting the front ...


0

As all of the comments and the answer above address the potential causes of your issue, I'll offer my 2 cents for potential solutions, mostly of the MacGyver variety. But first: to easily diagnose whether the problem is with the fork or with the rotor/hub/wheel, try to borrow another 26" (I'm guessing) quick-release disc front wheel from a friend. Have ...


2

A few things can cause this: In theory it could be a problem with the alignment of the mounting posts on the fork. This isn't likely for a few reasons. One is that the problem would have been pretty egregious if the bike was doing it from day one, i.e. the wheel wouldn't have turned and someone would have noticed. Another is that suspension forks rarely ...


7

Leave the wheel in tact and see if you can order some 'turbo trainer axle nuts', pictured below, to replace your current nuts on existing axle. If these don't work for you then start disassembling the wheel but research first; you need skinny spanners called cone spanners (£?) to do the job properly and risk dropping ball bearings (annoying). Not normally a ...


1

I have a similar Saris trainer. I tried fitting a solid axle wheel onto it. In my setup the wheel did not securely fit in the clamp. The only thing I think would work is if you could find some domed caps nuts to go the end of the axle. Finding these may be difficult as axle threads are not always a standard thread. Their website did not offer and adapters or ...


2

This is not an easy swap. It would be easier to buy a wheel and freewheel and swap the tire. As Swifty points out in comments - it's a great convenience to have a turbo tire and wheel to swap in when training. I looked up your trainer and read the manual. I had hoped that they could somehow accommodate a solid axle - Nope. It says that you have to use the ...


2

As you have observed your bike has a threaded, solid axle. The wheel is fixed in the frame with a nut on each end of the axle. The Fluid 2 trainer is designed for wheels with a standard quick release mechanism. Quick release hubs have an axle that does not protrude past the frame dropouts and has a concentric hole through which the quick release skewer ...


6

You can do it with files. The chrome does make the surface harder but it's not a big deal. This is usually seen when the fork was originally slotted to take a 5/16" axle. I'm not a Raleigh historian but I'd be a little surprised were that the case on a Grand Prix. It's also possible that it's a fork that fits a 9mm front axle very tightly, and you're trying ...


4

If the fork is hard to grind, or you value it more and don't want to damage it, maybe you can grind the threads of the axle a little bit, where it meets the dropouts. I've never done this, though. Not sure if entirely safe. But what I've done quite recently was to swap the QR axle for a non-QR one with nuts, on a commuter bike, for anti-theft purposes. It ...


3

I had a 1981 Raleigh Arena with a more modern 1990's shimano wheelset. The axle did not fit through the fork's dropouts, but there was enough space at the top of the dropouts. Given it was a steel fork, I was able to pull one fork leg/tine out and over the axle, at a time. On the plus side, that wheel could not fall out even if I lost the whole QR.


5

A consideration is the diameter of the wheel, compared to the hub diameter. The smaller the wheel, the more difficult it is to "cross" the spokes.


2

Radial is cheaper, simpler, and perhaps lighter. I think that hub flanges are stronger when spokes are laced with some cross. I also think the spokes stay tight better, and it looks better, so my preference is to lace with some cross even in case of front rim brake wheels or trailer wheels. But the default answer is it doesn't really matter for those types ...


9

Crossed spoke lacing is primarily necessary to transmit torque from the hub to the rim, rather than for increased strength, although I suspect hub flanges have more strength when loaded by a crossed spoke. Given a trailer wheel will carry a lower load than a bicycle wheel this does not matter.


1

Sometimes this is your friend:


4

You need a 3/8"x26tpi (threads per inch) axle nut. For decades they've all had 15mm wrench flats. (I believe that is something where you can find other examples in very old American, British, and probably other inch country bikes, but that is here nor there.) Bike shops have them. 3/8x24 is usually only for internally geared and coaster brake axles. ...


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