25

I have not had much luck with any of the preset settings (on my cateye computers) always using custom. Here is how I recommend to measure the circumference: Inflate your tire to desired psi Put a mark of chalk on the garage floor and bike tire Sit on my bike and roll forward one revolution until the bike tire mark comes back to the floor Mark the end ...


12

No you will not be able to use your 700x23c tire on a 650c rim. The bead seat diameter of 700c rims is 622mm, this will also be the bead diameter of the your 700x23c tire. The bead seat diameter of a 650c rim is 571mm (see Velocity's Spec section). Your 700x23c tire will be 51mm too wide.


8

The standard hub width for road wheels with QR is 130mm for non disc and 135mm for disc hubs. Even though you can force the frame to clamp around narrower hub, it is strongly recommended to add spacers to the axle to adjust the width. As mentioned in comments, if you have hydraulic brake it's best to insert a spacer between brake pads so that you do not ...


7

Calliper and disc positions are standard, as are hub widths and fork spacings for disk wheels. Minor adjustments of the calliper's position could be required. There are however several methods for locking the wheels in the fork that will require your attention: traditional quick release or different types of through axles!


7

The Hed wheels may be slightly better in an objective sense, but the absolute difference may be small. Additionally, as a consumer, it may be hard to tell where they're better, and by how much, just from the specs. As outlined below, a lot of differences may appear in areas that consumers can't see on their own. You might get a general sense of quality by ...


7

Don't cut hubs or respace hubs for this purpose. People who say to do that don't understand how compromised the left to right side tension disparity becomes. And it's not possible with a nonstandard axle set like the one you propose. Which way to go really depends on whether you're talking about modernizing the drivetrain. You can just respace the frame to ...


6

You can run different wheels in the front and back (different brands are fine). Heck, some bicycles have different sizes in the front and back (and are sold that way; 96ers and 69ers are examples)! The only thing you need to make sure is that the wheel fits in the frame and the brakes work.


6

I have a Cateye Double Wireless, and I was surprised at how much the tire circumference in the instructions varied from what I was measuring and observing. I run 700x25C Gatorskins, and the Cateye instructions said to use a circumference of 2105mm, but I was measuring a circumference of 2155mm, when the tire was inflated on my wheel. That's more than a 2% ...


6

When I bought the carbon 50mm wheels, I put on the yellow velo plugs. I had more plugs than necessary and I made sure the plugs fit snugly into each hole. Some plugs didn't. But I had enough plugs to choose from. Its been over 2 years and I have not experienced any loss of plugs. During those 2 years I had numerous punctures, front and rear and a change ...


6

In the context of a new bike spec list or marketing copy, it's most commonly understood to mean a wheelset and tires that are both tubeless-compatible, plus the rims already have tubeless tape. It's ready for tubeless in the sense that all you have to do is unseat one bead, remove the tube, add a tubeless valve, add sealant, re-seat the one bead, slosh the ...


5

As an owner of both 650c and 700c-wheeled bikes will happily share my thoughts. First of all, 650c wheels are lighter and obviously smaller which makes the whole ride more dynamic which can improve your maneuverability. On the other hand, 650c wheels are prone to sliding on stones or corners so you must be more careful when riding. 650c wheels spin faster ...


5

Look on your tire for the proper size. Different tire sizes change the overall diameter of the wheel and amount of distance traveled per revolution of your wheel.


5

First, note that if you're using indexed shifters that you need to match the number of cogs on the cassette to the shifters. Cheap wheels are normally not worth the money -- you'll have trouble keeping them true or from failing, especially in a difficult situation like mountain biking. On freewheels and cassette installation, I'd suggest reading this link ...


5

There are many ways to approach this problem. The WORST thing you can do is not involve the rider in the decision making process. If the rider is comfortable riding, perhaps all you need is a regular bike with a toe clip (as pictured) or a clipless MTB shoe with a cleat underneat, and a matching pedal. SPD would be the most commonly known style. There's ...


5

The tire change would have been the biggest change, the ALLTERRAINasaurus is a knobby tire, while the Lugano is a slick road tire. Years back I used an ALLTERRAINasaurus and it had to be one of the slowest touring tires I have used in my life. Some earlier versions I later found out also had an incredibly stiff casing making it even less efficient. I ...


5

The part which is broken is called the flange of the hub, however these aren't replaceable. You'd need a whole new hub or wheel.


5

As comments to the question state, in terms of wheel diameter alone, 29" and 700c monikers indicate the same rim diameter. Your bike, being Surly, should be able to fit just about anything in terms of wheel diameters and tire widths, up to 27.5"×3.0" (650C) and 29"×2.6" (700c). However, according to the frame specifications of the latest Ogre model, the ...


5

The rim size is immaterial to the strength of the set you choose. Many rim brake 650b rims out there would not make good tandem rims, but there are exceptions. The VO Voyager or Diagonale in 36h are the main ones I can think of. Sun CR-18s are another, cheaper possibility. Also Velocity Cliffhanger or Atlas. 650b is likely the right choice for a ...


4

I'm assuming that when you say the "wheel" has a size of 622x15c listed on it, you mean the rim and not the tire. As others have mentioned, the tire size is what you need. Almost any 700c tire will fit on your rim, assuming that your frame has the clearance to accommodate it. Once you've got your tire on there, check the size listed on it and match it up ...


4

Threads are a locking mechanism. The issue is simply the threads are easily damaged and do not properly tighten. They can distort from over tightening, crack ect. To say anti seize does not lubricate is nonsense, that's exactly what it does. It allows the threads slip, tightening properly. The pops you hear removing the nipples are the threads gripping each ...


4

To me, gravel bikes seem mostly like cross bikes with a bit more money they can take from your wallet. 1) Road and mountain shifters and derailleurs don't play nice with each other at 11 speed, so this question is moot. If you want to check a particular crankset on the bike, look at the width and the type of BB setup. I don't see why you'd want to switch ...


4

I would look at wheelsets that are for your specific riding style. if you're looking to choose a full wheelset from a specific manufacturer (e.g. Mavic) that includes all of hub/rim/spokes and even tire, then go to their websites for more information. These are generally lighter than a normal wheel that you can build up yourself. If you want to build up one ...


4

First of all, you need to rid yourself of the idea that "It can't be top-notch if it's made in China". Don't let all the cheap junk that comes out of China make you think they don't manufacture top-quality products. When you buy Zipps, you're not just paying for the decals... free-market competition sees that this doesn't happen, at least not much. Name-...


4

Since the question was asked, high-performance carbon wheels for drop bar bikes are evolving towards an internal width of 22-25mm - that is, wheels aimed at both performance road and gravel bikes. I am not sure how alloy wheels for drop bar bikes are evolving, but I suspect they will follow (White Industries already makes an alloy rim with a 25mm internal ...


4

I assume you mean that your current tire is 27.5x1.90. Rim widths are defined by internal width and external width. Regarding the tire the internal width is important. As rims and tires for mountain bikes are becoming wider and wider, rim manufacturer often specify the recommended tire width for a rim and tire manufacturer specify the recommended rim widths....


4

The bike was likely assembled with conventional tubes and tires on wheels that accept tubeless tires. If you were to go tubeless it would require new tires and valve stem assemblies. Adding sealant would be a good option during assembly, plus the shop's labor charge.


3

If you look at the ETRTO specification of a tire you are thinking of using, e.g. 47-406 (a 20 x 1.9" tire) the total diameter of the mounted tire will be pretty close to the rim diameter plus twice the tire width: 406+2*47 = 500mm ~ 19.7". (the designation 20" wheel here comes from the diameter of the common 50-406 tire). The width of the tire will vary ...


3

It's rare for a manufacturer to have different wheel sizes for the same model, but it does happen sometimes. Fortunately, it's easy to check the wheel size, it's always printed or embossed somewhere on the tires. Yours will probably say 700c or 622mm or 28 inch - these are all equivalent. One other thing you'll have to consider is the rear dropout spacing. ...


3

You don't mention what is mismatched about the wheel set, but if it fits the bike it is hard to imagine what kind of problems you might have. The worst that I can think of is at you'd alter the geometry a bit – for example if you have a 27" rear wheel and a 700c front you'd be making the frame angles (relative to the ground) a bit steeper. I've been riding ...


3

A 6 speed bike has 126 mm rear spacing while more modern wheels will need 130 mm rear spacing (which you can fix by cold setting the frame). If you're getting a new front wheel too, you will need to do this to the fork as well (likely). If you go 7 speed and up, you can get a cassette wheel, but if your Tempo has indexed shifting, you'll need to use friction ...


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