Hot answers tagged

43

You don't have pictures of the bike, but honestly, theres not much you need to worry about. Pump up the tires and make sure they hold air. Check that the brakes work (may need new pads, cables). Add a new chain and you're likely good to go. A lot of bikes live outside their whole lives (in rain and snow) and aren't worse for the wear.


31

You have commented I mainly use the back brake. I therefore propose option 4: improve your braking technique before spending any money. If you only use half of your bicycle's brakes, you can't expect to stop quickly. Further, you're using much less than half your available braking force, because the back brake is much less effective than the front one. ...


25

Most road bikes are the equivalent of an open-top racing car. You just don't ride them in the rain. And if you do, you are expected to be hard core enough that a little rain isn't worth the weight and aerodynamic drag that the fenders would cause. And there's also a reason that hardcore racers wear sunglasses during the day or transparent glasses in the ...


25

A chain left outside for a long period, unless freshly oiled beforehand (or in a desert), will be ruined. The rest is worth checking over by someone experienced, but the bike can probably be saved by replacing routine components, and it's probably worth doing. I'd expect to change the brake pads as well (another cheap consumable). The cassette (rear gears)...


22

The trick is to blow the water back up the tube and into the reservoir right after you take a drink. This will keep your tube and bite valve from freezing. This works well even at below freezing temperatures when skiing.


20

I can only speak from my experience, as a winter rider in Norway (around the capital). When the winter sets in I usually just end up putting more clothes on myself, and studded tires on my bike. I avoid hard biking (biking so that I get tired, breathing heavy) when it's below minus 10/15 degrees C, because breathing in such cold air can be damaging for your ...


19

First: merino wool boxers. EDIT: Also windproof boxers, see other answer below Second: Vest and short tights are very little for ~5°C, raining. You are losing a huge amount of body heat through your arms and legs, and this leaves little for body parts without active muscles. Wear more, and your balls will be warmer too.


18

I am also wearing a waterproof jacket over it which isn't very breathable Well there's your problem. The most wickable, breathable material in the world isn't going to achieve those properties if you put a plastic bag over it. If you don't want to be caught out in the rain, keep the raincoat in a backpack/messengerbag/pannier/whatever until it's needed. ...


18

A scientific Journal, Chest Journal, published an article about the efficiency of heat exchange masks on asthmatic subjects during cold weather exercise. They found that the heat exchanger masks were at least as effective as pre-treatment with albuterol in preventing decline in lung function. I found several commercial heat exchange masks which could ...


17

I've been an ice biker for 10+ years in as cold as -20C (-5F) in the Black Hills of South Dakota and West Michigan US. Safety in winter cycling comes down to your gear both for your bike and your person. Bike Rear Rack with water resistant panniers (I recommend Ortlieb) - This keeps your center of gravity low and adds extra weight to your back tire for ...


15

Why not add a fairing? There are designs that add a windshield, some that provide protection down to the knee, some that go further down, and in the extreme case there's full nose-cones. This will deflect a lot of the wind around you instead of into you. You're already riding a recumbent, a fairing isn't going to make it any worse, and the weight penalty ...


14

I think there is a case to be made that you will be less visible in dark colours. Anecdotally whenever I look down the road at a group of cyclists, it's the ones in large blocks of bold colours (not necessarily fluorescent) whom I can spot first. Bright but mixed patterns of colour are also less visible from a distance. I'm not saying anyone should be ...


13

keeping your face warm while winter bike commuting I recommend ski googles and Seirus "Masque" over a balaclava. This mask only covers the bottom half of your face, and can be paired with merino wool hat worn underneath a helmet. This is more versatile, as you can remove the mask, but still wear the hat off-bike. I also use a scarf underneath my jacket to ...


13

The current generation of pre-manufactured winter tires you'd get from brands like Schwalbe do not use 'screw-in' style studs that have a point on the inside surface. They have a pocket and flange design: I don't know of a source for actual data on this other than personal anecdote, so I can offer that. I have never had the stud on a commercially made/...


12

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


12

It depends a lot on you. I live in Illinois and I'll go out in a T-shirt and shorts in the 40's for bike rides. But if you want some additional warmth in the around 40F and 3 miles, I'd say maybe some thin gloves (I have a set of Underarmour coldgear running gloves which are useful for longer rides in the 30s) and a hoodie - you might be cold for the first ...


12

First you need to decide what's limiting your braking. If it's the tyres on the road skidding -- or you're having to back off the brakes to avoid that -- then changing your tyres might help. But tread might not be what you need on a smooth surface. If you can apply the brakes quite hard without skidding, and still slow down less than you'd like, look at ...


12

For most parts of the body a second layer of moderately wind-blocking fabric makes a massive difference -- so another pair of unpadded cycling shorts would go a long way. The rain is likely to have been part of the issue though -- windchill on wet skin (or wet porous fabric) is a big deal. Waterproof overtrousers would deal with that but tend to get ...


12

I work for a distributor that sells several brands of winter studded tires and everyone of them comes with this warning, this particular one is from Schwalbe In order to ensure that spikes are permanently fixed, tires should be run in for about 25 miles (40km) on asphalt, while avoiding any fast acceleration or heavy braking. Source With this said i don'...


11

I suffered from foggy glasses a lot, I prefer to wear clear lenses since I tend to ride after dark frequently. I tried a few of different cycling glasses with clear lenses, eyeglasses with anti-fog coating, motorcycle goggles, and several pairs of safety glasses with no luck. I finally found a pair of $9 MSA Safety Works safety goggles with anti fog coating ...


11

I see snowboarders with an insulating cover over the tube. If that doesn't provide enough insulation, I've worn my pack under my jacket leaving the entire pack, tube and bite valve covered and insulated. Here is a 3 foot Hydration Pack Insulated Drink Tube Cover on amazon for $7 US


11

I have seen people trailer them, but for a local race here, many people go car free and strap them to the top tube extending back behind the seat, usually onto the rack. Found many images using google image search for "carry skis on bike" http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5132/5471607772_40dc377ed0_o.jpg


11

Batteries, especially most types of rechargeables don't work well in cold conditions. The chemical reaction that powers the electric voltage does needs some temperature to perform as intended. If you then have a consumer load that requires a bigger amount of power, they tend to drain rather quickly since they cannot set free much energy when cold. You could ...


11

There are two reasons why it might not work: The batteries don't like the cold. Many battery chemistries don't like the cold -- notably alkaline, manganese (heavy-duty), and NiMH/NiCad batteries. To test this hypothesis, put your light (or even just the batteries) in your freezer. If your light gets weaker the colder it gets, this is your problem (...


11

Wind proof boxers which have a layer of windbreaking material in the “package” area make a big difference. They are commonly used by cross country skiers so can be found at stores that cater to the outdoor sport market. Here are a couple examples: Store Link Store Link Store 1 Store 2


10

From a theoretical point of view, there are some possible methods to take water out of a fabric object, such as a shoe: "Replacing" the water for another, faster drying liquid and letting it evaporate; Squeezing the water out directly by compression and twisting (not usually adviseable); "Force field" like gravity and centrifugation; Capilary action (which ...


10

As one comment has indicated, you may need to evaluate if cold this extreme is even safe to ride in. If you determine that is is, there are several issues you'll need to address. There are a lot of questions here about winter cycling. I went through question with the winter tag. Here are some of the ones applicable to your situation: Breathing may be a ...


10

You will get wet if you ride at speed on a wet road without fenders. I think you can find fenders to fit almost any road bike if you want them, but otherwise I can think a few things that mitigate the problem: Change clothes shortly after the end of the ride, and wash and dry yourself if facilities are available. Wear tight cycling clothes. You will still ...


10

If you have to ask, I'd say it's likely the answer is no. If you have lived in Canada all your life and own appropriate gear to those temperatures, you probably have a better chance. I have been commuting and riding/racing in temperatures similar to and lower than those for several years. Prepping a bike for such temperatures is fairly involved and likely ...


10

Let it air dry (and/or wipe it dry as much as you can) and move on with your life. Don't put it near a heater, cause that isn't good for the rubber stuff. Re-lube the chain. What gets you in winter is not so much the snow/ice, but the salt (which doesn't affect your bike if its just standing there). In this case, if you have the time and space to bring the ...


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