Hot answers tagged

43

You don't have pictures of the bike, but honestly, theres not much you need to worry about. Pump up the tires and make sure they hold air. Check that the brakes work (may need new pads, cables). Add a new chain and you're likely good to go. A lot of bikes live outside their whole lives (in rain and snow) and aren't worse for the wear.


32

You have commented I mainly use the back brake. I therefore propose option 4: improve your braking technique before spending any money. If you only use half of your bicycle's brakes, you can't expect to stop quickly. Further, you're using much less than half your available braking force, because the back brake is much less effective than the front one. ...


26

A chain left outside for a long period, unless freshly oiled beforehand (or in a desert), will be ruined. The rest is worth checking over by someone experienced, but the bike can probably be saved by replacing routine components, and it's probably worth doing. I'd expect to change the brake pads as well (another cheap consumable). The cassette (rear gears)...


25

Here's my solution. Take off wheels, pedals, and handlebars, and place the bike under the bed. Ok, that may not be the right solution, but it might point you in the right direction. If you start taking parts off your bike, you can fit it in a pretty small place. You might even want to consider taking parts off and storing everything but the frame inside ...


24

-20C is -4F, cold enough to be uncomfortable for humans, but not particularly cold for mechanical equipment. You will notice that lubricants get stiffer, but generally they warm up rapidly when you ride and the stiffness will be gone in a minute or two. Hydraulic fluids, et al, should be good to -35C or below, though they will stiffen before that, ...


23

Most road bikes are the equivalent of an open-top racing car. You just don't ride them in the rain. And if you do, you are expected to be hard core enough that a little rain isn't worth the weight and aerodynamic drag that the fenders would cause. And there's also a reason that hardcore racers wear sunglasses during the day or transparent glasses in the ...


21

Studded tires are a must on ice. They are expensive, but well worth it! A couple of points to consider that have not been mentioned: Footwear: Winter specific riding shoes or boots. For mountain biking and cross, I ride with Lake boots. On the road, I use an older pair of road shoes that have been stretched to accommodate thick wool socks and neoprene shoe ...


21

The trick is to blow the water back up the tube and into the reservoir right after you take a drink. This will keep your tube and bite valve from freezing. This works well even at below freezing temperatures when skiing.


20

I can only speak from my experience, as a winter rider in Norway (around the capital). When the winter sets in I usually just end up putting more clothes on myself, and studded tires on my bike. I avoid hard biking (biking so that I get tired, breathing heavy) when it's below minus 10/15 degrees C, because breathing in such cold air can be damaging for your ...


19

First: merino wool boxers. EDIT: Also windproof boxers, see other answer below Second: Vest and short tights are very little for ~5°C, raining. You are losing a huge amount of body heat through your arms and legs, and this leaves little for body parts without active muscles. Wear more, and your balls will be warmer too.


18

A scientific Journal, Chest Journal, published an article about the efficiency of heat exchange masks on asthmatic subjects during cold weather exercise. They found that the heat exchanger masks were at least as effective as pre-treatment with albuterol in preventing decline in lung function. I found several commercial heat exchange masks which could ...


17

I live in Yakutsk, Russia, where the temperature sometimes drops as low as -45 °C. I don't think anything can break if all your parts are in good condition. But I think you shouldn't let your bike stay out in the cold for too long. I suspect the oil in the suspension fork can freeze, temporarily changing it into a rigid fork. You will need ice tires if you ...


17

I am also wearing a waterproof jacket over it which isn't very breathable Well there's your problem. The most wickable, breathable material in the world isn't going to achieve those properties if you put a plastic bag over it. If you don't want to be caught out in the rain, keep the raincoat in a backpack/messengerbag/pannier/whatever until it's needed. ...


17

I've been an ice biker for 10+ years in as cold as -20C (-5F) in the Black Hills of South Dakota and West Michigan US. Safety in winter cycling comes down to your gear both for your bike and your person. Bike Rear Rack with water resistant panniers (I recommend Ortlieb) - This keeps your center of gravity low and adds extra weight to your back tire for ...


15

Well, this probably sounds gross and I'm kind of reluctant to say it, but I'm able to blow the snot out of my nose without hitting myself or my bike. I try to only do it when there's no one around, but occasionally that isn't possible. Basically, I turn my head so my nostrils are towards the ground and exhale forcibly through my nose. I'm not sure it will ...


15

Why not add a fairing? There are designs that add a windshield, some that provide protection down to the knee, some that go further down, and in the extreme case there's full nose-cones. This will deflect a lot of the wind around you instead of into you. You're already riding a recumbent, a fairing isn't going to make it any worse, and the weight penalty ...


14

I think there is a case to be made that you will be less visible in dark colours. Anecdotally whenever I look down the road at a group of cyclists, it's the ones in large blocks of bold colours (not necessarily fluorescent) whom I can spot first. Bright but mixed patterns of colour are also less visible from a distance. I'm not saying anyone should be ...


13

Bike-specific full-finger gloves are generally going to give you more dexterity, allowing you finer control over shifters and brake levers. They'll also have padding in the places you need it when riding. However, very few of these gloves will be warm enough for winter riding. The best solution I've found is to ride with a few layers of gloves, using full-...


13

Wrapping with plastic for a season will result in trapping moisture, instead of keeping it out. Moisture will penetrate unless you do something extreme like vacuum-sealing (which isn't practical in this case). You're better off making sure the bike is well-covered to keep off precipitation, but can also breathe to allow excess moisture to evaporate. GuyZee'...


13

keeping your face warm while winter bike commuting I recommend ski googles and Seirus "Masque" over a balaclava. This mask only covers the bottom half of your face, and can be paired with merino wool hat worn underneath a helmet. This is more versatile, as you can remove the mask, but still wear the hat off-bike. I also use a scarf underneath my jacket to ...


12

Here a few other considerations: Make sure bike is 100% dry Yes oil chain and all other gears, bearings etc... If bike is steel, oil or repaint any exposed metal If bike steel, add nice layer of car wax and buff If bike is carbon, polish with Lemon fresh wood furniture polish If saddle is leather polish'er up with some mink oil or other leather conditioner ...


12

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


12

It depends a lot on you. I live in Illinois and I'll go out in a T-shirt and shorts in the 40's for bike rides. But if you want some additional warmth in the around 40F and 3 miles, I'd say maybe some thin gloves (I have a set of Underarmour coldgear running gloves which are useful for longer rides in the 30s) and a hoodie - you might be cold for the first ...


12

First you need to decide what's limiting your braking. If it's the tyres on the road skidding -- or you're having to back off the brakes to avoid that -- then changing your tyres might help. But tread might not be what you need on a smooth surface. If you can apply the brakes quite hard without skidding, and still slow down less than you'd like, look at ...


12

For most parts of the body a second layer of moderately wind-blocking fabric makes a massive difference -- so another pair of unpadded cycling shorts would go a long way. The rain is likely to have been part of the issue though -- windchill on wet skin (or wet porous fabric) is a big deal. Waterproof overtrousers would deal with that but tend to get ...


12

I work for a distributor that sells several brands of winter studded tires and everyone of them comes with this warning, this particular one is from Schwalbe In order to ensure that spikes are permanently fixed, tires should be run in for about 25 miles (40km) on asphalt, while avoiding any fast acceleration or heavy braking. Source With this said i don'...


11

There's no great way. The main problem is that inhaled cold air causes an automatic reaction in the nasal passages to create more mucous. And to a degree simply having cold air blowing against the face around the sinuses creates the problem. Some people will experience this worse than others. You can try using some sort of scarf or maybe a surgical mask ...


11

I suffered from foggy glasses a lot, I prefer to wear clear lenses since I tend to ride after dark frequently. I tried a few of different cycling glasses with clear lenses, eyeglasses with anti-fog coating, motorcycle goggles, and several pairs of safety glasses with no luck. I finally found a pair of $9 MSA Safety Works safety goggles with anti fog coating ...


11

I see snowboarders with an insulating cover over the tube. If that doesn't provide enough insulation, I've worn my pack under my jacket leaving the entire pack, tube and bite valve covered and insulated. Here is a 3 foot Hydration Pack Insulated Drink Tube Cover on amazon for $7 US


11

I have seen people trailer them, but for a local race here, many people go car free and strap them to the top tube extending back behind the seat, usually onto the rack. Found many images using google image search for "carry skis on bike" http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5132/5471607772_40dc377ed0_o.jpg


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