Hot answers tagged

18

Winter riding is hard on a bike - I have to do weekly maintenance when it's a period of wet riding. It's good to have N+1 options. If you're serious about riding in the snow, then the snowbike would likely have mudguards/fenders, some lighting suitable for the darker/shorter days. You could go further and fit the snowbike with handgrip warmers and pogs/...


12

With cars, and above a certain latitude, it's common to own one set of wheels (with fancy/light rims) for summer and another set (with ugly/heavy rims) for winter. Agree, at least in Finland we do that. However, my winter wheelset has neither ugly nor heavy rims. The rims are exactly the same alloy like the summer rims. The main difference is that there are ...


11

I am (or was, in the pre-pandemic world) a winter commuter in Canada. The studless winter tires are great for everything except actual ice and much more pleasant on bare pavement. If you need to actually ride on ice (rather than glide over an occasional small patch) you should really get studs. My current commute requires riding in the road through a few ...


10

Based on experience with studless tires for cars: These tires look like they're optimized bare asphalt and packed snow. On slick ice they may have better grip than normal bicycle tires but nowhere near studded tires. In soft snow they are likely to be more slippery than tires with knobby tread. I would consider them for conditions where roads are rarely icy ...


6

I think it depends a lot on your local conditions. How cold does it get? How often/much does it snow? How well are your roads maintained? Do the authorities do a good job of clearing/gritting them? Here on the east coast of Scotland, it doesn't snow too much, but it is a very wet climate, which combined with freezing temperatures overnight, icy roads are ...


5

The vast majority, perhaps all, road bikes sold today (in 2021) have 700c wheels. Majority yes, not all. 650B for allroad/gravel/rando, 650C for some tri/TT and small adult road bikes, 26" (559) for some other small adult road bikes of various subgenres, and all the 24 inch sizes for youth road and cross bikes - 507, 520, and 540 24" specimens all ...


4

They are only a good choice if you ride on roads and are fairly sure that you won’t encounter smooth ice. Normal road bike tyres (e.g. Conti GP4000s) are surprisingly horrible in winter conditions. Even a thin layer of snow slush on tarmac can make riding dangerous and difficult. Much worse than just wet road. You’d think the tyre would just press through ...


3

It’s a good idea and I used to do exactly that when I was still a student and didn’t have the money or space for a second bike. After all, a cyclocross is pretty much just a road bike with more tyre clearance. Depending on the specific model this can also be true for gravel bikes. I used 4 different sets of tyres throughout the year: Conti GP4000s 23mm tyres ...


3

In cold weather, having a runny nose can make you want to stop and spit, but the runny nose itself is an issue too. If you're like me, having mucus constantly overflowing your nostrils, dripping down your face is extremely uncomfortable. One can stop and blow one's nose and wipe the face every couple minutes to alleviate it, but that's time-consuming and is ...


2

Most winter tires I know of have the ability to be run studded or studless. So choosing to have studs added to your tires is a personal choice. In all cases that I know of a stud is inserted in a spot on the tire that has a hole pocket cut for a stud. I also have had ran many winter tires just by removing the studs for use during the summer. Does this ...


2

For mechanical reasons, my wet-day bikes are both unavailable, so today I rode to work on my nice road bike. It has an "ass-saver" but nothing more. The rain was torrential. I got wet. I got so wet my shoes had puddles inside them. My work pants were so dirty with road grime that they looked like I'd had a fall. My gloves ran water like a tap ...


2

The label 29″ is likewise a misnomer. The inner diameter (the place where the rubber sits) of 29″ rims is precisely equal to that of 700c rims. I think that when you say inner diameter, you're thinking of the bead seat diameter. Briefly, your tire beads are what keep the tire locked onto the rim. The beads are designed to sit on a shelf in the rim. The ...


2

The smallest collection suitable for all three is one bike with one set of wheels. You pick a bike for the worst conditions, and accept that it might be a little sub-optimal for the best conditions. You would therefore pick a fat bike with studded tyres and accept it will be a little slow when used in the conditions in your first photo. If it's a commute ...


2

One bike and two sets of wheels, unless you're willing to both run tubes, and also change tires as needed, and also have the snow tires be a little borderline for the more extreme end of what you're talking about (the third picture) - in which case it's one bike with one set of wheels. There are different ways of going about this, but to give an example: the ...


2

My approach is two bikes, three wheelsets, and this approach is the one I recommend to cover all three scenarios. One of the bikes is a gravel / cyclocross / touring style drop bar bike that has adequate tire clearance for wide tires. It has summer wheels that I start to use when the sharp gravel preventing pedestrian injuries on slippery ice has been ...


2

(I upvoted @juhist because I think that's the clearest thinking so far, but I have enough comments to add that I'm constructing this answer too) Basically, my advice, based on decades of upper-Midwest winter rides, concurs with @juhist -- buy a fat bike if you want to ride deep unplowed snow, and a gravel bike otherwise. More comments on desirable features ...


1

Winter tires have a different rubber compound which provides greater traction once the temperature falls below 7 degrees. In cold climates, even if the air temperature is above this, the ground will often remain below this. There will provide better traction under 7 degrees than an all seasons compound which will become hard and lose traction when the ground ...


1

Generally studless tires are best in situations where the roads do not have ice and the vehicle does not depend on friction for stability. For example bicycles depend on friction for stability but cars do not. However, in practice you probably won't change your tires every day, so you have to estimate from the climate of the area whether studless or studded ...


1

One thing to consider is the effort to install a tire to the rim. Summer tires are thin and supple, so the effort to install a tire is minimal (unless the rim is a "tubeless compatible" rim in which case the effort can be Herculean). However, studded winter tires can be bit stiff, so you may not be able to install a tire in less than 5 minutes. For ...


1

A couple of years ago I bought these flimsy plastic fenders that I can snap on within a couple of seconds if I need to. Here you can see how bendy and flimsy they are. They don't offer great protection and I wouldn't recommend them as a permanent solution, but if you want to use your road bike for the occasional trip to the bakery, etc. these might be ...


1

"When one drives on a wet road then you get smashed by water and your clothes get dirty." Indeed, but those are dedicated sports clothes. One has to change them and get a shower at work even when everything is warm and dry. And when one just go for a casual ride, one should wash them immediately afterwards. It is like underwear, you better do not ...


1

My bike was outside all of ten hrs, and when I got on it I couldn't go any where!. My chain was so cold it was just sliding around the cassette. I had to walk home from work. So when I eventually arrived home I poured hot water over the chain and cassette. It done the trick, but it happened again. Its a pain!


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible