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enter image description here Is there any way to add pedals & training wheels to this balance bike?

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    It does not make sense to add training wheels to a balance bike - in fact, it defeats the purpose of buying one. The point of the balance bike is they learn to balance (without training wheels), then having the balance thing sorted, move to a bike and learn to work pedals. – mattnz May 23 '17 at 20:59
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    For some reason, this top gear episode springs to mind ;-) – Digital Trauma May 23 '17 at 23:03
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    There is no practical way to add pedals. – Daniel R Hicks May 24 '17 at 2:12
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    If the kid is going well enough to go over the bar chances are it's time to switch to a normal bike. In normal use feet can stop a balance bike. – user30065 May 24 '17 at 18:46
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    Even if you could modify a balance into a real bike, and even if it was a good idea, it seems extremely unlikely that it would be cost effective, vs. just buying a bike. – stannius May 24 '17 at 19:38
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You could probably add training wheels, but not a crank. There simply isn't anywhere on the frame for cranks to go. Also, adding training wheels to a balance bike is kind of defeating the purpose of a balance bike. It's meant to be an alternative to training wheels that allows the child to learn to steer into falls and "scoot" around and eventually learn to glide around before riding a bike with cranks on it. These have been pretty universally hailed as the best way to teach a younger child to ride. Oh, and with the shape of the frame, you may not be able to find an appropriate set of training wheels too, they would end up at a forward angle, and would be more likely to get in the way of the "scooting" action kids do on these bikes.

  • True, and even if the OP can weld the BB shell on, the seat stays are not wide enough to accommodate the chain itself. Not to mention the lack of toe clearance / road clearance when the cranks are on. – Mike Dec 16 '18 at 20:47
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No, not possible.

If you want to go the other way, buy a 12 inch bike and then remove the chain/pedals/bottom bracket/bearings and degrease it. Store the parts so they don't rust. Optionally put something over the ends of the BB tube to protect the threads, even some duct tape would help.

When the kid is old enough, refit all the transmission parts.

The plus side, the kid has one bike and may transition to pedals easier because its still the same bike.

Downsides, the rear wheel will have a sprocket unused, and the resulting bike will be heavier than the balance bike pictured above.


Do consider not using training wheels - a Balance Bike removes that need completely. Once the young rider can ride ~10 metres without touching the ground with their feet, they don't need training wheels.

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    +1 for "balance bike removes the necessity of training wheels" - tried it twice already, worked each time. – Mike Dec 16 '18 at 20:39

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