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I have butterfly shaped handlebars on my hybrid bicycle. These were an aftermarket addition.

These allow for different positions but I would like to add another set of handlebars with a wider position above the butterfly handlebars.

There is a component that allows this attachment of additional handlebars but I do not know what it is called. This looks like two bars with loops on each end and they are positioned on to the existing handlebars and affixed then to the additional handlebars above the existing.

Hybrid bicycle butterfly handlebars

Can anybody help with the name of this component and where to get them?

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    Are you referring to bar-ends - little stubby arms intended for MTB flat bars? Or do you mean tri-bars / aerobars which bolt on top of your existing bars for additional aerodynamic improvements ? – Criggie Feb 25 '20 at 19:24
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    (later) ...or a bike with legitimately a second handlebar, like sheldonbrown.com/org/thorn/images/thorn.jpg ? – Criggie Feb 25 '20 at 21:53
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    I cannot find bar ends that would fit onto the butterfly bars to make the hand positions wider & closer to me to give a cruiser handlebar position. So I was thinking to buy cruiser handle bars & mount them above the butterfly bars using those loop type attachments. – motionpotion Feb 26 '20 at 0:26
  • @Criggie I added a photo. I think the term for those bars on my bike is "Humpert" bars. They are adjustable. I'm trying to add bars above the humpert bars that come back like cruiser bars to give a more upright riding position or add extension bars onto existing bars. This would give me more options for position. – motionpotion Feb 26 '20 at 12:34
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From later comments - those loop-type attachments are only rated for attaching accessories like lights and so-forth.

These are NOT handlebars

enter image description here

They are intended to be used like this

enter image description here

If you want higher bars, then raise your bars with a higher stem. The dirty-hack described in JonR's excellent answer remains a workaround at best.

Always consider how you're going to get to the brakes in an emergency.

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    Those clamps, while probably strong enough set up like that, are much lighter than the ones used on aerobars (at least my cheap ones). In particular you probably couldn't do them up enough to avoid the accessory bar and clamps rotating about the true handlebar just when you need everything to be solid, such as when hitting a pothole. – Chris H Feb 26 '20 at 15:23
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The part you describe is similar to the bracket that is used to add a short bar to give more space for installing headlights and cycle computers. You can search for "bicycle handlebar extended bracket headlight mount bar" to find it. I have never seen it used for extra handlebars, and I'm not sure it could support the rider's weight during braking or hitting a big bump.

The question reminds me of a double handlebar custom bike described on sheldonbrown.com. It has a threadless fork with the lower set of handlebars clamped to the steering tube like normal. The star nut inside the steering tube is omitted to allow a quill stem to mount inside the steering tube, like with a threaded fork. Go read his description: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/org/thorn-index.html

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    Likewise, a threadless steerer with enough uncut could accommodate two stems. – whatsisname Feb 26 '20 at 5:44
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A solution similar to the Sheldon Brown bike would be to use a steerer extension which you would use to mount a second stem & bars. The 2nd stem could have a high rise to farther separate the two sets of bars.

If you do an internet search for "threadless steerer tube extender" you'll find some examples. Dimension makes a 115mm (4.5") extension. I'm assuming you have a 1-1/8" steerer. If you have a 1" steerer I don't know of any options beside buying a cheap used fork that has an uncut steerer tube... Which by the way may be a lower cost option if you have a local bike Co-Op or similar non-profit.

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  • Yes - concur. This way the brake levers will move up as well, and be far more usable in an emergency. – Criggie Feb 27 '20 at 3:42

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