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I was wondering if there are any strong and durable converters out there for a quick release skewer to convert to a thru axle. I ride a MTB and need something that won't break or fail for me. I don't want to buy a new fork that fits a thru axle after buying a new wheelset.

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    People have ridden QRs on MTB for decades. Just use what you've got, it'll be fine Apr 6, 2022 at 0:17
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    @whatsisname I'd say that's almost true (more details in my answer)
    – Chris H
    Apr 6, 2022 at 10:47
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    The problem is that so many people don't know how to close QRs in the proper manner.
    – Carel
    Apr 6, 2022 at 11:03
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    @Carel the external cam one mine came with loosened however tight I did it up, so closing the lever meant maxing out my grip strength squeezing against the chainstay. The new one holds with firm but modest hand pressure. Disc brakes may not help
    – Chris H
    Apr 6, 2022 at 12:04
  • @ChrisH: at times the serrated disks on both sides of the QR may get blunt. Although it's a time consuming exercise I've taken a thin triangular file to them. Works wonders.
    – Carel
    Apr 6, 2022 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

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You can't convert a QR bike to use a TA, sorry. Not without welding anyway.

The frame, specifically it's dropouts, control what you can use to retain the wheel's axle.

To use a through-axle, the end of the axle has to thread into the frame/fork, which has a threadded hole and not a dropout.

So the only option is to buy a frame/fork that uses a through-axle, and a compatible wheel hub, along with the axle itself. Be aware there are multiple standards and lengths, but a frame/fork should come with a suitable axle.


What might be confusing you is that some wheel hubs can be used with a QR or with a through-axle depending on which caps you fit to the outside.

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    Some of the convertible hubs more in theory, in practice finding the QR caps can be difficult. Before committing to such a hub ensure you can (easily) get the end caps.
    – mattnz
    Apr 6, 2022 at 5:24
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    ison-distribution.com/english/product.php?part=HXHAA15QRF Commonly available part from many manufacturers, works well
    – Noise
    Apr 6, 2022 at 8:13
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    @JoeK Yup - that looks to allow a TA wheel to be used in a QR frame. It does not provide any benefits of Through axles though.
    – Criggie
    Apr 6, 2022 at 9:31
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    You could go old-school, and use an axle with track-nuts. They're generally compatible with QR frames. Choice of hubs can be limited though.
    – Chris H
    Apr 6, 2022 at 10:36
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    @JoeK I understand that interpretation, seems perfectly reasonable.
    – MaplePanda
    Apr 6, 2022 at 21:03
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If you're worried about QR on MTB you don't need to be - or at least not very much, and not if you take sensible precautions.

As mentioned in the comments, QRs on MTBs were standard for decades.

I would suggest though that you look at the type/quality of your skewers. I upgraded my skewers from external cam to internal as the former tended to loosen. This happened much more at the back than the front and the back doesn't have lawyer lips to keep the wheel in, so I came rather too close to losing the back wheel landing a very small jump. With a good (Deore XT) internal cam skewer, that issue has gone away.

Unfortunately MTBs that sold with QRs recently were inherently built to a budget, and tend to have cheap external cam skewers.

I'm also fairly heavy and the only bent axle I've ever had was on my tourer, not my MTB.

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    I second the recommendation for internal cam skewers. Shimano make cheap ones, including below the XT and Ultegra level. Specialized and Bontrager did offer these at one point, but I haven't checked. For the record, Campagnolo also have them for sale, but they're relatively pricey and they may also be on the short side (130mm, as Campy is a roadie company).
    – Weiwen Ng
    Feb 20, 2023 at 20:03
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Yes you can convert a QR hub to fit a 15mm fork. All you need is the correct 15mm end caps to fit on your QR axle!!!

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    Welcome to Stack Exchange! Take caution that while this is true of many hubs, it might not be true of all hubs. For OEM wheels (i.e. the unbranded ones that come with many stock bikes), the bike manufacturer will be sourcing the hubs from a hub OEM supplier, but you don't know the maker or the model, and the bike manufacturer may or may not keep stock of the endcaps.
    – Weiwen Ng
    Feb 20, 2023 at 20:04
  • Also if you've got something odd like a dynamo, forget it
    – Chris H
    Feb 20, 2023 at 20:29
  • This is definitely not true for all QR hubs Feb 21, 2023 at 7:44

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