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I need to get new fenders/mudguards, and I also need to get a pannier rack.

As I understand it, these can sometimes be bought as one unit, they can obviously be bought separately, and I am not sure if one can buy them as a pair that are desgined to go together, but not actually welded together (i.e. could be used separately)

Between these 2/3 options, is there any general advice as to which is better.

Bike will be used pretty much just on road/paths, most for commuting, very old standard frame.

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    I vaguely recall once seeing a picture of a combo fender and pannier assembly, but it's certainly not common. I'm thinking the kit was designed for a full suspension bike where there was no good mounting for either, save by cantilevering off the seat post. – Daniel R Hicks Sep 20 '14 at 12:30
  • No, I've never seen combi panniers/fenders. The only thing that springs to mind is the faff of fitting them (might be easier to fit a single piece of kit than to get two bits of kit to boogie) but even this goes out of the window if you're planning on using your lbs – PeteH Sep 20 '14 at 15:06
  • Some racks have a lengthwise plate that could function as a fender. It is good for keeping your back clean, but doesn't cover the rest. – BPugh Sep 21 '14 at 23:52
  • @BPugh on the topeak super tourist (quite a nice rack if rather heavy, and some good bags for it) it doesn't even do that because the mud comes up too far back. I modded mine with the addition of a tail made from a very cheap plastic mudguard which made a huge difference. – Chris H Oct 7 '14 at 16:39
  • @ChrisH, yep I saw that with my Topeak Explorer rack as well. It kept my back clean but bag and light would get it (along with the rest of the bike). I ended up putting in some fenders to go with it and haven't looked back. I recommend the separate route because stuff happens. Both my rack and my fenders have been damaged in some way over time, and should the damage be a total loss, it would be much easier (and cheaper) to fix. – BPugh Oct 7 '14 at 18:18
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If your bicycle and riding style will permit it, I would certainly recommend getting "proper" fenders / mudguards which are close to the wheel and cover it a good portion of the way round. These will do the best job at keeping spray away from you and from the rest of the bike.

You say old standard frame - so that sounds like it may well have the right attachments for fenders / mudguards.

I spent many years commuting year round in London - 12 miles each way, and spent a great deal of time and bitter experience optimizing my set up. I tried different bike set ups and a variety of fenders / mudguards and by far the most effective were the SKS thermoplastic ones which sit very close to the wheel. They stop the most spray going up your back / butt and over the bike.

If the weather is reasonably inclement the difference between ok and good fenders is a lot…in my experience of riding through driving rain, sleet and snow!

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