17

One possibility is to mount the tail light on your bike's seat stays. As an example here are a couple pictures of my preferred tail light (the cygolite hotshot) mounted to the seat stay of a cross bike: There are a bunch of options out there for this sort of mounting, from lights specifically designed to be mounted on a seat stay to ones that come with seat ...


10

The problem is that you have to start considering the failure modes of the failure detection system. You're quite likely to end up with a less robust system or a lot of false alarms if you have a system designed to warn you of failure. You also have to consider what faults would be detected: a dead battery? You'd need another power source to feed your ...


9

As Stephan Matthiesen notes in the comments, if your pizza box is mounted on a standard bicycle rack, there are rear lights that attach to the rack and should be visible even with the box on the rack. Or you could do as Glenn Stevens suggests in his answer, and get a light that attaches to the seat stays of your bike. If you really want to attach a light ...


8

I run The Bike Light Database (which started from a series of blog posts on this very Stack Exchange site). The Cygolite Hotshot and the NiteRider Solas are actually two of my top recommended lights, and I specifically recommend a setup similar to what you're describing. From the recommended taillights page: Putting the Cygolite Hotshot on your rack or ...


8

The most important part of a vehicle light is the optics because you want a beam with a precise shape and distribution in order to illuminate the road evenly, without wasting light into the sky or blinding people coming in the other direction. These optics are very difficult and expensive to design. It is easy to make a circular lens which will throw half ...


5

Most modern lights use rechargeable lithium ion batteries. Those come in three form factors: Pouch cells, cylindrical cells and coin cells. Pouch cells come in a lot of different dimensions which gives manufacturers a lot of flexibility when designing the product. They also have cables directly attached and are quite fragile. Good for weight and size but bad ...


4

Velocity definitely make 305 rims, and at least when they were in Australia would use their available extrusions to make semi-custom rims to order - most often so you can get the number of spokes/drilling pattern you want, but they would also make odd sizes if the extrusion was compatible. But they've moved to the US and I have no idea what they're like now ...


4

That is definitely the Vis 180 70 lumen. This is the new packaging that L&M just debuted in late 2014 when the 70 lumen model came out. They sent the new design to the packaging manufacturer just before they got the Vis 180 upgraded to run at 70 lumens, so the white insert says 50 lumens when in fact it's 70 lumens (as shown on the outside sticker there)....


4

The brake detection is based on an accelerometer, and is not a complicated feature. I have had a similar feature on a Chinese front light and it worked ok from what I can see. So that's probably not a key reason to buy a branded light instead. Amazon are often parasitical in these products - AliExpress charges $11 for a similar (same?) thing https://www....


3

Here are just a few points that make lasers a less-than-ideal light source for road illumination purposes: Lasers are monochromatic. While there are some exceptions in the physical labs, all the lasers that are used in real life have a spectrum of a single, thin, highly energetic line. This is what gives lasers their highly saturated color. Of course, you ...


3

There are advantages of non-replaceable batteries (see other answers; I would point out to better weather sealing specifically), but you shouldn't care about them directly: you need to consider the ultimate usability. For commuting, you shouldn't care about weight too much, and this eliminates one of the main differences. My experience is this: In general, ...


3

Yes, you can absolutely run two tail lights off a hub dynamo, and a few people do. I've done it, but only as an experiment when I happened to have two tail lights. Modern LED rear lights draw much less than 500mW, because otherwise they would be unreasonably bright. My "500mW superflash" battery rear light draws about 100mW continuous, varying from about ...


3

You could try something like the fibre flare on either side of the rack They can be found at http://fibreflare.com/ and they also do a range of different colours for the side if you don't want to do red on the side of the rack. http://fibreflare.com/collections/fibre-flare-side-light-colours


3

If you go to any reasonably well stocked bike shop (or the bike department of a large department store) they will have a fair assortment of bike lights and reflectors. In particular there are a lot of different battery-powered LED flashers available: Mounting the light/reflector sometimes requires a bit of ingenuity, but you can often do pretty well using ...


3

It's an easy modification to make if they use the same voltage and have simple on/off switches. I've done it on an e-bike. But I'd only make the primary tail light share a switch with the headlight. Without a backup you've introduced a single point of failure which is a bad thing even if your wiring is rock solid. A single wire heading to (multiple) rear ...


3

There are four things you need to know: Almost all (99%) of bicycle "dynamos" are in fact AC alternators and they produce alternating current (3~6 VAC) with a current limiter (usually 1A max). The frequency of the AC varies by speed. Most dynamos tie one of the output legs to frame ground (neutral). The dynamo manual will tell you which, but if you don't ...


2

Most of the Busch & Müller IQ Dynamo lights seem to have this feature. Their lights have a well designed beam pattern, si it's hard to tell whether they're on or off during the daytime. So they have a pair of indicator LEDs on the back of the light, one for the front light, and one for the rear light. On my light they're orange and green, so it's easy to ...


2

The Gazelle Power Vision taillight has no independent manual. As it is only sold on a bike, the manual for the bike contains the information you need. You can determine if there is an automatic function built in to the light by checking the power switch. If the power switch only has 2 positions, you have a manual only light. If there are 3 positions, then ...


2

How would I search for something like this on amazon or elsewhere? rear light aero seatpost This works on Amazon and elsewhere.


2

Reflective tape is the way to go if you have a big surface area. I'm not going to link to a product because it is easy enough to find.


2

Here's my suggestion: you'll need one piece of 1" PVC plumbing pipe, and two end caps to suit. Probably want some sealant too, or get threadded end caps. I suggest a 1" tube because its a standard size, and many older seat posts are 1", so light clamps should work at this size. Its very commonly white too which helps visibility, but you could paint it ...


2

Why not just a regular seat post rear light on that thick tubing pointed to the side? You can also get small lights on the spokes.


2

This appears to be the one in the diagram you linked: http://www.amazon.com/D-Toplight-Rear-Light-Design-backlight/dp/B000NW65U4/ That one requires external power from a dynamo hub, though I have seen references online to a battery-powered version of the same light. The same company, Busch & Müller, makes a few others with the same mounting system. In ...


2

Rack upper eyelets of that sort don't have a standard distance between them, so there are no off-the-shelf brackets that would attach to both of them and center the light, if that's what you're thinking. Busch and Mueller makes a bunch of brackets that let you mount 50mm and 80mm generator lights (yours is 50) intended for rack mounting and stick them to ...


2

You mention riding from dusk to dawn. That's a rare situation. Most buyers of lights do fairly short rides, at least the after dark bit of the ride, and may want daytime flashing. Being able to charge a light with a phone charger is more convenient in that case, and phone chargers are ubiquitous unlike NiMH chargers. Then much of that niche overnight riding ...


1

Not a bicycle light, but Wicked Lasers has an add-on called Phosforce to their blue Arctic handheld laser that converts the blue laser light to bright white light. It's a phosphor screen that fluoresces when hit by the blue light, just as the coating on the inside wall of a fluorescent tube produces white light when excited by the ultraviolet photons ...


1

I've never seen a laser-based front light for a bike, though I have seen rear lights that use a laser to draw "virtual cycle lane" markings on the ground. These have conventional red LEDs as their rear-facing illumination, and the laser or lasers are used to draw the line. Also the example I saw was broken.... These rear lights use either one, two, or ...


1

The ANT+ lights standard allows for "0" switches to turn on/off bike lights. (Besides the initial power on of the head unit) I run a bontrager flare rt with my edge 820 and it works great. Completely wireless, it automatically adjusts brightness, and even has a "brake light mode".


1

@Plasma says: I got it working! You're right @Carel, the frame itself wasn't negative, but the back fender somehow was. I didn't check if the entire frame was positive, though, so can't say anyrhing about insulated wires or not. Anyhow, the problem seems to have been a missing connection between the positive and the taillight bulb. I DIYed a new socket for ...


1

My main question is "why is side visibility so important?" If you're riding on a road and you have a good tail light and headlight, you shouldn't have side impacts unless you're running stop lights or stop signs or something. However, there are some options. Scotchlite tape is a fantastic thing, though passive (but with a decent range of angles with ...


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