45

You will likely be found at fault. Bicycle lanes are considered a lane of traffic that supports only one type of traffic for extended periods of time (i.e., bicycles). As such, by your description you signaled your intent, then turned right across another lane of traffic and collided with another vehicle already occupying that lane. It is your job to ensure ...


24

To ride in the dark is difficult. You should have a decent head light on your helmet so it tracks your vision, and a handlebar light that tracks where your front wheel is aiming. In addition you should have a secondary front light and two back lights for redundancy. We don't make product recommendations here, but that would be the minimum. To increase ...


16

Keep riding. It will take a little while to come back, but it will come back. Just don't push yourself too hard, as you will be tense and stiff and those things can lead to another accident. For all practical purposes your skill limit has decreased, so riding at your old limit is riding beyond your limit until you get past the mental block caused by the ...


14

You don't give a location, which makes this question unanswerable for your individual case. However, since there are general answers for the North American situation, I'd like to give a European perspective as well. In most European legislations the cyclist has priority in your situation and you are only allowed to cross the bike lane when you can do so ...


13

Thankfully I never ride without gloves. The light weight gloves with padded leather in the palms is all you need - they are cheap, comfortable and effective - what more could you ask for. I had a crash after my bike was tampered with and the front wheel fell off. I am a programmer, and although I emptied the company first aid kit of dressings, and could not ...


13

I don't think anyone can give you a valid answer from a photo. Is there a fine crack there? Who knows? Certainly, no one can tell from a photo. Are the forks bent unevenly or beyond their design specs, leading to handling problems? Again, who knows? Personally, I would replace it without further ado. It's steel, so although that does mean it can ...


13

In the near term it's reasonably safe -- the dent is not sufficiently deep to seriously weaken the tube (though one does need to be concerned about the integrity of the welds on the rest of the bike, given it's been in an accident). In the far term (10s of thousands of miles) there's danger that the tube will fatigue and become weakened at the dent. (The ...


11

According to Santa Barbara City Ordinances: 10.52.130 No Bicycles on Sidewalk. No person shall ride a bicycle on any sidewalk except at a driveway; provided, that a person may ride a bicycle on any area designated by the City Council as a bikeway. So, unless this was a designated "bikeway," you were clearly in violation of at least one law. I'm a little ...


10

At some point you are still on the bike, but the mistake has already been made and you are looking for the exit option that will minimise damage. Jamming the front brake on while in a tight corner does not 'minimise damage' Experience rider would have probably seen the debris earlier or not been riding as fast, and is always thinking what alternatives they ...


9

Since having a car-on-bike accident last year due to me performing an Idaho stop, and the driver not stopping at all, I feel like my riding habits have changed a lot, and I realized how bad other people's riding habits tend to be. I don't always put my foot down when getting to an intersection, but I usually come to a stop and do a trackstand for a split ...


9

Outside pedal down and your weight on the outside foot, that 's how we were taught at the cycling school of the cycling club. You may angle the inside leg more or less away from the bike if you want to turn faster (cf. moto GP racers).


8

There is plenty of advice about gloves under the Gloves tag. See especially the question "What's the purpose of cycling gloves?" and one of the answers. From which you see that I recommend ordinary cycling gloves. Your purpose is their purpose. But I suggest that while you should be wearing gloves, you also should pay attention to how you ride, and where ...


8

Consider for a moment that you walked away with your life, instead of being killed by that car, and call it a victory. Some people don't walk away with theirs. From what you said, you crossed the street without a walk signal, that right their is worth a citation, so it's reasonable that you ended up with 1 citation. It also sounds ordinary that you'll have ...


8

You are a biker and you hit a pedestrian I've never done that, but in many places you are legally required to stop and render assistance. Also, it's the non-a**hole thing to do. You are a biker and you hit a biker Again, stop, make sure the other person isn't hurt and doesn't have any mechanical trouble that'll stop them from riding. If there is an ...


8

Where I live there is a legal requirement to report any injury accident to the police, and from past experience they would call a bleeding little finger an injury. However, I personally would not bother for such a minor injury, they will fill the report and forget all about it. As far as other legal issues (Again, speaking from my own) - you stopped, ...


8

There are some statistics available from Great Britain for Contributory factors for reported road accidents. Below are the 2014 figures for Pedal Cycles, the first column is number and the second is percent. Note that only reported accidents where a police officer attended the scene are included in the statistics. This Wikipedia article has some details of ...


8

Local laws come into play here, so you would need to study them hard to know where things sit in law. I suspect you are in the wrong. With a bicycle lane, its normal for the cyclist to have right of way over cars. However, that does not make the cyclist legally in the right. In most jurisdictions you could both be held accountable under the law. The ...


7

Virtually every mountain biker with more than a few years under there belt has exactly the same story. In my case, a sideways fall down a bank put me in hospital with a fractured wrist, after putting my arm out to break the fall... - not as bad as some, but still required a bit of titanium scaffolding to fix. The other option I had was a head-plant into a ...


7

I dispute your claim that the collision was entirely the pedestrian's fault. Of course, the pedestrian shouldn't have stepped into the road without looking. However, you, as a road user in a busy city should have been aware that pedestrians often cross the road carelessly. You shouldn't have been travelling so fast and so close to the bus that you had no ...


7

Two possibilities - the wheel itself have shifted, unlikely with a though axle though. The crash does not seem to have be bad enough for a major damage like deformed hub to damaged carbon fork (Carbon is far tougher than many people make out and tends to fail catastrophically). However, if you have concerns over the fork, get it checked by a bike shop. ...


6

The crash made the chain drop from the currently selected front chainring to a smaller one (i.e if you have 3 rings and you where on the middle, it jumped on the 1st - lefmost- smaller one). The crash didn't change any gear on the shifter though, it just made the chain pop to a smaller ring. Maybe not fully, but partially. Afterwards cranking a couple of ...


6

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) collects statistics in the UK. I haven't read the documents in detail (you have to register to download...), but there is a summary page here: http://www.rospa.com/road-safety/advice/pedal-cyclists/facts-figures/ Mechanical failure doesn't seem to be common, it isn't even mentioned in the summary. ...


6

The quick answer is NO, you can't bend back the fork. Or at least not at a reasonable price. Your bike looks right knackered. You could maybe find a used fork off a donor bike for free or cheap at a bike coop - but you might put said fork on and find your frame is bent. I'd say your bike is what we kindly refer to as a said "donor bike." It's brain dead ...


6

I expected the question to be about bent legs/tines on the fork. That is a bent steerer tube on the fork, which means it was one/both of one heck of an impact exacerbating an existing weakness in the fork. Impact Did your front wheel get bent? The one in the photos looks fine, so if that's the one then your fork was weak and took all the force. I'd have ...


6

Note: this answer is not trying to determine or attribute blame for the incident, rather it focuses on why the general public may attribute more blame to “cyclist” than may seem appropriate to the asker. This was the original context of the question. Since then, the thread has evolved into an attempt to apportion blame. Given that all the information ...


5

In addition to the above answers, For most jurisdictions - Don't admit fault (insurance, legal etc). Be careful when / if you say sorry as it can be interpreted as admission of fault. "Sorry we had a prang" is OK, "Sorry, I did not see you" is not. The reason for this is most insurance policies have clauses that won't pay out if you admit fault. You don't ...


5

Stay calm. It is very easy to get heated when something like this happens. Both parties will assume that the other is at fault. Stay cool and be nice. Make sure that you and the other person involved are both OK. Seek medical assistance if there are injuries that warrant that. If there are no injuries, then make sure that any property damage is noted. ...


5

Here's an experiment you can try that we used to do in high school Get an empty coke can with no dents or other disfigurements in it, place it upright on the ground, and stand on top of it. It should be able to bear the weight of most adults with normal body mass. Now put a small dent in the can and try it again. But be careful because the small dent ...


5

The usual disclaimer: none of us are lawyers. It does sound possible that what you were doing doesn't meet the definition for the citation you were given, depending on the details. But you may well have been technically breaking another law; I don't know enough about your local laws (or law in general) to say for sure. So fighting one citation could just ...


5

Since you don't have a big Winter racing programme lined up, you can afford (you have time) to take a low risk approach. So I recommend a gentle test ride of 10 to 20 kms to start with. Avoid jumps, mannies or any other tricks on this ride. Decide what distance you think is good for you, and keep to that decision. Don't go further because you feel good. See ...


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