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14

You seem like you want three different bikes all smashed up into one, and the result is not going to be good. First, the time trial frame is not intended to be a track frame. If you're going to race at the track, use a frame and components that are designed for the track. For starters, the time trial frame will have a lower bottom bracket, dramatically ...


11

The bottom picture is toe clips and associated straps. The top picture shows and derailleur hanger (the hook shaped thing). My best guess on the 2 black rings are headset spacers. The little nut is the only thing I'm not sure about.


11

The sale price falls between what the customer is prepared to pay and cost plus. (If the cost plus is more than what the customer will accept, it's not worth doing business). Complete bikes are a highly competitive market, and this drives the price down to very close to cost plus pricing. It's the high volume, low profit part of the business. The ...


10

The internet. Bike magazines. Bike shops. Your friends. Just as in any other industry there are good and bad brands. Good brands occasionally build awful bikes and vice versa. Read reviews, see the things in person, and test ride them. It's very difficult to buy a frame without a shock. They don't have to be custom made as such, but rather custom tuned. ...


9

4mm at the closest point is about the safe spot. 3mm is about the sane bare minimum you can go to if you want to push things. Less is asking for trouble. Note that frames, cranks, rings, and spindles do vary in how flexy they are and riders vary in habits and strength, so one can only approximate here. If you stacked the movement from a bunch of flexy things ...


9

Warranty - buying one bike from one supplier means the whole thing is under warranty. New bike frames may have anything from one year to lifetime warranty, but often have a rider about "must be assembled by an authorised and qualified bike shop" Integration - all the parts will physically fit into the frame quite well. Stuff like internally routed cabling ...


8

I know you asked for a single part answers but since the parts work together and one choice influences another, I don't really see how that can be accomplished in a useful manner. So I'm going to outline it all. I'll start with the items that you need for any build. Frame and fork. Preferably one with horizontal dropouts - more on that later. Headset to ...


8

There are definitely more sophisticated tools for this but in my mind the essential kit includes (1) the right-sized spoke wrench, (2) a flathead screwdriver, (3) grease for spoke threads, (4) the front dropouts on an upside-down bicycle with brake pads for truing, and (5) lots of patience if you haven't done it before. All of this assumes you have a rim ...


8

The biggest advantage of building your own bike is getting exactly what you want when you knew what you wanted from the git-go. Since you don't know what you want and admit to not really knowing what you're looking at, you're better off getting a built bike from a shop. Your first set of components are basically going to be an experiment. Those components ...


8

Two very different animals. The TT frame is built up with road components, the brake handles and shifters are a bit different but the front/rear derailleurs, crank, etc are all regular road components. The track frame is a single speed frame and many do not have holes to mount brakes...for Planet X you'll have to ask if the fork does or does not have them.....


8

No, Trek will not sell you just the frame if they don't offer it in their product lineup. And a bike shop wouldn't either, given that they have to buy the whole bike anyway. It's just a massive headache to allow things like that for manufacturers. And many manufacturers generally aren't all too keen on letting people sell their bikes online (accessories are ...


8

If you have an idea of what model of frame it is, it would help. Otherwise, your best bet is to take it to a bike shop and try an ISO bottom bracket (gently) to see if it fits, or measure the threads and their orientation to match to this chart. There are also universal threadless BB's like this one from Velo-Orange which skirt the issue by expanding to ...


8

One confusing thing here is that SRAM themselves, that I know of at least, have never made or warranted a 10 speed 11-42 1x setup. So you're not going to hear from them or their product documentation that any SRAM RD will work here. There are two questions. One is capacity, which is the total amount of slack the RD is capable of taking up. Different cage ...


7

To properly true and tension a wheel: Spoke wrench Nipple driver Truing stand Tensiometer Spoke prep or Linseed oil The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brandt You can, of course, jury rig a Truing stand as others have mentioned, and you can build without a way to measure the tension on the spokes. Without a lot of practice and skill, though, your wheels will be ...


7

It is normal and acceptable for a frame to be delivered with paint needing to be removed from the bottom bracket shell, headtube, and seat tube areas. It is assumed that a qualified mechanic with appropriate tools available will be assembling the bike, and that preparation of the frame is simply one of the necessary steps in the build process. Indeed, most ...


6

Given the age of the frame, it's limitations in terms of component choice, and the size of the frame compared to what I would expect a rider of the height described by the OP to ride, I would say building this frame is a waste of money and time. For a rider who is 5'6" tall, a typical frame size is 52cm. This frame is a 58 cm, 3 sizes large. Even if you ...


6

For your purposes, the biggest difference is the rear dropout (where the rear axle connects). The track bike will be much easier to set up as a fixie. I suspect the pricing difference has to do with features like bottle bosses, attachment point for derailer, cable routing stuff, etc, not from the TT frame being "better" in any other way. The TT frame has a ...


6

It may depend on the overall age of the bike but I would guess that in most cases it's better to sell it as a whole. If the bike only consists of rather standard components that one could easily buy at a LBS, then they wouldn't make high prices and the additional work to break it all down and maybe set them all on on ebay separately may not be worth the ...


6

As a general rule, we don't go shopping on bicycles.SE, since that information goes out of date quickly. The first problem with building your own bike is fit. If you don't know what measurements you already need from the frame and stem and handlebars and saddle a priori, its going to be hard to gauge which size is right for you. Your LBS may be able to help ...


6

My short answer is no. A true dirt jump frame is going to be horrible for short XC riding and even worse for extended 2 to 3 hour rides. You won't be able to get the extension to pedal efficiently and will just end up wearing yourself out standing. I have a dirt jump frame and after only a couple short commutes on it (4 miles) I decided it wasn't worth ...


5

All of these questions have answers that are based on very subjective and personal choices. Yes, you should look at buy a frame that fits, if this one doesn't fit. No, I wouldn't build an old frame with new (even new old stock) parts, since the value of the complete build will be far less, generally, than you will spend on the parts to build it, and many ...


5

As long as you're putting on the same size stem (steer tube size, not length), which you should be doing unless it came with spacers/shims, then yeah no problem. If the clamping area is taller, you may need to get a longer bolt to reach the star nut, but then you'll also have some stem above the steer tube and that's no good either. Odds are though that you'...


5

You don't get bulk buying discounts for each part. You have to get retail packaging instead of bulk packaging. Certain parts are only made for OEM bikes. You have to put it together (and possibly get the frame prepped at the bike shop), which can add labor costs (since the work is not done in say, Taiwan).


5

I have built a few bikes for less than already built cost. It takes a lot of time and research to do it. If you add the cost of the personal time, it has to be more a labor of love than a financial gain. It took over a year and hours of looking on line, E Bay, Craigs List and retailers for the best deals on individual components and buying only when I ...


5

Using an 8 or 9 tooth BMX cassette hub will get you into the normal useful range for singlespeed gearing pretty easily with a normal large road ring. 53-9 on a 12" gets you about 70 gear-inches for example, which is a common choice for fixed/singlespeed road bikes. Most present-day freestyle BMX rear hubs would work fine. (Most are 9t, some are 8 - 8s wear ...


5

A lot of people do this, enough that at some points it's been a fashion on fixed gears. All you have to do is put the cable through the normal way with the head resting on the back side of the lever, where it will sit in the housing slot. There are some levers that are made to accommodate the cable head there snugly using a removable plastic bit. The main ...


5

Without any additional knowledge on the bike, my advice would be don't drill into the down tube. You run the risk of making it structurally unsound. That being said, some bikes with downtube shifters have a hole drilled in the downtube with a rod going between the mounts and maybe some epoxy using something like this: Some other options are: Find a ...


5

Unless the frame is unusually valuable, it is almost never "worth it" to buy new major parts, such as a new rear wheel (with cluster, et al). A new rear wheel, once you've got the sprockets and tire on it, will cost in excess of $100, and could run $200-300 if you're determined to find "equivalent" parts. Likewise for a bike missing a fork, a crank ...


5

The rather trivial answer is look at the documentation for various bottom bracket presses and see if a bushing set for the BMX Spanish type is available. For example the Park Tool BBP-1 documentation explicitly specifies that it supports the BMX Spanish type. If the Spanish BB is not listed you need a press that has an bushing set that works with a 19mm ...


5

Friction shifters do not care what kind of derailleur is at the other end and do not care about the number of speeds on your cassette or freewheel; they just pull the cable. So long as the shifter can pull enough cable to move the derailleur the appropriate range, everything is fine between the shifter and derailleur. So there's no compatibility issue with ...


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