20

Issues of where to find a bike have been answered pretty thoroughly here, including the standard disclaimers of making sure a bike isn't stolen before purchasing. On advice for how to see how ride-worthy a bike is: Definitely take a look at the bike before buying. Give it a quick once-over for general wear or use. If the bike looks like it hasn't been ...


20

For the most part, bicycles have terrible resale value, which means that you can usually get a really good deal on a used bike. As for the condition of the components, one can't say without actually seeing them, but quality components should have a much longer life than 1500kms. That said, inspect for obvious signs of wear (there should be almost none), and ...


19

Short version: As many as you can. Slightly longer version: I always include an overall photo from drive-train and non-drive-train side. In addition to that one of the cockpit and close ups of the drivetrain and brakes. That should include most parts of interest. In case of suspension photos of the sliding surface of fork and damper could be of intereset ...


19

Messing with a used bike will teach you a lot (mostly through mistakes, but that's how the process works). There definitely is a huge advantage of having hands on experience figuring out how to adjust brakes, derailleurs etc. The disadvantage of working on an old, cheap bike is that the components will be old designs and standards which does not give you ...


16

Make sure that the frame is not compromised. Looks for cracks or big dents, or any asymmetry in the forks. Make sure that there is no rust through the paint anywhere. If there is any chrome, make sure that any rust is only on the surface. Make sure that the seatpost isn't seized. This is pretty easy as you can just loosen the seatpost bolt and give the ...


15

A (decent) bike from the '90s would not be significantly different† from (a decent) one only a few years old except for a small weight difference and possibly lacking brifters, which are de facto standard on road bikes these days. This statement is of course excepting top-of-the-line superbikes made of carbon fiber and dragon's blood. Check it for stuff ...


14

In bicycles, the technological advance is not as fast as you might think. This is due to the UCI, which blocks a lot of new technologies or is slow to allow them in races. So I think as long as the older bike is in good shape, there won't be much difference. Maybe it's a nine-speed instead of the modern ten or eleven, but that doesn't really make a ...


13

A used bike won’t teach you how to build a bike from the ground up but they are often in need of serious maintenance. On a worn down and beaten bicycle you’ll likely have to replace: Chain (sometimes cassette/freewheel as well) Brake pads Tires Seat Cables Pedals You’ll probably also have to re-grease some bearings, tighten all screws, true the wheels, set ...


10

eBay is a good tool for determining value, search for your item selecting closed auctions and you often get a list of your item, bike in this case that has already sold (or not). The price of those transactions helps me determine relative value. Likewise craigslist shows you another view of what people are asking. If your target bike is being listed for ...


10

It looks to be an older Currie Electro Drive, they were originally made in 1996 i believe. I don't know much to anything else about them though other than that is one and they exist. Here is the companies website which offers support options. I would look for a serieal number and call them with questions about battery replacement. http://www.currietech.com/...


9

You should have at least a good quality drive side picture: Bike perpendicular to the camera view and centered in the shot Well lit Against a plain, light colored background without any thing else in the picture High resolution Depending on the bike, a single good drive side photo can suffice. As @nollak says: including good, well lit close up pictures of ...


7

I have a similar outlook on bike purchasing - something nice enough to ride but cheap enough to afford. First question - do you have a chance of keeping up with an expensive bike assuming equal ability? There are lots of variables - but assuming this won't be an all out race you will do fine on a good quality older bike. Generally extra costs equals ...


6

For sure get a second hand. I've got my Specialized SJ Evo for 2200$ while a new one costs about 5000$, from a guy that works in LBS with a new set of brakes, cassette & chain, and I can't say that I was too much in hunt after it. Just an example for how much more could you get for your money, if you choose a used one. Just be sure to check it very well. ...


6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


6

This is a vintage Montgomery Ward, reverse pedal brake, now I could be wrong on this but the serial number C71967 that is on the rear stays is manufacture date, C=March, 71=1971, 967=where it was made, the actual serial number of this particular bicycle is located on the head tube, where the front fork is inserted, it should start with the letters HC, ...


6

What are your thoughts on the subject? Should I buy a used and disassemble it, or start from scratch? Buy a reasonable condition bike, ride it, and maintain it yourself. After few years, you will know what you like on the bike and what you don't like. Thus, you will be able to select the best components for you for your eventual built-from-scratch bike. Not ...


5

Here's the short list of should haves in mostly descending order: Coil or air sprung fork with rebound adjustment, minimum of 80mm travel. Specs any lower than this aren't actually meant for actual mountain biking. Maybe a little unpaved riding, but not mountain biking. Replacing a fork is expensive. Buy a bike with a fork as described and the subsequent ...


5

If the cones were too tight, the hub would have died a long time ago. Based on what you're describing, the grease is definitely contaminated and most likely the cones are pitted to some degree. Cups tend to be more durable than cones, but there's no guarantee that they won't be pitted too. You'll find out for sure when you disassemble it. A proper overhaul ...


5

That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). These ...


5

You could: measure the chain stretch sight if the chainrings and cogs are worn out check the wear of the tires remove the seatpost and peak inside the frame for rust pull the brakes and inspect closely the cables for rust check the wheels for trueness measure the weight of the bike with an electronic scale rock the handlebars gently to check for drag in the ...


5

Disassembling a lot of bikes is a great way to learn how to use bike tools. This is exactly how I learned to build bikes. The place I learned is a non-profit organization that takes in a lot of used bikes, and send them over to other countries. Every week (before covid-19), this org hosts an event to process donated bikes. Some of them have damaged frame ...


4

For convenience here I've made some assumptions here about the type of bike you're buying, but since you don't say... If I were buying a second-hand bike, I would examine the following as soon as I got it: chain cassette tyres brake pads brake/gear cables (conceivable but unlikely) and if any of these showed sufficient wear I would change them. You can ...


4

Why do you think they aren't recycled? EU legislation is pretty strict on what can go in landfill and it would be very surprising if the bikes fished out of the canals aren't recycled (i.e., melted down and the metal used for something new). 20,000 bikes is going to be at least 200 tons of scrap metal. After being underwater for a while, the bikes are ...


4

I can't give product recommendations as those are off topic here. On a tight budget you should consider buying a complete bike. Building a bike up from components is generally more expensive than buying a complete bike. You can always think about upgrades at a later time to make it more personal. That said, I understand the idea of building up a bike ...


4

I would recommend building up a bike from scratch. Disassembling a super cheap bike isn't going to teach you much as the standards and interfaces used on those are going to be quite different from a multi thousand dollar bike's. A good place to start is all the "dream build" videos on YouTube. You can see much of the process there, albeit with ...


4

To repaint metal, you'll have to strip the current coating. This means you'll have to remove the stickers as well. It is unreasonable to attempt to reuse them, just as it would be silly (or at least ungodly expensive) to try to move a printed image from one T-shirt to another. You can, however, buy and apply new stickers, if you can find the ones you like. ...


3

A reasonable estimate can be found using a site like Bicycle Blue Book. This site is a database of used bike sale transactions going back for almost a decade, and has a number of pretty obscure manufacturers listed. You can even add upgrades you have made from the stock and get an estimate of how that changes the value, though it doesn't account for things ...


3

I believe that half the retail value of the bicycle is a good "rule of thumb" for a bike that is not more than 1-2 years old. A lot of new bikes are sold at great discounts (30% is not unusual) and this pushes the prices of used bikes down. The technology improves each year as well, and new models might be released at even lower price points than the ...


3

Being the owner of a 2004 dirt jumper, and a 2007 full-suspension, I can say it's just fine. However, be prepared to solve problems...creatively. Certain things that are specific to the bike may not be available anymore, but there's usually an after-market part to fill the gap. The main reason not to buy an older mountain bike is the difference in how it's ...


3

Since we live in the advent of the smartphone, you can likely look at the brand and model of a bike and quickly google it. Two sites to look at are Bicycle Blue Book and Bikepedia. This probably helps you avoid having to look at the individual component specs since most of the time if a part is replaced, it is replaced with something at least as good as the ...


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