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14

Wear is normal. Riding on the road damages your tyre too, but you don't see the wear particles gathered in one spot. But additionally, riding on a trainer is harsh on a rear tyre and does cause accelerated wear which is what you're seeing here. It would be common to "use up" any older spare tyres you have around. There are even specialist trainer-...


10

Yes - your rear tyre has failed internally through being run under-inflated, combined with the heat generated on the roller surface. As such that tyre is no longer suitable to ride on the road. Indoor Trainers are hard on rear tyres - at least the ones that use a roller setup to interface resistance with the tyre. There are roller-specific rear tyres ...


10

Yes, lots of small leaks everywhere typically means you just need more sealant. Tires vary quite a bit in how thin/supple versus thick/strong their casings are. Some tires simply take more sealant before they stop leaking through the casing. Usually what you find going along with the symptom you're having is there's also not much free liquid sealant left, ...


10

There are a few things I've found helpful when dealing with stubborn tires: Make sure ALL of the air is out of the inner tube. Squeeze the tire beads together towards the center of the rim, opposite of the part that won't go on. The center channel is deeper, so this will give some room to pull the tire away from the rim slightly. This may be enough to let ...


10

Based on experience with studless tires for cars: These tires look like they're optimized bare asphalt and packed snow. On slick ice they may have better grip than normal bicycle tires but nowhere near studded tires. In soft snow they are likely to be more slippery than tires with knobby tread. I would consider them for conditions where roads are rarely icy ...


9

I am (or was, in the pre-pandemic world) a winter commuter in Canada. The studless winter tires are great for everything except actual ice and much more pleasant on bare pavement. If you need to actually ride on ice (rather than glide over an occasional small patch) you should really get studs. My current commute requires riding in the road through a few ...


9

You could use the linked rim tape with a tubeless ready tyre, but you'd have to use a tube since it's not tubeless tape. Tubeless tape typically has a sticky side and sticks to the rim causing an air tight seal. Schwalbe Tubeless Rim Tape would be the tubeless equivalent of the tape you linked. It's normal for a tubeless ready tyre to be a tighter fit (and ...


8

This happens sometimes and I don't have an explanation for it. It is not a sign that you bought the wrong thing. Sometimes the tube just seems like it has extra diameter, even when it's inflated only enough to give it shape. You want the tube to be in the tire without being folded over or bunched up. Those conditions can create stress risers that lead to ...


4

You're on the right track and are doing everything right, but the valve itself has failed to work. Wind the little acorn nut out some as per 17-seconds. Don't try and force it off though, it won't come off completely. Then push the valve down harder in the same way you have been. The silver threadded ring at 27-seconds is only there to hold the valve stem ...


4

Put the tyre on as much as you can (ie. bead in the rim all the way round as far around as possibly) hopefully leaving you with a small section that seems too small. Now put the wheel on your feet, with the section of tyre that seems too small facing away from you and bend the tyre over the top, towards you, with your hands/fingers gripped over the top and ...


4

It doesn't make much sense to spend a lot of money on tires for what you say is a cheap bike, but you can find slick tires with a width of about 1.5" that are great for urban riding. As long as they have a bead-seat diameter of 559 mm, they will fit. Solid innertubes have notoriously high rolling resistance. I would only choose them for a bike where ...


4

They are only a good choice if you ride on roads and are fairly sure that you won’t encounter smooth ice. Normal road bike tyres (e.g. Conti GP4000s) are surprisingly horrible in winter conditions. Even a thin layer of snow slush on tarmac can make riding dangerous and difficult. Much worse than just wet road. You’d think the tyre would just press through ...


3

You're not correct. Non-existence is always tough to prove, because if can't find the thing you are looking for it could be either because it doesn't exist, you don't recognize it when you see it or just aren't looking hard enough. Fortunately they're easy to prove wrong. I had a look at a tire I had in closet and found this: Why do I think it's the ...


3

A problem occasionally seen with some tire/rim combinations is that the rim has a very narrow trough through the center and unless the rim bead is nestled deeply into that trough the last few inches of bead cannot be stretched over the edge of the rim. This scenario often takes careful planning.


3

It's also the rim being tubeless-compatible that's in question here. The tubeless bead on the tire is part of it, but if you took the same tire and put it on a non-tubeless rim, you could in most cases use any rim strip you want and it won't matter as much or at all. Tubeless tape is very thin. Sometimes if you put a conventional rim strip, which are mostly ...


2

I think the key thing to look for is that the product should explicitly mention tubeless compatibility. It probably doesn't matter if the product is tape or a one-piece rim strip like you linked as long as it's designed to be tubeless compatible. Bontrager has a one-piece rim strip that are designed exclusively for their own rims. Here is a link that's ...


2

I've tried that with Continental Race King and Cross King tires. Rode them for 6 month with tubes and then tried using them tubeless. The sidewalls of these tires were leaking sealant at first and lots of small cuts showed up. It should work and the sealant should close all the cuts that have been in the tire - but in my experience it worked okay for the ...


2

When only the last 20 cm section of the tire remains on the "wrong" outer side of the rim (and on one side only), pushing one end of this section with the lifter into the right position results another end slipping back into wrong one. This looks like a rather pointless activity but it is not so: the tire somehow settles better as the pushed ...


1

There is no need to have the same dimensions. To make it short, the width of a bike tire is mostly dependent on your rim inside width (that you can measure when the tire & tube are removed) and frame clearance. Given you'd like something smaller, it's only the rim inside width that is relevant. It's quite easy to find tables (search for: tire rim chart). ...


1

Winter tires have a different rubber compound which provides greater traction once the temperature falls below 7 degrees. In cold climates, even if the air temperature is above this, the ground will often remain below this. There will provide better traction under 7 degrees than an all seasons compound which will become hard and lose traction when the ground ...


1

Generally studless tires are best in situations where the roads do not have ice and the vehicle does not depend on friction for stability. For example bicycles depend on friction for stability but cars do not. However, in practice you probably won't change your tires every day, so you have to estimate from the climate of the area whether studless or studded ...


1

I reckon they can last 5 years if you are not doing many kilometres, then the fabric becomes old, and is more prone to crack along the sidewall. But for people riding a lot of miles/kilometres then it's distance and tyre wear that finishes them. Tarmac quality is a big variable, but maybe 10,000 km is possible on smooth roads. I should add that to keep tyres ...


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