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11

Those small cuts in the rubber tread are normal and you get them quickly after a few kilometers. I just regularly make sure that no objects are embedded in the tyre since they can dig deeper over time. The important part is that the cuts don’t go through the casing threads. When the casing is cut through the tyre can fail. In your first photo it looks like ...


9

There is a level of judgment call that goes into this question, but there are also two metrics that are most telling in making it: how round the tire looks in profile and how much tread thickness is left in the contact patch when the unmounted tire is pinched between the fingers, relative to the adjacent sections. The view you present, of the tread surface ...


5

Two common alternatives exist to stop the air leaking from the wheel. Use sealant. Use inner tube.


2

When it comes to loss of pressure, the tires shouldn't be the problem unless they have a puncture damaging the tube, in which case it would be more or less a constant loss (not stopping at 80-90 psi) and each time you have a puncture the damage would be different, as well as how the tube reacts. Bicycle model and size of the wheel shouldn't matter. It could ...


2

Without photos or other details, it's a bit hard for us to tell, since the wheels may not be original, etc. Often, your best bet is to find a well-regarded local bike shop and ask them. You may need bicycle repair in the future, perhaps in a hurry, so this is a good opportunity to find a shop you're comfortable with. Searching on the net, I did find an old ...


1

This is to be expected. Bicycles have most of their weight on rear wheel on flat land, so some amount of braking using the rear brake is possible. Braking tends to skew the weight distribution towards front, so a rear brake is never as powerful as a front brake. Thus, most experienced cyclists, if riding on pavement, only use ever the front brake and never ...


1

Presumably you want tubes and tyres for a new-to-you bike, and want them to fit the existing rims. The sidewall of the tyre will have some numbers written there. If Armand is correct, then there will be something like "622-35" or possibly reversed. This is a standard format called ETRTO. The 622 is your rim size, and the 35 would be the tyre's ...


1

I would continue to ride that tyre as pictured. From your photo, the sidewall has a ring of reflective material on each side of the tyre. This is to make the bike more visible in the dark, and they work quite well for this purpose. The black rubber of your tyre is a different mixture to the reflective strip, so the strips must be added as a later part of ...


1

Can someone explain the advantages of using liners or sealant over puncture-resistant tires, specifically relating to resisting punctures? I can see several advantages. Firstly, tires that are puncture resistant enough to get puncture as rarely as a car tire has punctures require so much rubber or other material to resist intrusion of sharp objects that the ...


1

First off and most obvious choice for preventing flats is your first line of defense and that's the tire, plain and simple. Yes I agree that Schwalbe Marathon model line of tires are the best against flats. You didn't say what tire size you use or what you use your bike for. If you use your bike for loaded touring then the best you can get is the Marathon ...


1

A purposeful tire change will not only make your front and rear tires wear more evenly, but also make you safer. Generally speaking, if it is a lightweight tire, it needs to be replaced once for 6000-8000 kilometers. If it is a conventional tire about 10000-12000 km, it needs to be replaced once. If the requirements are more stringent, often participate in ...


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