Hot answers tagged

26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


15

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


14

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


10

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


6

First off, it's untrue that smooth tires are best in the rain. In spite of what Sheldon said, a tire with some tread will provide a better grip on a wet surface. But regardless of that, you can slightly reduce your chance of skidding on a curve by leaning OUT on the turn. Basically, keep your bike as upright as you reasonably can. This isn't as sexy as ...


6

I'm surprised to see that no one else mentioned it, and this isn't a terribly detailed answer, but that road has what motorcyclists refer to as the dreaded "tar snakes". The tar they use to patch cracks ends up very smooth, and depending on weather conditions can get polished even more by traffic. Especially in wet conditions, that thin line of tar can be ...


6

Most likely the 24" 1 3/8" tyres will not fit on you bike with 24" x 1.95" tyres. While the inch diametre is the same, decimal and fractional number usually mean different standards for tyre sizing. Sheldon Brown provides tables with sizes. Here is an excerpt: 24 x 1.5-24 x 2.125 | 507 mm | Juvenile mountain bikes, cruisers 24 x 1 3/8 | (E-5) 540 mm ...


5

Perhaps it could be due to the type of asphalt, I know there is Open-graded friction course (OGFC) (very porous asphalt with a lot of air gaps in it) which is much better at draining the water that falls on its surface, perhaps the asphalt you were riding on was not of this porous type causing more water to accumulate on the surface. However I am quite sure ...


3

Swapping the tires around (or if they have some sort of quick release axles, the wheels) isn’t going to do any harm, and will prolong the useful life of the tire if they are contacting the ground at an angle. How often to do it is hard to tell. Depends on how many miles you ride / week, mass of you plus bike, roads surfaces etc. I’d probable swap tire ...


2

You can use a tire that is narrower than the regular one for use on a trainer. You can even use one that is nominally too narrow for the rim as the tire is not supporting any weight or resisting cornering forces. As along as the tire is not narrower than the outside of the rim it will work. Also, if you can’t find a trainer specific tire you don't have to ...


1

My immediate thought was that you have ISO/ETRTO 630 rims (what used to be known as '27 inch' on older road bikes) which are of course a bit bigger than but sometimes confused with 622 '700c' rims. According to the CR18 page on the Sun Ringle site those rims only come in 622 and smaller. Perhaps 27" versions of these rims were made in the past so you should ...


1

A 622-32 tyre will fit on it no problem at all. I have done exactly the same thing on my bike without issues. The chart you mention is quite old, but according to that, it's a borderline fit, but the current trend lends to wider rims than when the chart was made.


1

If the steerer is threadless then you’re looking for a 1.125 inch or 1-1/8 inch , or 28.6mm straight steerer (all the same thing). You also need to match the wheel axle type e.g 9mm Quick Release (most likely) or 15mm x 100 thru axle (less likely). Lastly you want to match the travel within +/- 20mm. So if your current one is 100mm travel you don’t want to ...


1

if your tires say '26 × 1.79' the you have '26 inch' wheels also know as ISO/ETRTO 599, i.e. the rim diameter is 599mm. the '1.79' is the nominal width of the tire in inches. Mountain bikes all used to have this size wheel until '29 inch' appeared (ISO/ETRTO 622) and then the compromise '27.5 inch' (ISO/ETRTO 584) - hence the options you see on the website....


1

The Schwalbe web site explains that off-road tires can benefit from directional tread designs as driving and braking forces operate in different directions, but the article goes on to say that "in the case of a road tire the rolling direction is mainly important for aesthetic considerations. Tires marked with arrows simply look more dynamic.." However, ...


1

Zap straps/cable ties are useless. Try using bike chain. Deflate tire, put chain around tire and rim. Do the same around tire. Reinflate tire with air, and ride.


1

This image is the current recommendation. Rim ID width +2mm (to allow for shape) Stick on variety. I use 2 laps of masking tape.


1

i have a new bike with the presta valves. So went to buy an adapter for a schraeder valve so i can use my compressor or the pump at the gas station. the adapter does not work and this is the reason and what you need to do to fix it. the adapters are only designed for a bicycle pump not the schreader chuck style at the gas station. the adapter is hollow and ...


1

In nz just push the compressor hose fitting on to the valve real tight and hold it there with pressure then press the button that says flat tyre. Then you gta be fast at taking it off coz it blows up almost instantly


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