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9

Yes, that’s normal. The only other possible cause (apart from wear) would be very wide tires (relative to the rim width) at high pressure which can break the rim walls. It’s actually amazing that rims usually last more than 10Mm (10,000km or 6,200 miles), considering all the abrasive dirt and dust. Sometimes small pebbles or aluminium shards even embed ...


8

Rims can and do wear out, but they take a decent amount of time under normal conditions. Many rims have a wear indicator (e.g. a dot or a groove) to help tell you when they wear for wear due to rim brakes. You can also have failures long term if the rim gets damaged e.g. through hits and what not. You're using friction to wear away not just the rubber in the ...


8

There are many questions here about this topic, but: bicycle tires (mostly) all have both an official ISO designation, which is a pair of numbers "XXX-YY" where XXX is the diameter of the bead and YY is the inflated width. If you look, you'll probably be able to find something like "622-45" somewhere on your tire. Tires all also have at ...


6

I wouldn't hesitate using a tyre in that condition on the trainer, in fact that's exactly the sort of condition i might expect to start using a tyre on the trainer. The small cracks likely mean the rubber is deteriorating and may be less grippy, but that's of little worry. It's very unlikely there is substantial damage to the actual carcass of the tyre. ...


6

The reason non-folding tires are manufactured is that people still buy non-folding tires. Companies will make what sells. In the original post there is a comparison between two tires of the same model, one is folding and one is not. According to the post: folding and non-folding tyres of the same model differ in price more than a few cents. The question ...


5

Another factor is that tires of the same model name often come in many variations. For most manufacturers, the model name simply refers to the tread pattern or even just the general style of the tire (e.g. Panaracer’s Gravel King lineup). Model names are therefore almost always followed by an indecipherable combination of letters, numbers, and Egyptian ...


4

On top of the other answers, your brakes probably locked because the worn rim bulged out. Then they held the rim together until the shop freed them up. Wear from a single large hard object embedded in the brake pad can be concentrated in a single line, and rather fast. This line of damage also concentrates the stress.


4

Cost The cheapest wire-bead BSO tyre I can buy is $14 NZ, and is a MTB format in all the common diameters. example The cheapest folding tyre would have to come from a bike shop, and starts at around $50 NZ. For a direct comparison, their cheapest wire bead MTB tyre is $21-$29. At the low end, wire bead tyres are cheaper. Sturdiness From browsing, it seems ...


4

"whether it's a reasonable goal to try to make your gravel bike 'more road bike-like' with different tires" It is. "and how to achieve it." By mounting a road tyre. That is all there is to it. We can then get into long arguments between the proponents of Continental vs. Schwalbe, vs Challenge vs. Vittoria vs. Tufo vs. whatever... It is ...


4

There's no such thing as a "normal" wheel. There are different rim widths for different purposes. These are probably older mountain-bike wheels. Regarding tire compatibility: a given rim width will be compatible with a range of tire widths. Different manufacturers may have slightly different recommended ranges, but this and this are good starting ...


4

My VidaXL yellow/black soft bag trailer wore the tyres due to parachuting effect caused by the empty compartment and top cover letting wind inside. Also the axle retainers were wrong way round promoting too much toe out, I flipped them over and there is some toe-in, that decrease when pulled along. I now leave top cover off empty trailer so wind doesn't drag ...


3

Adding this additional answer in case someone runs across the same problem as I just did with these Dunlop valves. I'm a complete amateur at bikes and as I was pumping my tire today, I suddenly couldn't manage to get any air in. It felt just as if it will if you hold your finger against the hope in the pump - air flow completely blocked. Okay so I tried ...


3

Honestly you'd be fine with either. I have both - the summer tyres on my randonneuring/touring bike are gator hardshell, and the summer tyres on my commuter hybrid are marathon plus. Within the marathon range, the closest equivalent to the gator hardshell is the marathon supreme. That might be my favourite road tyre except for the price (I've had 32s and 35s)...


3

There are reviews of both tires on bicyclerollingresistance.com: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/tour-reviews/schwalbe-marathon-plus-2015 and https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews/continental-gator-hardshell The Continental Gator Hardshell is considered a road bike tire, albeit a very puncture resistant one. The Schwalbe ...


3

Just by looking at these, my first guess is that that the main difference between the chains and traditional wire ones is that the chain will bounce against the tire and not touch it for the most of the time. It will make a rattling or tingling sound, and add much less rolling resistance than the type that constantly drags against tires. I'm not sure if it ...


3

If you are mainly riding on tarmac roads, then it is perfectly reasonable to mount slick tires. In my experience, slick tires are fine even on dirt roads, e.g. up to grade 2 in the Cyclingtips classification of gravel surfaces (it's an ordinal scale ranging from bad roads at grade 1 to very large rock chunks at grade 4; the latter is described as nearly MTB ...


3

If you want a road tire that actually will result in more speed at the same effort, I found the Continental GP 5000 did that. I do not have a power meter, but rode the same route in a similar manner as in same gears, cadence, and heart rate. I was about 3% faster when it came to average speed for the ride coming from Bontrager R3s. Qualitatively the tires ...


2

We're not into product recommendations; you should peruse cycling websites that list and review such things and see what is available to buy (locally or local shipping) But in general, you'd want a tire with a slick/low profile rolling center band with more knobby sides. Or go with a tire with minimal "texture" (I don't know the exact word).


2

Good job on your first build! It does really just sound like you have low spoke tension. Usually, i tighten the spokes until no threads are visible on any spokes as a starting point. If your spokes are too short (not threaded into the nipple all the way into the rim) the nipples will prematurely break, especially on a mtb. Inflating the tire will squeeze the ...


2

What's the width of the rim? (Measure it.) So long as the trainer tire is roughly the same width as the rim, or wider, you'll be just fine. You don't have to worry about hitting the rim or pinch flats as you do outside.


1

You just discovered that rims wear out from braking. To reduce this effect in the future, you can choose high quality brake pads that don't embed grit into them. The Kool Stop salmon colored ones have a different compound with iron oxide embedded in (that's where the slightly "rusty" salmon color comes from). A word of warning, though: the Kool ...


1

Another way to phrase this agnostic of endorsing a brand/specific tire: If a tire with width 38mm currently works well with my wheel, would it be better to find a trainer tire with a similar width (e.g. 32+ mm) or does the width not matter enough here to make an impact? That's a pretty wide rim. A 23 or 25 might work, but you won't know for sure until you'...


1

Some quick numbers: Steel wire rod seems to run around $500-$800/tonne, or $0.50-$0.80/kg: https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/wire-rod.html 1500 denier aramid (Kevlar is a brand name; aramid is the class of materials) seems to run around $25/kg https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/1000d-1500d-para-aramid-yarn.html A cheap road tyre is 365g in steel, 280g in ...


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