20

While my initial attempt with lightly deflated tires was not a success (I could only bike 100 m before being exhausted) my second attempt went much better. Based on your helpful answers, comments and suggestions I deflated my rear tire to 1.5 bar, and my front tire to 2 bar and rode at the waterline without much problems at an average speed of 20 km/h. I was ...


11

If you're going to change anything before the big event, change it now and allow time for any problems to arise, then be sorted out before the event. Generally, a 28mm tyre is said to give lower rolling resistance over a 25mm and has been tested, though using a 28mm at the same pressure as the 25mm could spoil some of the comfort advantages. The numbers ...


9

I talked to Canyon's support and they have clarified that apparently it's an error.


8

Yes on hard sand it should be fine. The problem is what if it is not hard or there are patches of dust. At that point it will be a bit more tricky. The good part is you are on a bike and on sand. So if you fall it is not a big deal, and if you find yourself getting stuck you can walk sections. You may consider lowering your tire pressure too as that works ...


5

I haven’t seen the beach, or tried to cycle on one. I have at least cycled through numerous sandpits, a common obstacle in cyclocross races (and traditional CX tires are 32-34mm wide). I would guess that you mean the sand is somewhat compacted. You could certainly try it, but I would guess that the sand may not be compacted enough, and your tires might dig ...


4

A slightly narrower tire should be fine in terms of fit on the rim. Check the manufacturer's specifications for compatible rim sizes to be sure. You will lose some volume and impact absorption of course. A narrower tire will have a narrower contact patch so you many find that this decreases grip.


3

It could allow for slightly better aerodynamics and a slightly lighter frame. It allows for a shorter wheel base and you don’t have to worry about toe strikes (toe overlap) too much. It also looks better. I can’t think of any other advantages. It’s obviously possible to build frames with huge tire clearance without running into great trouble, so it stands to ...


3

It will be on the squirrely and unstable side, especially if ridden aggressively, but this combination was common when narrow MTB rims were more fashionable and ubiquitous, so it will in all likelihood function without major incident. You can do it but probably shouldn't.


3

Beach races are quite standard, but there's a difference between soft and hard. There is nothing very complicated about bringing a vehicle over sand, and no strict cut-off point. However this is a very pure beach racing bike https://www.koga.com/en/bikes/race/collection-2018/beachracer.htm It's a 10kg racing/CX bike with discs and Schwalbe 62mm (2.35") ...


3

In bicycle tires the height and width are directly related. This is because unlike unlike car and motorcycle tires, the cords that hold the tire together are aligned diagonal and the resulting fabric stretches to round shape when inflated. The tube does not have anything to do with it, because it expands to fill all available space. If you have a piece of ...


3

Choosing a maximum size for a given frame is not an exact science. It's done by either mounting or approximating the widest size tires you want to be able to run and then using a caliper or ruler to see what you've got to work with in terms of vertical and side to side clearance. Your bike looks like it shouldn't have trouble with the 45mm. That's probably ...


3

23 to 25 is pretty minimal - you might not feel much of a difference. I'd look at the chainstay and seatstay gap, and then the brake bridge to see how much space you have, and then go for the largest tyre that will fit without causing frame rub. Different tyre brands have subtly different sizings, and they vary across rim widths too. Also remember frames ...


3

The two things to consider when increasing tire size are compatibility with the rim width and frame/fork clearance. Inner tubes fit a range of tire sizes. 15mm rims will easily take 23 or 25mm tires. Check that your frame has sufficient clearance for an extra mm or two on either side (some tires are a bit wider than specified width) at the brake calipers, ...


3

Per the technical specifications page for your bicycle: MAXIMUM TYRE DIMENSION (ETRTO) 70 mm 70 mm is 2.75 inches, so a 2.60 tyre should fit. Tyre sizes are notoriously imprecise, but a 2.60 should be significantly smaller than a 2.75. You can be as certain as you can be that it will fit, especially as you're sticking with not only the same ...


3

After listening to advice from @Carel, I warmed the tyres up for 20 minutes, a lot more than I would have envisaged, and I finally got consistent results being able to calibrate more than once. After a bit of slackening, I managed to calibrate to the centre of the green zone. I can't wait to re-do the whole process after my training tyre arrives! A quick ...


3

You should be able to fit it as the tire width is wider then the rim width BUT you should check if the tire will fit in your frame.


2

I am reasonably assured the larger tire will fit. As has been stated here before, bicycle tire width sizes aren't an exact standard. Maker A's tire size 2.0 inch may in fact be larger than Maker B's 2.1. The best information comes from user reviews about a specific model. Just to be sure look at your current tire. Does it barely fit between the frame stays? ...


2

All you need to know the wheel rim diameter, tire width, valve type and valve length. Google translate to English of what's written on you tire is: Tire front Brand: Kenda Type: K-193 Size: 28 inches Tire width: 28 mm 28 inches refers to the wheel diameter. This means a rim with a rim tire bead seat diameter of 622mm, also known as 700c (and 29 inches ...


2

Generally you want your guard to be wider than your tyre, to catch water that gets slung at an angle. The problem is finding if the guards will fit between your seat stays, under your rim brakes (if you have them) and still stand off your tyre's tread, while leaving enough room for stones/grit/mud to pass through. A wider guard will keep you drier, but ...


2

After looking at your pictures, reading the description of the roads you ride on and looking at the comments here are my suggestions: Riding Style Change your riding style based on the surface you are riding on. For normal cycling on surfaces with good traction a rider will lean into a turn. When the surface you are riding on is less than optimal you need ...


2

Visualize the extremes, i.e. a rim that was "obviously" too narrow for a 2.1". Say 10mm internal. As you get narrower, the handling gets floppier, particularly in aggressive riding. The lie of the contemporary charts is they make this effect look binary where in fact it is progressive. Mountain bikes started out with fairly rational rim to ...


2

20x2.175 may be some arbitrary numbers on a rim, but it isn't a size or measurement. Reasonable widths for a 2.4 start at around 23mm inner width or 28mm outer. This includes what most would consider all real street/dirt/park rims. Plenty of frames and forks in the world won't take a 2.4. Most of the time it's fairly straightforward to predict that based on ...


2

There are loads of 2.1" MTB tyres, and a few 2.0. I've got some WTB nano 2.1s that were on my hardtail when I got it, and I've got a Rapid Rob 2.1 on it now. But your current tyres look pretty slick. Putting a dirt touring tyre like a marathon mondial on there would certainly help (and that comes in 35, 40, and 50mm widths). Those are OK on road, though ...


1

If you have a fork/frame with tyre clearance of 30mm and install a 28mm tire, there's only 2mm of space between the tire and the fork/frame. A bit of mud on the top of the tire can easily cause the tire to scrape away the surface of your fork/frame. Thus, you can't ride on anything except clean pavement with your low-clearance frame. Besides, a 28mm slick ...


1

Performance of tires on sand mostly depends on tire pressure: The pressure in the tire is almost the same as the pressure that your tire applies to the sand. 32 millimeter tires are generally ridden with pressures around 5 to 6 bar, and that's likely too much for wet sand. Sand may be much stronger when its wet, but 6 kilograms per square centimeter are ...


1

If your inner tubes are 18-23mm, then by all means go for new tubes. However, current smallest tubes from both Conti and Schwalbe are 18-25 compatible, so you should probably be fine.


1

If you don't have a specific reason to change size, get the same. This kind of combination is common, but over the last years there has been some fuss about too narrow rims, in some part because people with limited riding experience like to repeat what they have heard and in part because manufacturers are pushing wider rims.


1

622 is the "official" ISO actual diameter of the rim, which is commonly called a 700c for road bikes, 29" for moutain bikes. Ask for a 29er tube as big as you can get it. e.g. 29x2 29x2.5 Because 29ers are mountain bikes, they have bigger tubes. If you get a 700cx40 tube, it will be much smaller, and in my experience, fail prematurely. As a matter of ...


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