Hot answers tagged

63

The problem is ambiguity. Sometimes you'll be unfairly judged by cyclists you're trying to pass. It will happen. Sometimes it helps to reduce the sting of the judgement with some perspective on what's going on. When you’re on a bicycle, cars are death monsters. You spend your time trying to keep distance from them. You wish they would all just disappear. ...


61

As long as you give a cyclist plenty of space, and obey traffic laws and drive safely in general you are OK. 1 meter or 3 feet is generally considered enough space when passing, but I know I prefer more. If you can move into another travel lane to overtake please do that. Don't follow a cyclist too closely before overtaking, it's really scary for the ...


40

As an experienced cyclist who has been all over the country and even done hundreds of miles on interstates, after finding that location on Google Maps, and checking how you might conceivably get there, there is absolutely no way in hell I would ever be caught dead there on a bicycle. How you answer this question is not by taking one isolated photo out of ...


26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


26

I ride successfully along some roads with a posted speed of 100 km/h (65 mph) and there are other roads posted at 50 km/h (35 mph) that I avoid. The difference is in the shoulder and general condition of the shoulder. In your photo there IS a paved shoulder, compared to some of my roads where the seal stops at the white painted line. However there's nowhere ...


25

Determining an acceptable risk level is really a subjective personal assessment, no one can tell you whether or not something is of an acceptable level of risk. As such I will give you my judgement criteria for riding on roads shared with automobiles. I avoid roads without a large shoulder or bike lane. While many still advocate for taking a lane, the ...


25

@Rider_X has already given a good answer. I would add an important consideration: local driver and cyclist cultures. As you and the map you cite indicate, there is little pro-cycling culture in this area. If you don't see other cyclists riding there, then don't do it yourself. The road you picture is quite poorly designed, even for motor traffic. That ...


25

IMHO, it's not the weight that is hurting you the most. While weight makes a difference and a lighter bike would be much better, it's too common in cycling world for people to use weight as a proxy quality and performance. Any twit with scales can measure it. That said, there is no doubt more suitable bike would make longer trips faster, and a better ...


17

My personal list in order of importance: Overtake when it’s safe to do so. This means no oncoming traffic (unless the lanes are wide enough to overtake even despite traffic) and that you can see far enough ahead. Don’t overtake on crossroads or crosswalks. Don’t drive too close behind. Bicycles usually don’t have braking lights, so you’ll need some time/...


17

This would be fine: There's a shoulder, you can ride on it (if it's legal) and speed limit is pretty low. Not the most pleasant place to ride, but it's okay. However I would advise against it, because the part where you get run over by a bus is not shown in the picture. You say you're "thinking about bike commuting" which hints you're not used to ...


16

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


16

It may be worth glancing at this more detailed answer that discussed how aluminum rims were constructed. But in brief, aluminum rims are first extruded in a flat bar, then they’re cut and rolled into hoops, then the ends of each hoop are joined somehow. One method is to simply pin the ends together without smoothing out the joint. Your rim was built this way,...


15

Your rims can almost certainly take the extra width. The real question is can your frame, forks, and brakes? Only you can measure that. Based on nominal dimensions (and some approximations) you would need an extra: 2.5mm either side to the chainstays/seatstays and forks/brake arches. 5mm above (to clear the brakes) and in front of the back tyre. A few ...


14

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


13

I understand that around 20% of the energy while cycling is lost by the deformation of the [tires] No not really. Rolling resistance will increase linearly with velocity while drag increases with the cube of velocity, so rolling resistance is not a fixed percentage of total power lost. At higher velocity drag will completely dominate. use plain tires (no ...


12

Are you still looking for stage maps? I have the Tour DuPont program books from 1993, 1995 & 1996. They include a map and a profile of each stage. Also have Lance Armstrong's signature in the 1995 book. edit - Here's a first snap of the overall maps for the three years. Apologies for the quality - I've just snapped them with a phone in the meantime,...


12

You handled the situation perfectly. Congrats, you belong to the good, vanishingly small minority who does. You see, from my experience I would estimate the fraction of car drivers who obey the rules when overtaking bikes at about a single percent. At most. The vast majority of motorists seem to think that they have the right to overtake a bike even when ...


12

I would recommend you wait for one reason Covid. In most parts of the world bikes are in limited supply. Prices even on used bikes are 50% to 75% higher than comparable bikes a year ago. I think you may wind up overpaying and settling. By settling I mean selecting a bike because it is available. Maybe not the best fit, or the correct type(road, gravel, ...


11

If you're going to change anything before the big event, change it now and allow time for any problems to arise, then be sorted out before the event. Generally, a 28mm tyre is said to give lower rolling resistance over a 25mm and has been tested, though using a 28mm at the same pressure as the 25mm could spoil some of the comfort advantages. The numbers ...


11

There are two sorts of brake lever that would suit this description - given mention an older ten speed you're probably remembering these: Sometimes called Suicide Brakes, or secondary levers/safety levers or something similar. They're not common any more because the braking effect is low, probably for mechanical advantage reasons. Not recommended unless ...


11

It's difficult to tell from this picture, but it looks like the casing—the structural part of the tire—has been damaged, so it's just a matter of time before the tire fails completely. Look at the inside of the tire. If the damage has penetrated all the way through, I would stop riding on that tire. If it hasn't, you might be able to get away with gluing in ...


11

Yes. Absolutely. Simply install an internal gear hub. Prices for internal gear hubs are basically what you want to spend: You can buy decent second hand IGHs (SRAM 7 speed, 300% gear spread, super reliable) for as low as 25 Euros, or you can invest roughly a thousand euros into a new top-of-the-list IGH (Rohloff, 14 gears, 500% gear spread, super reliable, ...


11

For Oahu specifically, Hawaii Department of Transportation publishes the "Bike Map Oahu" which outlines bicycle routes around the island. They classify the routes into "Novice friendly", "Experienced", and "Not Bicycle Friendly". I see that there is a "Nimitz Bike Path" that runs parallel to the Nimitz ...


10

This is not a proper answer. Its more a collection of notes gleaned from different sources. Feel free to add more if you find other things. 1989 The first Tour de Trump, a 10-day, 837-mile bicycle race through five Eastern states http://www.nytimes.com/1989/05/15/sports/dispute-mars-end-of-the-tour-de-trump.html Other site says 825 miles total, or 782 ...


10

You basically get what you pay for, so there isn't any secret formula. Trek is one of the largest manufacturers on the planet, and is probably as good as any other on the market. But have a look at, and test if possible, other bikes as well as Trek, because different models have different geometries, and another geometry might feel better to you. Size also ...


10

What metrics can I use to make a judgement call about whether a vehicle's actions are actually making me unsafe The UK Highway code says they should give you as much space as they give a car, illustrations in the code suggest they should move completely into the next lane. At least one UK police force uses 1.5 metres as the minimum separation. My old copy ...


10

If you want to improve balance and control out of the saddle at any speed, even freewheeling, you just have to practice doing it. Note that balance while pedaling out of the saddle on a trainer vs. on the road will be very different as the bike is held firmly upright in the trainer With respect to power output: pedaling out of the saddle is usually done ...


10

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


9

Its to control the size of the field. The number of categories grows as the number of riders increases. This is so that you split people by ability more (for better consistency) and keep the fields sufficiently small. There just happen to be more men than women. If the number of women increase to be unwieldly with 4 categories, they'll presumably add a cat ...


9

An RD-5701 rear derailleur should work just fine as a replacement for an RD-6600. I've used an RD-5701 with an 11/28 cassette for the last 6-7 months with no issues, including swapping my crankset from a 50/34 compact to a 53/39 a few weeks ago.


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