Hot answers tagged

40

If it's actually used, as in previously owned with real mileage, they should have disclosed that. If it's in new condition, or new condition with some amount of the discount being for shop wear or due to being a low-mileage return, then I would say there's nothing disingenuous about omitting the manufacture date unless asked directly. For better or for ...


14

Despite what others have said, a warranty is a bona fide contract between the company and you. It's used in the selling of the product thus is covered by decent consumer protection law (in the UK anyway). This article from Which suggests a good process to follow. Keep a record of the contact with the company, try to follow their warranty procedure. If you'...


11

I'm trying to put myself into your shoes if this were to happen to me with the LBS that I frequent. I own two bikes, which almost sounds like the start of an inverse Twelve Step Program--one that increases one's bike purchases. My Kona Dew is a 2007 that I bought in mid 2008. That was a different LBS from the one I frequent now. Nothing wrong with the ...


11

You don't need such a repair service. There is a different, more practical solution: a loan bike. In The Netherlands, most bicycles are used by commuters, so expediting wouldn't work. However, there are also many places that rent bicycles. A good bike shop can simply have a couple of dozen bicycles on hand that they then loan out to a (regular) customer, ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


10

Spending $30 / month at your LBS seems perfectly reasonable. Your LBS is grateful you buy from them instead of from Amazon. If you sometimes go to your bike store just to talk, that probably OK, as long as you are not distracting any staff from real work or keeping them from serving customers who are paying. Either they actually like chatting with you or ...


9

First thing always is to take it back to that LBS and talk to the manager or owner. At the very least that way you know that they know you're unhappy. Probably they will offer to fix the problem for you (or get one of their mechanics to do it). From working in a bike shop we always took those return/re-repair jobs quite seriously, because one angry ex-...


8

I think this working is highly dependent on where you live, and I don't think it would work in most places. You need enough people in the market who would use this service (which probably don't exist in most places). And people need to be willing to pay the premium you need to sustain to have this type of business. Bike shops aren't exactly very profitable ...


7

I would definetly negotiate for a lower price. In these hard times it should be expected. That does not mean you are a "weasel" or a "thief"...Are you kidding me? Pay top dollar if you choose (car dealers must love you). A company needs to earn my business. That said I do my research as others have mentioned above. Whilst shopping for a bike I would ...


7

1) "am I freeloading, or am I a (financially) valued customer?" Depends. Most bike shops I've been to are happy with giving some of advice -- helping the person find the right part and them do it themselves, since thats how a lot of bike upkeep is done. Of course, doing this too much can annoy people and also choice of timing -- if the shop is just sitting ...


5

I had the same problem with my current MTB - I talked to the guy at my favorite LBS (I have a number of specialist but large chain bike shops close by, hes a small operator), and told him what I wanted (He stocked the brand, not the model, and it was end of season so stocks were short supply). I had seen it on the internet for a significant discount, told ...


5

Absolutely. If they actually put anything but a French headset on a French fork, it should be 100% on them. Hopefully they will fess up and cover the whole thing. Just to be clear, measuring the difference between a French fork and the more common ISO/British is super easy. The OD of a French steerer is 25mm, and common 1" is 25.4. The thread pitch is also ...


5

I'd highly recommend two courses of action. First, take a couple deep breaths and then call back the manufacturer. Without too many details to cloud the issue, and without too much emotion, explain that you believe you have a frame crack that in your estimation is from a defective weld. Play nice, if they still refuse to warranty it, ask what they can/...


4

Earlier this week my day was thoroughly disrupted by the stem valve in my rear tire tearing out of the tube. (It's a belt-drive bike with disc brakes, so the rear tire assemblage is more complex than I'm quite comfortable fixing myself.) I'd have called such a business in a shot. Ditto if that back tire ever goes while I'm in the middle of nowhere on a ...


4

I concur with PeteH's answer, with the caveat that local bike cultures, and certainly individual bike shops, can sometimes skew heavily in the direction of a specific kind of riding or a specific kind of rider... who may not be you. So it's completely fine to walk out of a local bike shop that treats you like something you'd scrape off the bottom of your ...


4

It may be helpful to know that according to the NBDA*, most bike shops actually lose money on bike sales. The average profit margin is -3%. Where the profit margin on parts and accessories is +7.5%. Although the report doesn't share the profit margin for service, my rough calculations say it is about 4.5%. So, I agree with @Argenti Apparatus. Hope ...


3

http://www.bicycletrainingaustralia.com.au/ is supported by the City of Melbourne. They provide Advanced Bicycle Mechanic Training. In the UK, Cytech are the most recognised body; Contact them and ask if they're aware of an equivalent organisation in Australia.


3

Silence... I've found this works in most negotiations. Ask a direct but open question like "what's the deal with discounts on this bike" and then just wait until the other person fills the silence. Even when it feels like they've finished talking, if they haven't really answered your question stay quiet and don't make confirming sounds. They will almost ...


2

Some things to do. If any get you a discount, all good but don't expect it This is based around servicing, rather than buying. Clean your bike. Noone likes getting messy working on a bike, and turning up fresh from the paddocks will it take that much longer. Mechanics will charge mechanics rates for removing dirt and oil, which is something you can do ...


2

You don't owe the bike shop your business. What I feel is not right is to use the bike shop for sizing or advice then go and buy it online to save a few dollars. Consider the bike shop is the final point of assembly. If the bike shop will order it for you then you basically get a free tune up. Give the bike shop a chance to quote a number and if you can ...


2

These crancks are still very common on Dutch vintage bicycles. You can order them from many Dutch websites starting at about 6 euro's. All Dutch bicycle shops can order such a cranck at every wholesaler. Many even have such a cranck on stock. You may want to look for a Dutch website which is willing send it to the UK before you replace everything. This ...


2

It's hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like a cottered crank. I don't think anybody makes them anymore, but not all hope is lost. You can likely replace the entire crankset and bottom bracket assuming the bike has a bottom bracket which is still available, which is somewhat likely. It may cost more than you are willing to spend on the old bike ...


2

I'll tackle the question of where you can learn. Do an online seach and find out if you have a bike co-op nearby. Most decently sized US cities have them. They're a great resource where you can just show up one day per week and learn everything there is to know about bikes (and meet some cool people while you're at it). Specifically for you: http://www....


2

Most bikes come flat shipped from the manufacturer. A good bike shop will do the following: Check/adjust the wheels/hubs and then install them. Install and lubricate/paste the seatpost. Install the handlebars. Check/Adjust the headset. Check and adjust the drivetrain. Install pedals (if the bike came with them, many high end bikes do not). Install the ...


2

This is determined by your LBS, the relationship you have with them and the bike your buying. Generally bikes come in flat pack boxes and, with the exception of top end bikes, are partially assembled out of the factory. The reseller needs to attach the handle bar and do a safety check. If you want to change parts out you'll have to pay workshop rates. ...


2

There is velotooler.com** They are all over the US, but also have a presence in Canada. They will be expanding to the UK and Europe in 2017, but they have already started their mechanic recruiting process (they even have mechanics that have registered in Australia and Latin America). Velotooler.com is an on-demand platform of bicycle mechanics. You list ...


2

It is interesting that "new" is used as an antonym of "used"; logically speaking, "used", "old", and "pre-owned" are all distinct concepts that have been conflated for simplicity, and only some of the concerns that come with an old bike are due to it being used. If the 2012 model uses different parts, then it will likely be more difficult to find ...


1

The thing that would give me pause about this would be if there were a generational shift in technology during the intervening years, and it might be harder to get replacement parts (like the transition from 26" to 27.5" in mountain-bike tires). This would leave me with a new-but-obsolete setup, which is not something I would generally choose. OTOH, you as ...


1

Nothing. If the manufacturer doesn't want to play ball, you're scuppered. There is no way you can prove your case one way or the other, so you're reliant on the goodwill of the manufacturer. In this case they appear to have no goodwill. Unfortunately your case shows that for the most part, warranties should be treated with a pinch of salt. Not much ...


1

In Germany, there's the "Zweiradmechaniker", which is taught like any other craft, i.e. you learn it from an existing mechanic. You don't need to have this education to open a bike store though.


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