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3

In addition to the answers you already have, it sounds perfectly possible that the bike was stolen in the past, even if the person currently selling it is unaware and bought it in good faith. You might want to check if your country operates anything like the UK's immobilise or smart water, both are schemes aimed at tracking and tracing stolen property. I ...


1

Thanks to the answer from @Armand, it looks a lot like the paint scheme of the models 2009/2010. Maybe the seller bought it from a shop, the shop genuinely sold it as a 2017 model, who knows. Anyway, I would suggest you to stay away from buying such a bike unless provided with a receipt of the original transaction or a signed and verified agreement from the ...


5

I would say they (both posts) are most likely either being intentionally misleading or they don't actually know what kind of bike they have. Looking at their the 2016 Defy 1, it seems to be disk only, and be specced with 105 level components. Even going back to 2013 which is as far back as Giant's site seems to go back, it's still speced with 105 level ...


5

The paint scheme looks like that of the 2009 Giant Defy Advanced 1 Check out https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/value-guide/product/3050124/ bikepedia.com and bicylebluebook.com have lots of info on bikes by year and model. Here's the 2010 Giant Defy 1, which again looks very similar, with a few minor differences in the paint scheme: https://www.bicyclebluebook....


2

I'm by no means a "pro" or even that prolific on my bike any longer, but, if you're changing tyres and tubes, check into the puncture resistance of your tyres - I found the properly resistant ones to be almost miraculous compared to "standard puncture resistance" (and my goodness, non-resistant tyres will get punctures if you look at them ...


1

There are a number of solutions cyclists use to manage punctures: "Patch whenever needed" This is for the vast majority of conditions the optimal strategy. The strategy is based on the observation that punctures, although possible, are relatively rare. A cyclist can ride several thousand kilometers without getting a puncture. If the tires are ...


8

I put the Tannus Tire Liners in with my tubes. They are very lightweight, but do not compress easily, so if there is a puncture, you can still ride on them to get back: I'll report back on their true performance, if I ever get a flat, but I put these in my tubeless tires & rims (swapped out the stems) because they provide greater puncture protection, ...


7

I've never tried an anti puncture lining, so can't comment on those. But my experience with slime tubes is that you still get a puncture and now also have the added hassle of slime all over everything. The correct solution to this problem is to use proper tubeless tyres and sealant, however even though this is now a well established technology for MTB, may ...


8

If you have a lot of thorns around, slime is probably not going to save you. Perhaps tubeless tyres mounted in a tubeless setup could, but they are more complicated and potentially incompatible with your old rims. Tubeless also uses something like slime (most often a latex-based sealant) but it all works much better, because there is more solid rubber in a ...


7

There is one other possibility that bears mentioning: If the hub is somehow deformed, such that the bearing cups are not "square" to the axle, then the rotation of the hub can tend to "grab" the cones and turn them on the axle. This can increasingly tighten the cone and increase the tension on the axle, causing it to snap. I had a front ...


14

You almost certainly have a 7 or 8 speed freewheel hub. They can do this, especially 8. Google those terms along with broken axles. 8 speed freewheel hubs had some years of prominence circa 2000-2001 and then were rejected by the industry because of these problems. They have now made a return due to manufacturers answering the pressure to fit so many other ...


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