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19

First, don't worry about the bike - worry about you. If you need a different bicycle, you'll figure that out pretty fast while you're training to do your 200-mile ride. What's the farthest you've ridden on that bike? 30 miles? Even 50 or 60 miles is only just getting to the edges of what riding 100 miles is like. Fatigue is cumulative - never mind just ...


8

How far have you ridden in a day? The bike will be fine, as the comments say the question is whether you will be. A road bike is more efficient and will get you there easier, but there are many people who could do the ride on a hybrid or worse. Are you one of them? Decades ago when I was in college I rode a century on a basic bike with a Sturmey-Archer 3 ...


7

This is a 1996 Giant Sedona. I had this exact bike, right down to the color. The frame is 4130 cro mo and the tubes are 'triple butted'. If you notice the top tube and down tube are flared at the joints. The was the 'external butting' and they were also butted for tube wall thickness internally. The groupset was entirely shimano STX, which, at the price ...


7

Stability of load will likely be quite different between the Tubus and giant racks. For the Tubus racks the Tara had a cross brace to help stabilize the load. The Tubus duo does not, but if you look carefully it mounts to both the inside and the outside of the mid fork eyelets, while the Tara mounts only to the outside. This adds stability lost by not ...


7

Well, 26 will feel a whole lot better than your current 23. You can get away with lower air pressure because of the larger volume supporting your weight. Lower pressure means smoother ride. Of course two tires of the same size can feel very different because of the quality of the casing and rubber. For commuting, I would say get as big as you can fit, which ...


7

You should ask the seller for all the information you need about the bike, because a) they should know more than we do and b) if they can't give it to you readily then there is more risk that it is stolen. These things do happen! Don't tell the seller this, but the name is usually written on the frame. If they can't manage that much then consider walking ...


6

A good investment for someone new to cycling who starts with such a sporty bike is to get a good bike fit. Based on the findings of the fit a part that maybe has to be replaced, is the stem. As these come at different lengths but are not adjustable. You need to get pedals as well. You may choose between flat pedals, clip-less road pedals and clip-less ...


5

It wears fast because there are fewer teeth in contact with the chain, but that might not be the cause. Here are some other possibilities: A stiff chain link is most noticeable with a small sprocket. It's also more annoying if not more noticeable when under load. This tends to cause an even rhythm under steady pedalling, about one every 3 pedal strokes ...


5

It looks like a 2017 Giant Contend SL2 Disc: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/gb/contend-sl-2-disc-2017. The picture is quite grainy so it's hard to be 100% sure. Check if it has the Giant Conduct disc brake system to be sure. Here's the image in the linked product page for the 2017 Giant Contend SL2 Disc:


4

It has a regular old quick release. The bike is way too low end to have a thru axle. You can see from pictures of the bike that it has dropouts in the fork and rear triangle, so the wheels are inserted in vertically. A thru axle does not have dropouts -- the axle has to go through the fork/frame. The wheel cannot be pulled vertically out from the frame.


4

The answers are mostly opinion based but here goes ... I'd leave the bike alone to start with. After you get an decent amount of miles on it a you may find you want a different length stem, different handlebar or seat etc. To optimize your riding experience I'd invest in good, well fitting shoes and pedals, good clothing, helmet, water bottles, a multitool ...


4

This is a Giant Lafree e-trans e-bike. They were made in three versions from 1999 on and yours is the Sport model. It has two SLA batteries totalling 24 volts in the case. The roadster version I knew had the charger integrated in the bike so your's probably has too.


4

You can get racks, what you get will largely depend on the load. The two styles that work are a seat post mount rack or once that clamps to the seat stay. Seatposts often have a low load limit, and can be prone to swinging around, but are generally very popular. Using on on a carbon frame would have to be done with caution - ensure a long seat post insertion....


4

The specs of the thru-axle that you need are here. The one that you need is T1707, which is 12×142 with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 and the T1711 both fit a 142×12 mm with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 has an axle length of 162.5 mm, while the T1711 has an axle length of 175 mm. I couldn't find the TCR specs for this online, but since I ride a Giant Propel ...


4

Check if all spokes are properly tightened. if some spokes are too loose that can put extra stress on the rest of the spokes which can cause premature failure. If so (some of the spokes are not properly tensioned) you should true the wheel (or have it done if you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself). Is the back wheel the original back wheel that came ...


4

I think you are confused about the frame 'technologies' that Giant offers. More boxes checked does not mean a better frame, the choices are mutually exclusive. 'Advanced Composite' means a carbon fiber composite (CFC) frame. 'ALUXX' means an aluminium alloy frame. CFC frames are generally held to be superior to alloy ones. I'll give you that the 'SL' and ...


3

The Cypress is a comfort oriented bike that has a deliberate high handlebar position and upright riding posture. Almost all other bicycle types will have a much lower handlebar position. If you look at the Cypress on the Giant website, you can see the bars are above the level of the seat. On the Roam and Cross City they are about level. General handlebar ...


3

Looks like a comparatively old ebike. Start by pulling the battery and check its chemistry and state of charge. Googling suggests Sealed Lead Acid or possibly Nickel Metal-Hydride. Give the bike parts a bike safety check, and probably replace the brake pads just because ebikes are heavy. There are plenty of google results out there for "lafree electric ...


3

All frames flex to some extent due to impacts or road shocks or vibrations. Some frames are better at absorbing this than others. All frame designers engineer their frames to attenuate these imperfections in riding conditions appropriately (for control/comfort reasons) by varying the size/shape of tubes and their compositions SAVE is Cannondale's marketing ...


3

If utility is more important that looks, a stem riser will get you a long way (well 50 - 80 mm, about 2 to 3 inches). There are various makers, but they all look more or less like this one. Prices run from about US $15 to $30. The riser and the existing spacers take care of the holding the headset, you don't need spacers under the stem with the riser – just ...


3

Your standard cartridge and "loose bearing" bottom brackets have two threaded "cups". Usually the right (drive) side cup has a lip on it, so it will only screw so far into the bottom bracket housing. There is no adjustment, and no need for one, since the distance that the shaft should project outward is determined by the design of the parts. And if the ...


3

I did a quick google image search on 'Giant Defy 2018', found a couple of pics from the left hand side of the bike. The front brake cable is supposed to run outside then down the back of the left fork leg. As you are assembling this yourself I guess you did not purchase at a bike store. If you did though, take it back and have them fix the issue and check ...


3

As other have stated you should be able to use the old headset providing it is in good condition. If you are swapping forks due to an accident then replace the headset even if it feels smooth. Your alloy steerer likely used a "star fangled nut " to apply the headset preload. With a carbon steerer you need a expandable plug that is made for use with carbon ...


3

Unless a spoke is damaged by external forces (e.g. chain falling off the largest cog) they usually break because of insufficient or uneven spoke tension. A spoke should always be under tension. When it’s repeatedly unloaded it can rub a teeny tiny bit against the spoke holes in the hub and the accumulated wear usually causes it to break at the bend after ...


3

Yes, I think that would work The Escape is Altus 8 speed with rim brakes. For a 10 speed replacement group you will not need to mess with the hub, a 10 speed cassette will fit The bottom bracket shell is threaded as the Escape has a cartridge BB. You'll obviously need to replace that with a external bearing unit. It does not matter if the shell is 68 or ...


2

You're looking at around 60km a day on average (presumably a bit more but some rest days). The bike can take it with no trouble. I sometimes ride that sort of distance on a comparable (but older spec) bike, lightly loaded but it's heavier to start with. The tyres may not be optimal if you're almost all on tarmac, though they're probably pretty good for ...


2

The BB you have there is a sealed mechanism but loose ball one. It's very common for those to have one or two lockrings to allow for tensioning of the bearings. It can be replaced with any BB that has the same threads. I would probably just go ahead and replace it with a cartridge BB, they aren't very expensive. As long as you're keeping the same crank, ...


2

There are a few possibilities that come to mind, but there may be others: If the brake pads have been contaminated by something, such as oil or a lubricant, they’ll be almost useless. The pads will move in normally and at the lever the feeling will be of the pads making good contact, but they will be pretty ineffective in slowing you down. You will need new ...


2

Ok, I've been meaning for weeks to write a proper post and never got a chance, so here's a brief summary. Based on the very valuable answers I got here, I took the risk and bought the NECO B910 supplied in a kit with a BB tool. It fits perfect. The old BB was sitting really tight and a few teeth on it cracked in the process of removing it. I used a 250mm ...


2

After the fit, accessories and contact points, I think that wheels are the most important piece of hardware. Unfortunately it's usually the most expensive upgrade save a new group set. Im going to disclude saddle and pedals because they're givens and they need to be comfortable so that expense is unavoidable and not necessarily and upgrade. Good wheels ...


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