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18

First, don't worry about the bike - worry about you. If you need a different bicycle, you'll figure that out pretty fast while you're training to do your 200-mile ride. What's the farthest you've ridden on that bike? 30 miles? Even 50 or 60 miles is only just getting to the edges of what riding 100 miles is like. Fatigue is cumulative - never mind just ...


14

The position of shock mounts is only one variable of many of the rear linkage design. It does not play an isolated role but really is tied to everything else. You might have missed that there are many other designs. The upper mount can be on the top tube as well: Or really, in many other places, like in-line with the seatstays: Or pretty much hidden just ...


12

If the OP's bike has a short cage Shimano rear derailleur, then officially, the maximum cog size is 30t. Going down to 28t is definitely fine, but going over 30t is not technically OK. Shimano's compatibility specifications are known to be conservative, however, so in practice, a 32t cog should work. I would caution against exceeding the maximum cog size by ...


12

Manufacturers design the bike suspension with specific characteristics in mind. For example, should the bike be more poppy or plusher and ground hugging to ride. One parameter in this process is the leverage ratio curve of the rear wheel (Wheel Travel/ Shock travel over the whole travel range). There are many more parameters, but I won't go into details, ...


10

Going down to 11-28 should be fine. Going up to 11-32 will probably be fine. If it were my bike, I would just give it a try and hope for the best, but I tend to be a little cavalier about the possibility of breaking stuff. You'll need to check the specs of your derailleur. There should be a min and max low cog listed, make sure you are within that. ...


9

Stability of load will likely be quite different between the Tubus and giant racks. For the Tubus racks the Tara had a cross brace to help stabilize the load. The Tubus duo does not, but if you look carefully it mounts to both the inside and the outside of the mid fork eyelets, while the Tara mounts only to the outside. This adds stability lost by not ...


8

How far have you ridden in a day? The bike will be fine, as the comments say the question is whether you will be. A road bike is more efficient and will get you there easier, but there are many people who could do the ride on a hybrid or worse. Are you one of them? Decades ago when I was in college I rode a century on a basic bike with a Sturmey-Archer 3 ...


7

This is a 1996 Giant Sedona. I had this exact bike, right down to the color. The frame is 4130 cro mo and the tubes are 'triple butted'. If you notice the top tube and down tube are flared at the joints. The was the 'external butting' and they were also butted for tube wall thickness internally. The groupset was entirely shimano STX, which, at the price ...


7

Well, 26 will feel a whole lot better than your current 23. You can get away with lower air pressure because of the larger volume supporting your weight. Lower pressure means smoother ride. Of course two tires of the same size can feel very different because of the quality of the casing and rubber. For commuting, I would say get as big as you can fit, which ...


7

You should ask the seller for all the information you need about the bike, because a) they should know more than we do and b) if they can't give it to you readily then there is more risk that it is stolen. These things do happen! Don't tell the seller this, but the name is usually written on the frame. If they can't manage that much then consider walking ...


7

Giant's page on the Conduct semi-hydraulic brake system says that, emphasis mine: There's no need to replace your mechanical brake lever or handlebar tape - simply shorten your current cable housing, then mount the new master cylinder on your Giant Contact SL or Contact stem. It appears that the lowest-end Contact stem is $53 in the US. This is more ...


7

In practice, there is one thing I've seen enough to call it a pattern: aero/teardrop carbon seatstays and chainstays cracking near the joints after being flexed excessively during a crash. Some of these combine very light construction with a very flat joint in the side to side direction. Some frames like this you could probably break by falling over at low ...


6

A good investment for someone new to cycling who starts with such a sporty bike is to get a good bike fit. Based on the findings of the fit a part that maybe has to be replaced, is the stem. As these come at different lengths but are not adjustable. You need to get pedals as well. You may choose between flat pedals, clip-less road pedals and clip-less ...


5

It wears fast because there are fewer teeth in contact with the chain, but that might not be the cause. Here are some other possibilities: A stiff chain link is most noticeable with a small sprocket. It's also more annoying if not more noticeable when under load. This tends to cause an even rhythm under steady pedalling, about one every 3 pedal strokes ...


5

Check if all spokes are properly tightened. if some spokes are too loose that can put extra stress on the rest of the spokes which can cause premature failure. If so (some of the spokes are not properly tensioned) you should true the wheel (or have it done if you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself). Is the back wheel the original back wheel that came ...


5

It looks like a 2017 Giant Contend SL2 Disc: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/gb/contend-sl-2-disc-2017. The picture is quite grainy so it's hard to be 100% sure. Check if it has the Giant Conduct disc brake system to be sure. Here's the image in the linked product page for the 2017 Giant Contend SL2 Disc:


5

Depends on the actual spec, but both bikes, as you've identified are fairly similar apart from the suspension. https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/atx-3 https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/escape-3 The drivetrain & brakes are almost the same, but the Escape is slightly more road oriented with 700x38mm tyres, whereas the other has 26 or 27.5" x about ...


5

The paint scheme looks like that of the 2009 Giant Defy Advanced 1 Check out https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/value-guide/product/3050124/ bikepedia.com and bicylebluebook.com have lots of info on bikes by year and model. Here's the 2010 Giant Defy 1, which again looks very similar, with a few minor differences in the paint scheme: https://www.bicyclebluebook....


5

I would say they (both posts) are most likely either being intentionally misleading or they don't actually know what kind of bike they have. Looking at their the 2016 Defy 1, it seems to be disk only, and be specced with 105 level components. Even going back to 2013 which is as far back as Giant's site seems to go back, it's still speced with 105 level ...


5

Any lightweight road frame of any material can be dented very easily. As long as you don’t see a mark on the frame indicating that it touched the ground, there’s nothing to worry about.


4

It has a regular old quick release. The bike is way too low end to have a thru axle. You can see from pictures of the bike that it has dropouts in the fork and rear triangle, so the wheels are inserted in vertically. A thru axle does not have dropouts -- the axle has to go through the fork/frame. The wheel cannot be pulled vertically out from the frame.


4

All frames flex to some extent due to impacts or road shocks or vibrations. Some frames are better at absorbing this than others. All frame designers engineer their frames to attenuate these imperfections in riding conditions appropriately (for control/comfort reasons) by varying the size/shape of tubes and their compositions SAVE is Cannondale's marketing ...


4

The answers are mostly opinion based but here goes ... I'd leave the bike alone to start with. After you get an decent amount of miles on it a you may find you want a different length stem, different handlebar or seat etc. To optimize your riding experience I'd invest in good, well fitting shoes and pedals, good clothing, helmet, water bottles, a multitool ...


4

You can get racks, what you get will largely depend on the load. The two styles that work are a seat post mount rack or once that clamps to the seat stay. Seatposts often have a low load limit, and can be prone to swinging around, but are generally very popular. Using on on a carbon frame would have to be done with caution - ensure a long seat post insertion....


4

This is a Giant Lafree e-trans e-bike. They were made in three versions from 1999 on and yours is the Sport model. It has two SLA batteries totalling 24 volts in the case. The roadster version I knew had the charger integrated in the bike so your's probably has too.


4

The specs of the thru-axle that you need are here. The one that you need is T1707, which is 12×142 with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 and the T1711 both fit a 142×12 mm with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 has an axle length of 162.5 mm, while the T1711 has an axle length of 175 mm. I couldn't find the TCR specs for this online, but since I ride a Giant Propel ...


4

Unless a spoke is damaged by external forces (e.g. chain falling off the largest cog) they usually break because of insufficient or uneven spoke tension. A spoke should always be under tension. When it’s repeatedly unloaded it can rub a teeny tiny bit against the spoke holes in the hub and the accumulated wear usually causes it to break at the bend after ...


4

I think you are confused about the frame 'technologies' that Giant offers. More boxes checked does not mean a better frame, the choices are mutually exclusive. 'Advanced Composite' means a carbon fiber composite (CFC) frame. 'ALUXX' means an aluminium alloy frame. CFC frames are generally held to be superior to alloy ones. I'll give you that the 'SL' and ...


4

It looks a lot like a 2011 Giant Cypress ST Giant used this frame with a variety of components over several years. I tried to match components and graphics to the correct year This bike falls into the "comfort" bike category. Giant still makes a bike with the "Cypress" label but the frame is different.


4

"whether it's a reasonable goal to try to make your gravel bike 'more road bike-like' with different tires" It is. "and how to achieve it." By mounting a road tyre. That is all there is to it. We can then get into long arguments between the proponents of Continental vs. Schwalbe, vs Challenge vs. Vittoria vs. Tufo vs. whatever... It is ...


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