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19

No. What blinds you is the relative brightness of the bike lights and the fact that unlike legal car lights, many of them are pointing straight at your face. The yellow lenses are designed to increase contrast in daylight. They work by blocking blue light, which is scattered so that it comes from all directions and makes shadows less visible. EDIT: The ...


15

The easy answer is a wide-brim hat or long visor on your helmet. This does work, at least at low speeds. You will have to experiment with options, as nothing like this is sold for this purpose as far as I can tell. Over about 20kph the length of brim you need gets silly, and by 30kph you need half a metre or so (there are some velomobile owners that do this)...


14

How do downhill riders cope with this? With a front fender or with a mud guard such as this. With goggles which use disposable tear off lenses or the ones with a reel of fresh len material which is pulled via a string or via bluetooth or something. Does the full-face helmet protect the mask in some way? Probably not. Do they apply anti-water coating ...


14

I have had my glasses damaged when falling off/getting hit on my bicycle, even with a helmet. Since my lenses are polycarbonate, they tend to just bounce on the road if they do come out of the frame. I'd think in some of those hits that my glasses would have broken if they were made from glass (especially when my glasses have hit the curb or rocks). Based ...


8

I'm very short-sighted and couldn't cycle at all without my glasses on. I don't find any particular problem cycling in the rain, and I don't see how the cycling-friendliness or otherwise of the city would make any difference to that. Yes, rain on my glasses degrades my vision a bit, but I've never found it problematic. Wearing a cap helps a bit. People say ...


7

The visor certainly helps - mine broke away 6 months ago, but the helmet is undamaged. Its almost impossible to find replacement brims. So you might want to think about your technique. Try riding more defensively: Learn to See rather than Look - that's noticing motion through a raindrop or obstruction. Position yourself on the road to avoid possible ...


7

I have to wear glasses at all times, and I do cycle in all kinds of weather. Including rainy nights. The following is the rationalization of what I experience (I do know a bit about physics): When you have rain on your glasses, the raindrops are totally out-of-focus, and there is usually quite an amount of glass surface that's not currently covered by ...


6

Look for downhill MTB goggles. These will be made to fit with a standard bike helmet and will have sticky plastic on the straps so that they will stay in place on your helmet. I rode with a pair last winter and was very happy with them. Kept my eyes warm and didn't fog even under heavy riding. Many also come standard with clear lens so visibility won't ...


5

Many cycling gloves are designed with a chamois or microfibre panel on the thumb section. This allows you to wipe glasses with the back of your thumb. It sounds rubbish, but it works really well, even when the gloves are saturated with water. Of course you have to wipe your glasses quite frequently, but in my experience not so much as to impair my riding. ...


5

I'll answer you comment on contacts, as I think you should investigate it. I had the same dilemma a year ago. After wearing glasses for a couple of years for close up stuff, I was getting to the point I needed glasses while out on the trail. I looked around at options and decided to go down the contacts path. I now wear contacts in weekends and while ...


4

Ski goggles are a good option, but the main problem with ski goggles is that they block your peripheral vision, even if you have clear lenses. You should augment them with a helmet mounted mirror. These work well with balaclavas (which are nice in the winter, depending on where you live). Regular old clear safety glasses like you use in high school ...


4

Full Disclosure, I work for ColdAvenger Face Masks. Fogging is a difficult issue and our mask is only one part of the solution. We designed the masks to protect your lungs and keep moisture away from your skin. That being said, they do a great job with preventing fogging. ColdAvenger masks have a hidden nose-wire built into the binding above the ...


4

I'd like to expand on the answers offered by @STW and @Mac. The current rules here ask us not to offer product recommendations (the rules at the time of the original question may have differed). I'm going to focus on what to look for instead of specific products. Coverage I believe the OP had glasses that weren't sport-specific, which Oakley may call ...


4

Sunglasses have two enemies: dirt and UV rays. The polycarbonate itself is fairly tough and can last over ten years. It’s likely to get scratched up before the UV starts to cause it to yellow or ‘craze.’ The coatings are more delicate. The anti reflective coatings are easily scratched especially if you use your sweat and dirt soaked jersey to 'clean' them....


3

There are sevral options to prevent wet glasses. Do not ride in rain This is absolutely foolproof, but it doesn't solve the problem if you want/need to ride. Do not wear glasses in the rain You will have clear view, but in heavy rain and/or higher wind this is painful and may be dangerous. They who must wear corrective glasses cannot use that option for ...


3

I use regular "safety" glasses for my clear riding pair (anytime it isn't sunny): They work really well since they cover a large area and keep the wind out of my eyes. Great for myself with my contacts. The only downside I have with these are that they will fog up when I'm sitting still, but moving clears them off. If it is at a light, not enough to be a ...


3

I've worn glasses for 30+ years now. My normal techniques are: Keep wearing the glasses - don't be tempted to ride without. A user with a low prescription might get away with it, but you want your eyesight as good as possible while on the roadway. At about +13, I can't even walk around reliably without my glasses. Move the head a lot to look around, not ...


2

FYI I use simple prescription glasses or sunglasses, where the frame is attached to the top of each lens, but not down the sides of the lens nor underneath -- so there isn't a frame at the side of the lens, blocking vision. Also the arm (between the frame and the ear) isn't thick. The lenses are long-distance only, not progressive.


2

The answer is "they are probably safe" and "they don't work for spit". Skiers have exactly this same problem with ski goggles and what I have learned in 50 years of skiing is that if the goggle has an built in anti-fog coating, cleaning it with anything but a mild soap will ruin what minimal anti fog coating it has. Sunglasses generally don't have much in ...


2

Anti-reflective coating is the first solution that comes to mind. No brand of clear-lens safety glasses occurs to me, but you might try a trick I used many years ago when I commuted by motorcycle in less than optimal lighting or weather: Car-wax the lenses. Keeps softer plastics from scratching as badly, and changes the surface characteristics of the more ...


2

I have a pair of Oakley Fives with prescription and transition lenses. They're ideal for cycling. I don't have to worry about changing lenses, as they are always the right shade. I'm really happy with them and couldn't recommend them highly enough. Also see this answer for a slightly different context.


2

Just wanted to put something down about the path I eventually chose, in case it helps anyone in the future. Having talked once again to my optician we agreed that contact lenses would probably not be best for me at the moment. My vision is fine close-up, it's really for distance that I need the glasses. The glasses I have, therefore, are great for driving, ...


2

As a blind mole cyclist who has worn glasses for 30+ years, I'm more scared of dropping my glasses and smashing them on the ground. Without my prescription glasses, I can walk but I certainly can't ride or drive safely. However my helmet is always worn properly, so it provides a shelf of protection out from the forehead. I've had two significant ...


2

Additional suggestion is to turn your head a little, and often rather than holding the head still and moving your eyes. As you move your head, your eyeballs get a "line of sight" around any particular drop, and your brain ends up "gluing" the image together. Its a subconscious thing, but works well enough when combined with the other physical solutions ...


2

In a heavy rain, I just take my glasses off. Hats or similar don't really protect the glasses enough to be worth the trouble.


2

As a halfway to wearing a full face helmet, there are helmets with eye-shields like or one with less tail: Or there are add-ons to your existing helmet which may fit. https://bikerumor.com/2015/11/12/rcc15-wide-eyez-flips-any-helmet-into-integrated-visor-mode/ and https://www.wideeyez.com/


2

The vision it mostly interfered by raindrops sticking on the glass when the glass between raindrops is still dry. This happens in the beginning of the rain. It helps to sweep the glass with the finger, so that all surface becomes equally wet and drops find they way down faster. It is not the same as the dry glass in good weather but the vision improves.


2

Maybe. Some manufacturers of these kinds of glasses claim that their products can help reduce glares from other cars using LED headlights. I'm not sure how much blue light it filters out. It's the blue rich LEDs that are more blinding. Some LEDs are better at preserving our night vision such as warm white, yellow, orange, and red. Warmer colours, blue ...


2

I've been trying some yellow clip-ons which mount to the front of my glasses. They produce a definite yellow tint to everything. In addition car windows look extra yellow at some angles, because they are reflecting the blue sky. Downsides, having a second layer of translucent material means two more surface boundaries for light to refract, so there's a ...


2

An ex-coworker of mine got a pair of goggles that he could put over his prescription glasses. In his case not so much because of dirt on the lenses, but because wind bothered his eyes. A lot of the ones you'll find are the high-durability ones for mountain bikers (with thick heavy frames), but it is possible to find lightweight (and not so ugly ones) like ...


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