Hot answers tagged

20

There are many factors that influence choices. - terrain you ride, sunlight intensity, shade effects etc, and personal preference. A quick internet search will give you technical answers on what colors do look here . For me personally, I mostly Mountain Bike, I live in New Zealand, which has extremely high UV light levels. Therefore I do not venture out ...


19

No. What blinds you is the relative brightness of the bike lights and the fact that unlike legal car lights, many of them are pointing straight at your face. The yellow lenses are designed to increase contrast in daylight. They work by blocking blue light, which is scattered so that it comes from all directions and makes shadows less visible. EDIT: The ...


14

I have had my glasses damaged when falling off/getting hit on my bicycle, even with a helmet. Since my lenses are polycarbonate, they tend to just bounce on the road if they do come out of the frame. I'd think in some of those hits that my glasses would have broken if they were made from glass (especially when my glasses have hit the curb or rocks). Based ...


13

How do downhill riders cope with this? With a front fender or with a mud guard such as this. With goggles which use disposable tear off lenses or the ones with a reel of fresh len material which is pulled via a string or via bluetooth or something. Does the full-face helmet protect the mask in some way? Probably not. Do they apply anti-water coating ...


13

The easy answer is a wide-brim hat or long visor on your helmet. This does work, at least at low speeds. You will have to experiment with options, as nothing like this is sold for this purpose as far as I can tell. Over about 20kph the length of brim you need gets silly, and by 30kph you need half a metre or so (there are some velomobile owners that do this)...


11

I suffered from foggy glasses a lot, I prefer to wear clear lenses since I tend to ride after dark frequently. I tried a few of different cycling glasses with clear lenses, eyeglasses with anti-fog coating, motorcycle goggles, and several pairs of safety glasses with no luck. I finally found a pair of $9 MSA Safety Works safety goggles with anti fog coating ...


9

Yes, in most cases normal prescription glasses sit too low on the nose for the purpose of shielding the eyes in road bike position. And as the speed increases, the need for effective eye protection grows, too. Consider either: Getting contact lenses, and then you can wear bike specific glasses Getting bike glasses with prescription lens inserts. In my ...


9

Coatings are fairly useless on their own. Condensation happens because warm wet air is hitting a surface below a certain temperature (condensation point). Coatings tend to just encourage beading and run off. I'd look for a pair of double-lens ski goggles. It's as it sounds and works in a similar way to double glazing. Two sets of "glass" separated by some ...


8

I'm very short-sighted and couldn't cycle at all without my glasses on. I don't find any particular problem cycling in the rain, and I don't see how the cycling-friendliness or otherwise of the city would make any difference to that. Yes, rain on my glasses degrades my vision a bit, but I've never found it problematic. Wearing a cap helps a bit. People say ...


6

The Hindsight glasses include fresnel lenses that widen the peripheral field, at the cost of increased distortion. As stated in the article, this is a design concept, so there's no guarantee it will ever make it to market. And although it's a neat idea, it would take a lot of testing to determine whether the tradeoffs are worth it for enough people. This ...


6

Look for downhill MTB goggles. These will be made to fit with a standard bike helmet and will have sticky plastic on the straps so that they will stay in place on your helmet. I rode with a pair last winter and was very happy with them. Kept my eyes warm and didn't fog even under heavy riding. Many also come standard with clear lens so visibility won't ...


6

The visor certainly helps - mine broke away 6 months ago, but the helmet is undamaged. Its almost impossible to find replacement brims. So you might want to think about your technique. Try riding more defensively: Learn to See rather than Look - that's noticing motion through a raindrop or obstruction. Position yourself on the road to avoid possible ...


6

I have to wear glasses at all times, and I do cycle in all kinds of weather. Including rainy nights. The following is the rationalization of what I experience (I do know a bit about physics): When you have rain on your glasses, the raindrops are totally out-of-focus, and there is usually quite an amount of glass surface that's not currently covered by ...


5

I'll answer you comment on contacts, as I think you should investigate it. I had the same dilemma a year ago. After wearing glasses for a couple of years for close up stuff, I was getting to the point I needed glasses while out on the trail. I looked around at options and decided to go down the contacts path. I now wear contacts in weekends and while ...


5

Many cycling gloves are designed with a chamois or microfibre panel on the thumb section. This allows you to wipe glasses with the back of your thumb. It sounds rubbish, but it works really well, even when the gloves are saturated with water. Of course you have to wipe your glasses quite frequently, but in my experience not so much as to impair my riding. ...


4

Safety Glasses. I no longer bother with prescription sunglasses, I have multiple pairs of Uvex safety glasses that fit nicely over my glasses. There are multiple lenses that filter all UV, come in different colours, etc. I also have a pair with clear lenses that I use when it's particularly dusty or dirty. (e.g. I sometimes ride over a very busy bridge) ...


4

Ordinary prescription glasses are sufficient but suboptimal. Although I agree that the best answer is to get bike glasses with prescription lenses or contact lenses, waiting to get optimal eyewear is no reason to avoid using a road bike. I wear prescription glasses and have not yet budgeted for cycling glasses, but I have not had any major problems. Cycling ...


4

I think it depends largely on conditions. I like to wear Bollé glasses and treated myself to a pair last summer. They do lots of variations so before purchasing the glasses I did a bit of research. They published a really useful paper outlining the appropriateness of different colour lenses under different light conditions, Very useful. A couple of other ...


4

I'd like to expand on the answers offered by @STW and @Mac. The current rules here ask us not to offer product recommendations (the rules at the time of the original question may have differed). I'm going to focus on what to look for instead of specific products. Coverage I believe the OP had glasses that weren't sport-specific, which Oakley may call ...


4

Ski goggles are a good option, but the main problem with ski goggles is that they block your peripheral vision, even if you have clear lenses. You should augment them with a helmet mounted mirror. These work well with balaclavas (which are nice in the winter, depending on where you live). Regular old clear safety glasses like you use in high school ...


4

Sunglasses have two enemies: dirt and UV rays. The polycarbonate itself is fairly tough and can last over ten years. It’s likely to get scratched up before the UV starts to cause it to yellow or ‘craze.’ The coatings are more delicate. The anti reflective coatings are easily scratched especially if you use your sweat and dirt soaked jersey to 'clean' them....


3

I use regular "safety" glasses for my clear riding pair (anytime it isn't sunny): They work really well since they cover a large area and keep the wind out of my eyes. Great for myself with my contacts. The only downside I have with these are that they will fog up when I'm sitting still, but moving clears them off. If it is at a light, not enough to be a ...


3

Full Disclosure, I work for ColdAvenger Face Masks. Fogging is a difficult issue and our mask is only one part of the solution. We designed the masks to protect your lungs and keep moisture away from your skin. That being said, they do a great job with preventing fogging. ColdAvenger masks have a hidden nose-wire built into the binding above the ...


3

Eyeglasses, particularly those with relatively "low profile" lenses, will cause problems in an extreme aero crouch position. So it depends on the specifics of your glasses, the bike, and your usual riding position. I'm extremely nearsighted and wear glasses that are about midway on the round/low-profile axis. I ride a touring bike (ie, a road frame) with ...


3

There are sevral options to prevent wet glasses. Do not ride in rain This is absolutely foolproof, but it doesn't solve the problem if you want/need to ride. Do not wear glasses in the rain You will have clear view, but in heavy rain and/or higher wind this is painful and may be dangerous. They who must wear corrective glasses cannot use that option for ...


3

I've worn glasses for 30+ years now. My normal techniques are: Keep wearing the glasses - don't be tempted to ride without. A user with a low prescription might get away with it, but you want your eyesight as good as possible while on the roadway. At about +13, I can't even walk around reliably without my glasses. Move the head a lot to look around, not ...


2

When wearing a balaclava I've found that I really have to concentrate on breathing through the fabric as opposed to letting my breath travel up and out around the eye opening, especially when stopped. If you're still having significant issues with fogging without the balaclava it may be that the glasses actually fit too snugly to your face and perspiration ...


2

I've never heard of this being a problem for anyone... but I admittedly stick to the more upright-seated end of the bicycle continuum. I suggest you try before you buy, of course, but you may also wish to look for a bike with a longer stem, so that if you find you have this trouble, you can raise your handlebars. Cyclocross bikes should actually be a bit ...


2

FYI I use simple prescription glasses or sunglasses, where the frame is attached to the top of each lens, but not down the sides of the lens nor underneath -- so there isn't a frame at the side of the lens, blocking vision. Also the arm (between the frame and the ear) isn't thick. The lenses are long-distance only, not progressive.


2

Clear glasses with no tint and a good 100% UV and Fog resistant coating that do not block peripheral vision are useful in the almost any conditions They may not be optimal for all, they have the fewest benefits but few faults. They are generally safe and useful in Dawn, Day, Dusk, and Night conditions. Lenses with any Tint may be dangerous at night or at ...


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