24

To ride in the dark is difficult. You should have a decent head light on your helmet so it tracks your vision, and a handlebar light that tracks where your front wheel is aiming. In addition you should have a secondary front light and two back lights for redundancy. We don't make product recommendations here, but that would be the minimum. To increase ...


21

From Sheldon Brown: Spoke Protector A plastic or sheet-metal disc that fits between the cluster and the right-side spokes of a rear wheel. This is intended to prevent the derailer or chain from getting caught in the spokes, possibly causing very extensive/expensive damage/destruction to the wheel, the derailer, and the frame. A spoke ...


18

It's used for attaching a child seat similar to this one. The above site shows a clearer image of the part in question which might be useful to future visitors.


18

First, don't worry about the bike - worry about you. If you need a different bicycle, you'll figure that out pretty fast while you're training to do your 200-mile ride. What's the farthest you've ridden on that bike? 30 miles? Even 50 or 60 miles is only just getting to the edges of what riding 100 miles is like. Fatigue is cumulative - never mind just ...


15

Novices I've ridden with are surprised and pleased that I ride behind them. They set the pace I can watch what they're doing I can ride close (enough to talk) without being too close (i.e. without colliding) I can recommend which gear they change and when I keep car traffic off their tail (e.g. by my using arm-signals to the car to say "slow down" or "...


15

These are cable guide parts. From the looks of it, you have: 2 Housing shims, used to secure hydraulic lines or brake housing in the braze-ons of the frame, or for securing the housing at the point it enters the frame in the case of internal housing. 1 Headset adjustment bolt button, used to keep water out of the bolt in the center of your headset cap, or ...


15

Yes, its been done before, there are various configurations. Google for 'Bikepacking tarp shelter' for many ideas. Good resources for this type of thing are bikepacking.net forums and in the UK Bear bones bikepacking. Here are some examples:


12

The new Claris, called R2000, has internally routed brake and shifter cables, an improvement on a previous version, that still sported the externally routed shifting cables. It is still 8 speed group, so in line with the op's wishes. https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/claris-r2000.html dealers manual, page 13, how to install shifter cable: ...


11

Blinding road users will be the result of the following factors: Total light output Mirror design (how is the light shaped) How you aimed your light Most trail lights (and high output battery powered lights) use a mirror that casts the light in a symmetrical shape. This means light is cast up, down, left and right. Light cast above the horizon is what ...


11

It should be. That's how I navigate on all my rides, wet or otherwise (phone on the bars). I've done this for a few years, but not completely without incident. Some tips: Make sure all port covers are tightly closed; I even grease mine very lightly. Consider how you will charge if necessary (I might otherwise plug in to a battery pack or my dynamo while ...


10

Move your weight further forward to keep the front wheel weighted. Shuffle forwards on your seat and bring your chest closer to the bars. Standing can help for the steepest parts, but can cause your rear wheel to slip on loose surfaces. The front wheel is lifting as when your bike is on a slope the wheelbase is effectively shortened, bringing your weight ...


10

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


10

At some point you are still on the bike, but the mistake has already been made and you are looking for the exit option that will minimise damage. Jamming the front brake on while in a tight corner does not 'minimise damage' Experience rider would have probably seen the debris earlier or not been riding as fast, and is always thinking what alternatives they ...


10

In the current situation I have time on my hands to try things, but only at home (hence the cramped pictures below, with garden toys in). An injury meant last year's trip didn't happen as planned, but I bought the tarp anyway. As I commented before, keeping the bike upright with guy ropes should work, and it does. Here they're attached to the drops. To ...


9

Get a tarp, and use your bike to provide at least three mounting points for it. Dozens of examples of how people do it: https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/54639/ My quick and dirty solution several years ago: If you want a fancier solution, there are "bike-specific tents" (google the phrase): image source


9

You don't mention where you will be riding so I have to use my own area as an example. Using your bike as part of a tarp/tent rig is a horrible example. I know your trying to keep weight down, but even a simple tarp/lean-to is better than using your bike. This is opinion, but one of the few places to spend some extra weight is rest and food. For example, a ...


8

This from an old article circa 1996 it references a Medai floor pump. "Screwed into the base near the compression tube is an air tight steel chamber. This chamber is known as a reservoir and holds a volume of the compressed air to assist in equalizing the pressure of the pumps compression chamber and the inner tube. This feature gives the tire a small assist ...


8

Do I need to put myself through easier challenges/trainings before I embark on my planned trip? That depends. What is the farthest you've cycled in one go before now? I suggest you skip your next gym visit and go for a 10 mile cycle. If that works out, take a 20 mile cycle the next time. What food and equipment do I need? A spare tube, tyre, mini-...


8

Bicycles, like many machines, are efficient, but a large amount of energy converted by them is not in fact used for their "intended" purpose: The largest energy sink is air/wind resistance, which you can only very marginally improve on a "normal" bike†. However, wind resistance squares in relation to your speed, so maintaining a more leisurely pace would ...


8

Given your low budget, priority for me would be to have the gear needed to get going after a road side problem, followed by maintenance tools so you can do as much work as needed yourself. Then add stuff that makes life easier. Roadside repair kit includes: Pump Tire levers Spare Tube Puncture repair kit Multitool - Cheap ones will fix many road ...


8

How far have you ridden in a day? The bike will be fine, as the comments say the question is whether you will be. A road bike is more efficient and will get you there easier, but there are many people who could do the ride on a hybrid or worse. Are you one of them? Decades ago when I was in college I rode a century on a basic bike with a Sturmey-Archer 3 ...


7

I have seen various tow rope devices based on bungie cords used in multi-event team races[1], but I'd suggest those are even harder to learn than drafting. Having someone pull on the bike unexpectedly can cause all kinds of control problems. It's not something I'd recommend using with a novice. It's generally only used on long uphill slogs. A tow rope just ...


7

From my experience, the single most important point is properly choosing your route. Google maps and the satellite view are your friends. For example, there is a 2x2 lanes road nearby. I see cyclists there quite often when I drive. It is an extremely dangerous road, 90 km/h, big lorries, no shoulder. There is a smaller, parallel road though. It is very nice ...


6

We have 50 cyclists at work, out of 170 people. When I started the spares were the odd tube on a desk, perhaps without holes, and the only tools in the place was a floor pump and about 60x 6mm hex drivers. I had a cleanout and rationalise at home, and brought in some surplus screwdrivers and so on. Other people have done the same, so there's now a work ...


6

You can work on a pedal stroke that applies pressure for a larger portion of the rotation of the pedals. That will reduce the peak force that is causing the wheel to lift.


6

I would suggest that your bike is not set up correctly and your centre of gravity is too far back. The first thing to consider is what is the predominant terrain you are riding? If its mostly flat consider using a technique such as alex has suggested in his answer to cover pinch climbs and small hills. If your doing a lot of climbing (sitting on the front ...


6

I am an Audax club member and so am mostly riding on high speed country roads - B class highways in the main. Firstly I would say that just as a good driver should be using a 'system of car control' to avoid collisions, then in exactly they same manner, and with exactly the same system, so should a bike rider. And this would be whether in the city or the ...


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


6

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


6

The interplay between Head Angle and fork rake and trail are biggest factors influencing (low speed/no speed) bicycle handling. Steep head angles and shallow trail values result in an increased sensitivity (more Twitchy) feels to steering input. I would argue that these factors are factors that describe the handling responsiveness of a bike and not its ...


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