Hot answers tagged

99

No. It is safety gear – buy a new one. The old helmet might make a good pot for a hanging plant but it is more likely to fail dramatically in your moment of need. The straps would probably come right with a soak in water, but the polystychrene is the functional part and it has failed with age. It might fill a legal requirement if your location mandates ...


55

The problems you describe absolutely disqualify it from being used (as a bike helmet). I would not use a 15 year old helmet in any case, even if it did not exhibit any evidence of damage.


45

Generally helmets are recommended for carrier usage by manufacturers and governing bodies, although local cultural practices may vary depending on perceived risks. Helmets are recommended because it is still possible to crash or even roll a trailer, just as it is possible to crash on a bicycle, even if you are riding slowly and in quiet areas. While ...


41

If your head didn't hit the road, the helmet absorbed no impact so it will be as good as before the event. You're not sure whether the helmet did take an impact - which is reasonable. A lot happens in a short time while crashing. So check: the outside of the helmet - you know roughly what part of the helmet would have hit the ground. If there are more ...


40

The foam protects the head from impacts by deforming. The plastic cover obviously protects the foam from wear and aging. However it also serves safety aspects in most helmets: A good helmet has a smooth outer shape, preferably close to a ball, to allow it to slide over tarmac or other hard surfaces in an accident. The hard and smooth plastic outer shell ...


40

It's worthless. The many issues you cite would be reason enough to trash a 5 minute old helmet. Many manufacturers also put expiration dates on their helmets, claiming the foam gets too hard or soft or some such and it can't do its job. While that very well might just be a cash grab, it might not be, and so that coupled with the fact that it isn't in ...


36

One thing the plastic is designed to do (and for which it doesn't need to be thick) is to have low friction with the road. So if you come off your head slides rather than snagging. The friction that the plastic stops would injure your neck, and also lead to very fast abrasion of the foam,perhaps just in time for it to be destroyed before you hit something ...


36

The helmet you've been offered sounds like it's in terrible condition. Frankly, any fifteen-year-old helmet has probably degraded far enough that it's not going to protect you properly, but this one is clear junk. It's not "gently used": it's wrecked. However, it's condition is largely irrelevant. Don't buy any second-hand helmet. It's as simple as that. A ...


20

BHSI.org says the following: Did you drop it hard enough to crack the foam? Replace. For starters, most people are aware that you must replace a helmet after any crash where your head hit. The foam part of a helmet is made for one-time use, and after crushing once it is no longer as protective as it was, even if it still looks intact. Bear in mind ...


20

Bike helmets are a one-use item- the foam crushes to absorb the impact, and then is useless after. Because of this, most helmet manufacturers recommend replacing helmets once ever 3 years, due to a combination of crushing from day-to-day usage (all those times you crammed it into a backpack or had it slightly bounce off a wall while walking with it), and ...


20

We opted for helmeting our kid whenever we use the trailer in bicycle mode (i.e. not as a pram). This is why: Our neighbours managed to flip over their trailer once. Kid got a nasty bump on the head, despite having been strapped in. Establish from the start that bicycles and helmets go together, no discussion.


20

Try searching for the term "ear band". They tend to be thin enough to comfortably wear under a helmet, and the good ones are fully wind-resistant, yet breathable. If you have an open ventilation-style helmet, I recommend a helmet cover as well, which is a fabric sleeve that stretches over the top of the helmet which also significantly cuts wind passing ...


19

I put some "scuffs" on my spare helmet the other day. It's a couple of years old, and I'm not that careful with my gear, but despite being clipped to the outside of a backpack on a train floor every day it looked no more than grubby. How did it get scuffed? It was on my head bouncing on the tarmac as I slid across the road when I came off the bike. Nearly ...


18

"Women's" helmet is a pure marketing feature. All helmets have to pass the same safety standards and if it fits wear it. Most helmet models come in at least 2 or 3 sizes. You should be able to find a helmet in the size that fits your head diameter. All the major manufacturers make helmets for every head size from 2 year olds to XL for adults. Every helmet ...


18

They are designed for different things: climbing helmets have more protection against sharp object penetrating the shell from directly above, while bicycle helmets have more protection for a high force hit with a blunt object (the ground, car bonnets etc) from the sides, front and back. If helmets are required where you live, unless the climbing helmet ...


18

There is a common "fact" out there that you should replace a helmet after 5 years, regardless of use or crashes as there is concern that the crush properties of the foam may have changed (e.g., hardening) which could provide less protection. However the data doesn't seem to bare this out. A recent study did extensive testing of hundreds of used helmets ...


17

Summary Research into brain injuries has been ongoing, but tended to focus more on direct impacts. In the last 70 years there has been more research into rotational brain injuries, and in the 1990s and 2000s scientific, evidence based proposals were made to reduce these. The Multi-Directional Impact ­Protection System is an implementation of these, and it's ...


17

Helmets have advanced a lot in the last 15 years. Safety reasons aside from the helmet falling apart (which is more than enough reason not to buy it) modern helmets are night and day more comfortable to wear. Not worth it.


16

No, your kid does not need a helmet, if you have a proper trailer. Proper trailers do have belts and rollover protection. If you don't wear a helmet in your car, you don't need one in a trailer. Smaller kids without proper neck muscles should be seated in a special seat (like the fitting car seats), which doesn't permit helmets. Manufacturer advice is mixed:...


14

I have a thin material tube that can be used for a lot of things. Also called a headsock or necksock or a buff. I wear mine around my neck, with the top edge at my mouth/nose, and up over my ears at the back. The lower edge rides on my shoulders and slightly over my collarbone. Some buffs have a split on both sides and cover the top of the chest a bit....


14

All bicycle helmets are subject to the same standardized set of impact tests during the certification process. If the helmet product passes, it meets the minimum criteria for protection, regardless of how much it costs, weights and which proprietary technologies it uses. The subtle point here is that the existing certification protocols are rather ...


13

One purpose of a visor is to shield the sun like a baseball cap. There are many factors: Wind resistance is not as big a factor on a mountain bike (slower speeds). The more upright position on a mountain bike puts a visor more into play. On a road bike the rider is leaning forward and facing down and the visor can even block forward view. A visor ...


13

Yes, some convertible helmets can be as safe as Full Face Helmets. The safety standard for the protection of a full face mountain bike helmet is ASTM F1952 - Standard Specification for Helmets Used for Downhill Mountain Bicycle Racing. This covers the chin bar and a higher level of testing than EN-1078 (such as a higher drop height 1.2 to 1.6). En-1078 is ...


13

A scientific study has found age makes not difference to the protection provided by a bicycle helmet. The study took 63 used and unused, but not crashed, helmets and tested them. Ultimately it reported "Based on these data, the impact attenuation properties of EPS foam in field-used bicycle helmets do not degrade with the age." Refer The Journal of ...


13

If we check the helmet's documentation, there's guaranteed to be some legalese text in there similar to: modifications to the helmet will void warranty, and may decrease the effectiveness of the helmet. Do not modify your helmet. Or words to that effect. A helmet has three main components A foam inner, to absorb impact and "lengthen" a ...


12

I know this is an old thread but I thought I'd answer it anyway! I own one of these but did a lot of reading around the subject of helmets before my purchase and even then I deliberated for over a year! During that time they released version 2 of their Hovding which is lighter and more comfortable (according to their website). The price has also dropped to £...


12

Unbeknownst to many consumers, different helmet manufacturers use different molds for their helmets. Just like some shoe brands are known to be thinner or wider than other brands, some helmets are more oval, some more round, and some pointier. Even from the same manufacturer, their racing models might be different from MTB, skateboarding type, and general ...


12

Of course no, it doesn't do any harm that the helmet gets wet in WATER. It is made of various plastics, which per se are insensitive to water, and also it is supposed to be worn even though the cyclist is cycling under rain or snow. Also, your sweat is basically water and some salts. If water was dangerous to helmets you should not sweat when wearing them :...


12

This is an unconventional answer but it works for me. I have an aero TT helmet that has fairings over the ears. The reason the fairings exist is to reduce my head's aerodynamic drag, but in doing so, it also takes my ears out of the boundary layer and keeps them toasty warm in winter. Good luck


12

This answer covers an assessing and visually undamaged helmet, the answer by @Craggie that covers how to inspect for damage. This study indicates that the helmet is almost certainly safe to use. MEA and collaborator Collision Analysis collected 1,500 used helmets from consumers and eliminated any that showed damage or did not have date of manufacture ...


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