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56

It is possible, but only in certain conditions. I live in a tropical country, so, 20 degrees centigrade is considered cold here. My conmute to work is almost flat, with only one climb, something a very steep 300 meters. If it were not for that, I'd be able to get to the office almost completely dry. What's the trick? I use a hardtail mountain bike with a ...


40

Several questions, several answers: Is there a temperature above which you don't ride Yes, for me that's about 45°C. At that temperature where I live (Australia) the air is usually so hot that even wearing glasses it's hard to blink often enough to keep my eyeballs from drying out. Wrap-around glasses, complete skin coverage, and riding slowly is the only ...


32

Everyone else has offered good advice, but let me point out one simple thing for you: Almost no matter how hot it is or how hard I'm riding, I'm not really sweaty until I stop moving. That's because 1) I'm wearing bike clothes designed to wick moisture and evaporate it quickly, and 2) almost no matter what the weather is doing, while I'm moving I'm headed ...


26

Even a short sprint or uphill effort can make a big difference in how sweaty I am when I get to the office. Maintain a consistently low effort, using low gears for any uphills. Panniers are good, since backpacks and messenger bags not only insulate, but also hold your shirt directly against your sweaty back. Often I'll put my shirt in my pannier and just ...


23

Lets get this in perspective. 36˚C is one degree less than normal body temperature. When our body temperature rises above normal (37˚C) we are at risk of Heat Exhaustion. Since one of the symptoms of Heat Exhaustion is mental confusion, it can quickly become Heatstroke. Heat stroke is fatal in up to 80% of cases. Factors that increase the risks (see the ...


20

Try searching for the term "ear band". They tend to be thin enough to comfortably wear under a helmet, and the good ones are fully wind-resistant, yet breathable. If you have an open ventilation-style helmet, I recommend a helmet cover as well, which is a fabric sleeve that stretches over the top of the helmet which also significantly cuts wind passing ...


18

I took a pretty quick look at the map, but I'm going to make a kind of general suggestion: If this is a trip that you're only used to traveling by motor vehicle, you might fall into the trap of thinking that the route you're used to is the only route available. Bikes can go lots of places that cars can't, and lots of places that cars just as frequently don't....


16

I live in Southern California: if I didn't ride when it was hot I'd never ride. My suggestion is to hydrate way more than you think you'll need to. And I like to wear long sleeves of white moisture-wicking technical fabric. It keeps the sun off you and therefore keeps you cooler. And take more frequent stops to drink and eat a banana to replenish ...


14

Oftentimes, you sweat the most just when you finish the ride, as you've just been pedaling at full effort, but you don't get the wind generated by the moving bike. And then you need to stand around in a warm space, like I need to wait in the very warm freight elevator lobby. Try to take it easy especially for the end of the ride, and hold something cold (...


14

What worked for me in an admittedly flat terrain - I used a heartrate monitor. In my spare time I calibrated it a bit - at which heartrate do I get sweaty? Then on the trip to work, I make sure that I stay about 5% below that rate. At 45, my sweat heartrate was about 110, so I stayed below 105. My trip is 21 km in each direction.


14

when I pressed the rear brake lever, the wheel stopped turning immediately, despite the slight pressure if it locked up with only slight pressure, either your brakes lack modulation, or it had really poor traction. The first (modulation) is generally adjustable. The second depends on your tyres, the road surface, possibly oil/petrol/diesel spills, loose ...


14

I have a thin material tube that can be used for a lot of things. Also called a headsock or necksock or a buff. I wear mine around my neck, with the top edge at my mouth/nose, and up over my ears at the back. The lower edge rides on my shoulders and slightly over my collarbone. Some buffs have a split on both sides and cover the top of the chest a bit....


12

This is an unconventional answer but it works for me. I have an aero TT helmet that has fairings over the ears. The reason the fairings exist is to reduce my head's aerodynamic drag, but in doing so, it also takes my ears out of the boundary layer and keeps them toasty warm in winter. Good luck


11

I have actually commuted in a very dangerous, hilly, bike un-friendly city (Tegucigalpa, Honduras). Here there are zero facilities for bike commuters, no racks on public transport, no bike parking anywhere and of course, no showers at workplace. I have tackled the problem with following strategies: Leave home with plenty of extra time. When you travel to ...


11

if I wear the same clothes and just go for a walk/jog, then my feet stay dry for much longer Do you have mudguards (fenders) on your bike? If not your feet are in the spray from the front wheel and will get wet unless you wear over-boots. Or gumboots. For cycling when the roads are wet mudguards make a huge different to your comfort. You'll stay dryer ...


10

Bike tires are treaded to grab on customers rather than the road. Obviously, different tread patterns will perform differently off road, that is: on earth, mud, gravel, sand, roots.. BUT - contrary to popular belief - on the road, whether it is concrete, tarmac or asphalt, treads will do nothing except offer a slightly slower ride and at the same time, less ...


10

No. It absolutely isn't. You know what happens when an umbrella catches the wind. Imagine that on an unstable device doing 30 mph. Even without wind the rain will be blowing in your face most of the time so you'd have to place the umbrella right in front of you for it to offer any kind of effective shielding from the rain. How are you supposed to ...


10

It's no problem, but there are a few things to consider: Keep all the moving parts well oiled. Note that even if you only ride on roads there will be more dirt getting on it, so you'll need to give the chain a good clean, let it dry, and oil it. This should stop the mechanicals getting too rusty, some screw heads will rust but not too badly. Wet rims don't ...


10

This is a matter of some debate. The New York Times article "Does Hot Weather Cause More Bike-Tire Problems?" by J. David Goodman (July 22, 2010) may be of interest. The claims in support for hot weather causing problems are that the tubes may be running higher pressure than designed, or the rubber softening making it more permeable. I, like many others, ...


9

The general consensus I've seen is that you should expect to be cold for the first twenty minutes of cycling in the winter. If you're dressed warmly enough that you're not cold for the first twenty minutes, you'll swelter. If your ride is under twenty minutes (this is just ballpark), you can simply dress warmly and remove clothes once you arrive at work. ...


9

No. Cycling while holding something in your hand is inherently dangerous. You have much less control over the bike and you can only operate one of the brakes. You can buy various contraptions for attaching an umbrella to a bicycle. There's also the Uberhood: However, this got a poor review in The Guardian Bike Blog: once open atop the bike it refused to ...


9

Basically, getting "sweaty" is a function of the temperature, humidity, clothing, level of effort, length of exercise, and your personal propensity to sweat. If you're dressed lightly enough, the weather is not too bad (below 75F and maybe 60% humidity), you travel only a short distance (maybe 2 miles max) on relatively level ground, and you maintain a ...


9

"No-sweat cycling" is a much talked about art that will never be perfected. Luckily, you don't have to be perfect to make riding to work in your work clothes a viable option. I do it several times a week (in NYC, over a bridge), some days finding more success staying sweat-free than others. A couple keys: Weather is a big determining factor. If it's ...


9

The main thing that would determine whether or not a particular brand or style of shoe cover will help would be the closure around your ankle, above the top of the shoe. A standard, non-cycling over-shoe or shoe cover like those made by Totes and other manufacturers will usually cover most of the shoe, but the opening is wide and water will run down your ...


9

I would suggest shoe covers, which look like a boot and cover the ankle. Or wear mid-calf or knee length socks and roll the upper part down for double or triple coverage on the ankles. Or, mini ankle warmers :-). Pics of my Pearl Izumi MTB overboots. The sole is exposed so walking is possible. (Not a product recommendation, just what I happen to own.)


9

Living in Sweden, I know what you're talking about. Because I like wearing a hat for any temperature below 10°C (50°F) and it can be -20°C (-4°F) in the winter, I have a special hat for usage under my bicycle helmet. For the warmer days I just use a thin buff, which I can always keep in my pocket due to its limited size. For the colder days I ...


8

Living in Denmark, I have ridden a bike almost every day of my life since I turned 5. I do not claim to be any kind of expert, I just see biking as an every day rutine. I ride my bike to work every day. I break into sweat real easy in the summer, when temperatures often rises above 20 degrees C if not in shorts, which I cannot wear to work. So how do I ...


8

I wanted to disentangle a few concepts here as most discussions around tire tread and wet conditions have typically been in regards to hydroplane/aquaplane, which other answers have correctly indicated is not a general problem for bicycles. While tire tread is not needed to prevent hydroplaning, tire tread can still play a role in traction, explicitly ...


8

A lower saddle will compromise your riding comfort at all other times. Instead you should have unweighted the saddle and put your backside further backwards to weight the rear wheel. Also, were you braking on the straight only? Or were you braking into the turn? In the dry we can get away with a lot of bad behaviours like braking while turning, that ...


8

Carbon fiber road bikes are generally perfectly capable of being ridden on less than perfect surfaces without sustaining damage. Obviously you want to avoid large obstacles such as potholes, rocks, kerbs etc. 28mm tires are definitely a good idea. Depending on how much poor quality surface you plan to ride on, you might want to consider looking for a '...


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