New answers tagged

2

Sometimes I inadvertently try to "grab" the pedal with my foot. This usually happens when riding with flat pedals and when I am insecure. For example, spinning high cadence, slippy pedals, wearing flip flops, and scary descents. This grabbing leads to fatigue, muscle pain and cramps. Maybe something similar is the source of your pain. Since you ...


2

Inserting standard disclaimer about accepting medical advice from the Internet; this is based largely on what I learned from my physiotherapist when rehabbing after an accident. Replying strictly to your question about pain in the foot that is held in the down position, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that you're not making a conscious effort to rest your ...


2

Leftaroundabout nails it - in addition this sounds like a time when technicque needs to be updated. You might try ghost pedalling, where you turn the cranks over but not fast enough to push the bike. Another idea might be to descend like a racer, where your weight is spread between two feet and some weight on the hands, and almost no weight is on your sit ...


-3

Ligaments hold all your organs in place, you may find that the nerve ending is on the receiving end of those ligaments. A basic way to look at it, the boys in ww2 on the landing craft would get terrible stitches and vomit not from sea sickness but from there organs being held in place while there bodies and knees would be bounced around in the rough sea. You ...


4

It's generally a good idea to change position regularly (at least slightly) during any ride. If you get used to just one position, your body learns to keep that position no matter what, and it'll do that by stiffening up if the bumpy descent tries to shake you out of it. But stiffening is the worst thing you can do in such a situation: it'll cause the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included