99

"Optimal" cadence varies with what you're trying to optimze, so your question doesn't have a simple answer. Freely-chosen Cadence vs. a Targeted Cadence A recent review by Hansen et al. summarizes what is currently known about factors affecting choice of cadence. In particular, they conclude "[d]uring high-intensity cycling, close to the maximal aerobic ...


46

Copied this from a BikeRadar article: How to measure your own sit bones Of course the measure you really want is between the centres of your ischial tuberosities – the pointy lower parts of your pelvic bone on either side. Many bike dealers have a pad that you can sit on to measure this distance, but you can do it at home too. Take a piece of aluminium ...


22

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


17

I know this is an old thread but it's the top one on Google and I found it helpful. I tried all the methods above and I didn't have a lot of luck so I wanted to share what I tried. I made some playdough using the first no cook recipe I found on Google (it was fun and doesn't take long). I then put it between two pieces of cling film and pressed it to about ...


17

First off, unless you aspire to be a professional racer (or at least a highly competitive amateur) ignore the advice that you "must turn at least 90 rpm" or whatever. Secondly, even if you DO have such aspirations, you're not going to do well by trying to achieve a high cadence right from the start -- it's something that you must develop slowly. With ...


14

I do not buy the stressing argument, any sprint out of the saddle will stress many parts of your bike much more. I would only be concerned with your stability during that mount and the risk of a fall in harder terrain when running. And the issue of possible slip of an unclipped left foot from a clipless pedal that may not support an unclipped foot enough - ...


12

I'd wager the two biggest reasons you don't see foot-sized pedals are the increased rotational weight, and the difficulty you would have catching the pedal with your foot before it struck the ground or the front tire. I'm sure someone tried this once and promptly scrapped the idea after the foot-sized pedal struck something. Pedals need to be stiff and ...


10

For downhill and all forms of trail riding (freeride, enduro, all mountain etc) the prefered way is 1 finger (index) on each lever. Anything else can be dangerous. If the brakes are not powerful enough for dealing with this then they either need fix or replacement to proper brakes for this type of riding. Also, riders position the levers closer to the stem (...


10

I've used this method which worked well: Fill a large size ziploc bag with icing sugar. Icing sugar's fine texture means that it binds together when compressed. This is what we want - it will hold the shape of your buttprint after you get up. Close the bag making sure to squeeze out the air. Place on hard chair. Sit while assuming the degree of forward ...


9

Here's a link to a video that may help you: In this technique all you need is a piece of corrugated cardboard and some chalk.


9

People tend to think of fit as something for which there is a single solution, i.e., a particular combination of frame size, seatpost height, stem length, and so forth, all of which will create the optimal size bike for them. In reality, it isn't that straightforward; proper fit can be achieved within a range of values. For example, I have a few different ...


9

Of course, you will have less control over your bike if you don't hold the handle bars, especially if something unexpected happens (like a truck coming out of nowhere at full speed for example). Regarding sitting upright, you are very lucky to be able to keep your back straight like that, most people have a bad posture, and are not comfortable sitting ...


9

I really think this is a fit issue (e.g., changing the bar height and/or reach, how you hold the bar) rather than finding softer grips or padded gloves. Numbness should be taken seriously (as it can lead to permanent damage if left unattended). Padding tends to help deal with issues associated with high frequency vibrations, rather than too much pressure ...


8

Similar to the other answers it would be worthwhile getting a professional to assess your current bike fit (and potential modifications that may be required). If possible I would suggest a sports physiotherapist that specializes in bike fitting. They exist, I have used one before. A physio will be best qualified for assessing how changes in position can ...


8

Yes, recumbents are good for your back, and backside. They provide support for the length of your back, which may be as little as a tailbone paddle, or right up to your shoulders. The longer seats generally have the option of incorporating a headrest/neckrest too. Getting the angle of seat and neck right is significantly important in your comfort. ...


8

When riding on the hoods reducing the reach of bars is equivalent to using a shorter stem. Only when riding on the tops a shorter stem will lead to different steering compared to shorter reach bars. A change of 2 cm to 3 cm will change steering. However, it is not so dramatic that you will hit the dirt right away. Especially on gravel bikes that typically ...


8

Whether they work: Short answer yes, they do not have major widespread problems. Most problems that do occur are related to undertightening the bolts on them to start with, or adjusting them without following the right sequence (on the ones with the out-of-view bolt underneath the extension) or without proper torque or lubrication. Most of them are designed ...


7

Yes, there is hope for skinny people like us. Please keep in mind that sitting on a saddle for miles/hours on end is never going to be totally comfortable. I'm sure I will get flamed for this but I'll go ahead and state it- there is no such thing as a comfortable saddle. Saddle choice is a matter of mitigating discomfort, not enhancing comfort. The two most ...


7

It is a little hard to tell from your photos, but do you have grip shifters? For setups with grip shifters, the grips are generally much shorter / narrower, as part of the "grip surface" is the shifter itself. If you do indeed have grip shifters, you can do as ojs suggested & move the shifters / brakes in towards the stem, or, you could return the ...


7

It's likely you can fix this by making the handlebars higher and possibly moving them back towards you. That means a new stem, which is probably something you can fit yourself. This is the part I'm talking about (photo from the manufacturer website). If you have a 5mm allen key you can remove that stem by undoing all four bolts you can see here, plus the ...


7

In my experience it may be a lack of core strength. So you end up leaning on your arms more, to try and lighten the load on your mid-torso muscles and lower back. Try moving around more at work, a standing desk might help. Some stretches throughout your work day and before riding too. If you don't wear cycling pants, consider getting some. They offer ...


7

The main issue with the posture images you included (shown again below) is that both positions represent extreme positions and both are likely problematic, despite one being labeled as correct. The image on the left has put the back into hyper flexion, over-recruited the lower abs and tilted the pelvis backwards, this position will likely cause breathing and ...


7

You are correct that a leant-forward riding position will naturally tend to make a rider support some of their weight with their arms and hands. The more rotated forward the rider is, the more weigh the arms tend to have to support - which is one reason tri-bars have forearm rests. Good core strength is what allows a rider to take weight off the arms. ...


6

You may also want to look into getting some thicker padded cycling pants. Amazon has some decent padded pants that may give you a bit more protection when riding. This may also sound stupid, but have you fit yourself on your bike? Even slight adjustments up/down and forward/back on your seat of handlebars can totally change the way yours arms and butt feel ...


6

I look at it the other way - what's the required number of fingers to maintain a hold of the handle bars. On a sealed road it's close to 0, leaving 4 for braking. In a serious rough/rocky track, it might take four, leaving none for the brakes (along with praying it smooths out soon). Lose the handle bar, you lose brakes and steerage - there's only one way ...


6

I think this should be possible, as long as your wife is happy in the navigator position and you are OK with being the bug-shield. Having the larger person on the back is difficult, but may be possible with unusual designs. I'm always banging on about how important bike fit is and a tandem is no different. Do make sure you try as many as possible before ...


6

I've purchased a couple of used leather saddles. The ones that were barely used or just broken in were fine, but there was one well-used one that was the exception. Its sit bone area was visibly lower on one side than the other, enough that it was the likely cause of an SI joint dysfunction for me. I'd say if it looks relatively new and close to the ...


6

As others have said, just because the bike shop says it's a good fit, doesn't make it so. Their incentive is to sell a bike off the floor so they'll find the one that fits best and sell it to you. I got a custom fit and I have longer thighs than most people. This meant that to get the seat position right, I had to have my saddle further back from the pedals ...


6

We cannot tell you what size cranks you need. Perhaps someone has direct or similar experience to help you with. If not, here's my advice ... In order of preference Talk to the rehabilitation people who (I am guessing) helped with the knee replacements. Find out if they can advise you on this, or if there is a sports physiotherapist (or similar) that they ...


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