95

"Optimal" cadence varies with what you're trying to optimze, so your question doesn't have a simple answer. Freely-chosen Cadence vs. a Targeted Cadence A recent review by Hansen et al. summarizes what is currently known about factors affecting choice of cadence. In particular, they conclude "[d]uring high-intensity cycling, close to the maximal aerobic ...


35

Copied this from a saddle mfg website: How to measure your own sit bones Of course the measure you really want is between the centres of your ischial tuberosities – the pointy lower parts of your pelvic bone on either side. Many bike dealers have a pad that you can sit on to measure this distance, but you can do it at home too. Take a piece of aluminium ...


17

First off, unless you aspire to be a professional racer (or at least a highly competitive amateur) ignore the advice that you "must turn at least 90 rpm" or whatever. Secondly, even if you DO have such aspirations, you're not going to do well by trying to achieve a high cadence right from the start -- it's something that you must develop slowly. With ...


16

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


12

I'd wager the two biggest reasons you don't see foot-sized pedals are the increased rotational weight, and the difficulty you would have catching the pedal with your foot before it struck the ground or the front tire. I'm sure someone tried this once and promptly scrapped the idea after the foot-sized pedal struck something. Pedals need to be stiff and ...


10

You have a few options here. You can get a two-legged kickstand. These are primarily used with heavy touring loads, but they will help stabilize the bike when parking with an uneven load. The two legs fold up into each other when you disengage the kickstand. You generally cut these with a hacksaw to shorten them to the appropriate length. I used one for a ...


10

For downhill and all forms of trail riding (freeride, enduro, all mountain etc) the prefered way is 1 finger (index) on each lever. Anything else can be dangerous. If the brakes are not powerful enough for dealing with this then they either need fix or replacement to proper brakes for this type of riding. Also, riders position the levers closer to the stem (...


9

I don't think you have a problem here. Physiologically, your thighs are the engine room of your legs. They are designed for endurance and power and can keep working at a high output for extended periods of time. Your calves are more for short bursts of power, such as jumping or sprinting. They can't sustain high power output for any length of time. In ...


9

I know this is an old thread but it's the top one on Google and I found it helpful. I tried all the methods above and I didn't have a lot of luck so I wanted to share what I tried. I made some playdough using the first no cook recipe I found on Google (it was fun and doesn't take long). I then put it between two pieces of cling film and pressed it to about ...


9

People tend to think of fit as something for which there is a single solution, i.e., a particular combination of frame size, seatpost height, stem length, and so forth, all of which will create the optimal size bike for them. In reality, it isn't that straightforward; proper fit can be achieved within a range of values. For example, I have a few different ...


9

Of course, you will have less control over your bike if you don't hold the handle bars, especially if something unexpected happens (like a truck coming out of nowhere at full speed for example). Regarding sitting upright, you are very lucky to be able to keep your back straight like that, most people have a bad posture, and are not comfortable sitting ...


9

I really think this is a fit issue (e.g., changing the bar height and/or reach, how you hold the bar) rather than finding softer grips or padded gloves. Numbness should be taken seriously (as it can lead to permanent damage if left unattended). Padding tends to help deal with issues associated with high frequency vibrations, rather than too much pressure ...


8

You can do it on any surface which will conform to the shape of your butt, like a piece of memory foam. Sit on it, with your knees higher than your seat by 4-6 inches, then measure the center of the depressions left. There are different types of memory foam, and some will have a more durable impression than others.


8

Similar to the other answers it would be worthwhile getting a professional to assess your current bike fit (and potential modifications that may be required). If possible I would suggest a sports physiotherapist that specializes in bike fitting. They exist, I have used one before. A physio will be best qualified for assessing how changes in position can ...


8

Yes, recumbents are good for your back, and backside. They provide support for the length of your back, which may be as little as a tailbone paddle, or right up to your shoulders. The longer seats generally have the option of incorporating a headrest/neckrest too. Getting the angle of seat and neck right is significantly important in your comfort. ...


7

It could be due to your bike fit, but there's a lot of power in your quads, and if you will note a lot of pros (very noticeable track) cyclists have large quads. I think this might help you, it shows what muscles are responsible for what part of a pedal stroke: http://imgur.com/QFYRPdV https://njcyclestudios.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/power.jpg


7

There is a technique known as "toeing". Basically, as you turn the crank with your feet your toe angles up and down -- up at the top of the stroke and down at the bottom. This makes use of some of the strength/energy of the calf muscles. But to do this well you must be riding with the ball of your foot on the pedal (generally implying toe clips or "...


7

I've used this method which worked well: Fill a large size ziploc bag with icing sugar. Icing sugar's fine texture means that it binds together when compressed. This is what we want - it will hold the shape of your buttprint after you get up. Close the bag making sure to squeeze out the air. Place on hard chair. Sit while assuming the degree of forward ...


7

Yes, there is hope for skinny people like us. Please keep in mind that sitting on a saddle for miles/hours on end is never going to be totally comfortable. I'm sure I will get flamed for this but I'll go ahead and state it- there is no such thing as a comfortable saddle. Saddle choice is a matter of mitigating discomfort, not enhancing comfort. The two most ...


7

It is a little hard to tell from your photos, but do you have grip shifters? For setups with grip shifters, the grips are generally much shorter / narrower, as part of the "grip surface" is the shifter itself. If you do indeed have grip shifters, you can do as ojs suggested & move the shifters / brakes in towards the stem, or, you could return the ...


7

It's likely you can fix this by making the handlebars higher and possibly moving them back towards you. That means a new stem, which is probably something you can fit yourself. This is the part I'm talking about (photo from the manufacturer website). If you have a 5mm allen key you can remove that stem by undoing all four bolts you can see here, plus the ...


7

In my experience it may be a lack of core strength. So you end up leaning on your arms more, to try and lighten the load on your mid-torso muscles and lower back. Try moving around more at work, a standing desk might help. Some stretches throughout your work day and before riding too. If you don't wear cycling pants, consider getting some. They offer ...


7

You are correct that a leant-forward riding position will naturally tend to make a rider support some of their weight with their arms and hands. The more rotated forward the rider is, the more weigh the arms tend to have to support - which is one reason tri-bars have forearm rests. Good core strength is what allows a rider to take weight off the arms. ...


6

Here's a link to a video that may help you: In this technique all you need is a piece of corrugated cardboard and some chalk.


6

Whatever works. The main advantage of the standard drop bar is that it offers you multiple hand positions and multiple postures. In a sprint, or driving into a headwind, riding fully on the drops cuts wind resistance, but for less intense riding one of the several hand position on the top bar or on the hoods is usually preferred. And on long rides the ...


6

A fresh piece of corrugated cardboard on a hard surface such as a coffee table. Sit down and try to mimic the upper body position you have on your bike. Your sit bones change position based on how your pelvis is tilted. Your sit bones should crush the corrugated cardboard slightly and leave two indentations. Measure center to center as best you can.


6

Penny-farthings are known for their relatively harsh ride, and lack of stability. There is no option on many frames to replace the saddle, although there were some that you could. I would get a sprung Brooks saddle, or similar, which might add a bit of comfort without significantly sacrificing the vintage look. It will add a bit of suspension effect as well....


6

I look at it the other way - what's the required number of fingers to maintain a hold of the handle bars. On a sealed road it's close to 0, leaving 4 for braking. In a serious rough/rocky track, it might take four, leaving none for the brakes (along with praying it smooths out soon). Lose the handle bar, you lose brakes and steerage - there's only one way ...


6

You may also want to look into getting some thicker padded cycling pants. Amazon has some decent padded pants that may give you a bit more protection when riding. This may also sound stupid, but have you fit yourself on your bike? Even slight adjustments up/down and forward/back on your seat of handlebars can totally change the way yours arms and butt feel ...


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