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28

Unfortunately, most bikes are only rated to 300lbs or less. However, if this is a new bike, you should take it back to the shop and get them to fix it. They can't claim they didn't know you were a heavy rider when they sold you the bike. You might need to get more substantial wheels with more spokes. Wheels designed for touring bikes might be more ...


28

Not enough points to comment, so here is an answer instead, based mostly on my own experience. I've been using a bike as my main, if not sole, mean of transportation for the last 20 years or so. During that time, my weight changed a lot (from 80 to 130kgs (176 - 286 lbs)). When I was 80, I nearly never broke a spoke (maybe once per 10 000km), and only after ...


27

You shouldn't ride on a wheel with broken spokes more than necessary, especially if its a low spoke count wheel (like a 16 spoke wheel). The load gets unbalanced with respect to the other spokes. Since this is a front wheel, I wouldn't risk riding it. If something does happen to the wheel (such as failure) its far more serious than if it happened to the ...


27

Adding threads to any sort of bolt under tension doesn't actually make it much stronger, beyond the first ≈5 threads. Adding more basically just adds dead mass; either way the whole thing will generally fail somewhere close to the first thread. So, filling the bore with threads wouldn't have any benefit. What it would do however is move the expected point of ...


25

Spokes bent like that can't take any load (tension), so it would not work. However, bending multiple spokes around each other can produce a feasible wheel with non-straight spokes, like the last photo here. Note that in this particular wheel a single broken spoke will cause multiple others to lose tension, most probably rendering the wheel unrideable.


19

I suggest you get the wheel rebuilt properly, once and for all (probably by a different bike shop). A well-built wheel should be able to handle even riding off kerbs or small unavoidable potholes without breaking spokes. You should unweight the saddle and take the weight on your feet, but even if you don't it should survive an occasional hit. A hybrid like ...


16

Spokes break for the same reason any other material does: they are subject to stresses they are unable to withstand. In the case of a wheel, it can be overloaded by rider weight, cargo, or forceful impacts. Additionally, the presence of loose spokes results in other, properly tensioned spokes bearing more of the wheel's load. Spokes are under tension, so ...


15

To me, it looks like whoever (or whatever, as it was likely machine built) used the wrong size tooling to hold and screw the spoke nipples as the wheel was built. Not a rim manufacturing defect but a wheel building defect. If it's still under warranty, I'd get the wheel replaced. Any cracks are bad cracks and could propagate. If it's not under warranty, I ...


14

Lower spoke numbers are primarily of interest to weight weenies (though for a given price, a lower spoke wheel will probably use a heavier rim offsetting the spoke reduction weight savings). As usual, Sheldon is some good reading. There is also a whole book on how to build wheels well and design decisions, by Jobst Brandt, called "The Bicycle Wheel". What ...


13

Spoke washers are used at the hub end, between the flared out cap and the hub itself. The intention is to take up extra length between the bend and the end, to help prevent the spoke from breaking. Common use is on hubs with thin flanges (for lightweight or because they're cheap) and on heavier loaded bikes to spread the load. Notice how the lower spoke ...


13

The bore guides the thread of the spoke to the threading of the nipple allowing easier spoking with less risk of cross-threading. The bore also allows the spoke to be threaded deeper w/o adding more threading to the spoke. Imagine you want to thread the spoke all the way into the nipple. If there wasn't a bore, but the inside thread of the nipple would ...


11

A wheel could theoretically be trued by tension alone if you started with a perfectly manufactured rim, hub, spokes and nipples and you were building a perfectly symmetric wheel. The reality is that there are minute differences and that tolerances are not all that tight. Not to mention that ultimately the wheel has to go into a frame that also may not be ...


11

That is poorly built and unacceptable (in my book) as a paid for product. If all of the spokes are protruding some, and several more than others, it means that the wrong length spokes were used. The reasons for this may or may not be the wheelbuilders fault, it's possible that some component of the wheel build had incorrectly listed sizing and the spoke ...


11

I have to say I think this is a myth, for a properly built wheel. Spokes have threaded ends which the nipples screw onto. Like almost all screw threads, they are self-locking. Since the spokes of a properly built wheel are under a high level of tension, there is no "play" in the threads. In addition, any torque would have to overcome the high clamping force ...


11

Usually spokes don’t break because they are too weak but because they have too low or uneven tension. Even tension will distribute the load among several spokes. High enough tension will make sure that spokes are never unloaded completely since spokes should always be under tension. When a spoke is unloaded it can come loose or rub against the hub or other ...


11

I completely agree with the accepted answer of @David Richerby from personal experience. As a heavier rider (~22 stone) for many years, I also found with a couple of different bicycles that the rear wheel tended to come out of true, especially when hitting bumps and potholes. My solution was to replace the rear wheel with a touring wheel with more spokes, ...


10

A well built wheel should go years without needed truing. If you are truing the wheel every 2 months something is wrong with the build. There's no way to know via the internet, but my guess is that it's one of two things. The rim is bent slightly and requires significantly uneven tension in the spokes to get the rim true. There isn't enough tension in ...


10

This topic is really poorly understood. Anyone who ever who tells you it's fine to just round up or round off when choosing spoke lengths hasn't been through the disaster scenarios that can be caused by it, or perhaps doesn't remember because the experience is too painful and embarrassing. Rounding up can cause you to run out of threaded length before the ...


10

The grooves/enlargement shown at the hub are all normal. The path to a wheel that doesn't break spokes is use premium quality spokes (DT, Sapim, and Wheelsmith are the usual poster children), set their line properly at the rim and hub, and stress relieve them properly during building. Fatigue breakages are almost universally the result of one or more of ...


10

There is one major cause of this problem and it is putting a 1.8mm aka 15ga spoke in a 2.0mm/14ga nipple. This mismatch will screw together and hold under some tension, but then slip. It is easy to test. Obtain a known 15ga nipple. If it can screw on to your spokes at all, it confirms the problem. The same thing could happen with a 2mm spoke in a 2.3mm ...


9

Yes, straight pull spokes are technically superior to traditional J-bend spokes. The only reason that J-bend spokes are relatively more popular is because it's cheaper to machine a hub with simple flanges on a lathe. Well-designed straightpull hubs typically cost more. Note that a straight-pull spoke in generally can and should be tensioned higher than ...


9

A typical spoke has around 8-10 mm of threading on it, and you don't necessarily have to engage all of it with the nipple. So it's not super sensitive to small variations in length. For most folks, too long or two short really doesn't matter as long as it's within about 2 mm, so just round to whichever stock size is closest to ideal. If you go beyond the ...


9

First congratulations and encouragement for getting out there on the bike. Don't get discouraged, the problem is fixable. I totally agree with other answers saying get the wheel rebuilt with new spokes. I'd go with heaver gauge spokes as well. Although this will cost some money it's likely the most cost-effective option in the long run. I'd make some ...


9

Crossed spoke lacing is primarily necessary to transmit torque from the hub to the rim, rather than for increased strength, although I suspect hub flanges have more strength when loaded by a crossed spoke. Given a trailer wheel will carry a lower load than a bicycle wheel this does not matter.


8

Place a single leading spoke and a single trailing spoke- both on the same side of the hub- to get your placement correct. That way you only have to unthread two spokes if you're off. Once you've got it right, unthread the leading spoke if you're planning on lacing trailing first or vice versa and proceed as normal with lacing.


8

I've heard before that a smaller wheel is actually stronger, and this site states the following. Because a 26-inch wheel has a smaller circumference than a larger 700c wheel, the rim is structurally stronger and resists deformation from impact. Wheels that are 26 inches excelled at handling hard drop-offs and even crashes without losing their true. The ...


8

There are two things I generally do to help eliminate most of the twist. When tightening spokes, get in the habit of slightly overturning and then turning back. (i.e. If I want to tighten a spoke 1/2 turn, I'll do 3/4 and 1/4 back. ) At regular intervals once the wheel is "close", take the wheel out of the stand and place the wheel vertically on a soft ...


8

Simple idea - turn the wheel over in the truing stand. The low side of the rim should move to the other side. If the Right-hand side is still low after flipping, your gauge is out and needs calibrating.


8

I don't know what kind of air pump you were using at the gas station. If it was a manual one with just a pressure gauge attached, you can usually use them if you are careful enough. Automatic air pumps, however, usually have the habit of using this three step algorithm: 1) open the valve to fill some air for a fixed amount of time, 2) measure the effect, 3) ...


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