Hot answers tagged

34

Not answering your actual question, but this might be useful to you. To get a bike through narrow or awkward spaces, hold the handlebars and pull it up onto its rear wheel so it is pointing straight up. It relatively easy to balance a bike like this and push it around on its rear wheel while holding the handlebars. In this orientation it's about as wide as ...


34

Warranties exist to protect you, the consumer, against defects in materials or workmanship, not against deliberate damage. The purpose of a bike lock is to help avoid your bike being stolen, so if it has prevented a theft of the bicycle then it has done its job well. Perhaps you can ask Decathlon and report back to us by answering your own question for ...


27

Take the lights and anything else thats likely to be stolen off your bike. For things that can't be removed easily, you may want to use something like Pitlock security skewers (or security bolts) or glue in ball bearings or similar into the head of the bolts (which will make them hard to remove when you need to remove them, but a casual thief can't remove ...


26

That sucks. I'm sorry that your bike was stolen. If thieves are willing to break into a locked garage, break into a locked and fully enclosed mesh bike parking area then cut two bike locks using power tools: there's not much you can do about it. If there are lots of bikes in the bike parking area you can make your bike a lower priority target by increasing ...


23

Buy more secure lock(s) for your bike - I have a Kryptonite New York Standard and a Kryptoflex cable that I leave in work for my commute. I also have a New York Fahgettaboudit Mini for using about town on my single speed (no quick release installed on this bike). Utilise new/better lock from above to secure your bike in a more productive fashion. Personally ...


23

A cheap ring lock like the one pictured below can be defeated in less than one minute with a screwdriver. Furthermore, even a good ring lock (one that that isn't easily broken and might take a few minutes to defeat with a screwdriver) has a fundamental and fatal flaw - the thief can simply pick the bike up and put it in the back of their truck or van. A ...


22

This depends a lot on the city; different cities allow you to lock up to different things, and have different crime rates. For example, I've been to major European cities where a lot of the bikes were happily locked where they would have been stolen in minutes in New York City. I'd first start by removing things that could be easily stolen (lights, ...


19

Bicycle Theft, Guide No. 52 (2008) gives details around bicycle theft in different variants, stages and from different perspectives, contains reference for theft data. From the report: Offenders Not all bicycles are stolen for financial gain. Some offenders may take a bicycle simply to get from one place to another, and then abandon it. Research ...


17

I would guess that hard evidence is going to be difficult to come by -- doing anything resembling a controlled experiment would be enormously expensive, and cyclists are too disorganized (by this I mean lacking unified organizational structure) to do some sort of sampling-based measurement or epidemiological study. I would just observe that, in my opinion, ...


17

Some locks offer "insurance" where you can get a payout if their lock fails to protect your bike. Of course there are caveats like "lock must be used" and "thief must leave lock behind" (for inspection for weakness) and so on, and even "lock must be registered with company" The only places that can tell you details would be the supplier and the ...


16

I'm a lifelong cyclist, including big cities like SF, Oakland, Baltimore, DC, Atlanta, etc... And I've worked in a few bike shops so I've heard several stories. Basically, there are 2 kinds of bike thefts: Crimes of opportunity. Meaning, if a thief thinks they can sell it for $20 or more and they think they can get away with it. These folks will steal ...


16

In terms of accessories like lights, GPS, etc. the only way to be safe is to remove them entirely. Remember that if something is quick-releasable for you, it's also quick-releasable for thieves. Bike lights will frequently get stolen even if they aren't easily removable, because they're valuable. There is an assortment of "anti-theft" bike accessories ...


16

I know you said 'I'm not going to find my bike', but it is definitely very helpful to figure out the spots where bike thieves try to sell your bike on. I have retrieved more than one stolen bike that way! In Amsterdam there is a service every Wednesday (in different locations) where you can let the number of your bike be registered and they will engrave it ...


15

Some of what does and doesn't work, based on two great sources: a study in Montreal, and the USDOJ's COPS program's paper on bike theft prevention: What Works: Adequate Locks I won't discuss the matter in detail since it's not part of the question, but adequate locks and locking technique are the most important method of prevention for most people. Both ...


15

There's no way to 100% secure everything, but there are things you can do to make it more difficult or time-consuming. Don't lock up your bike. Bring your bike with you instead of leaving it outside. Mine goes into my office. Choose a location where you or other people will see thieves messing with the bike. Not a super-high traffic area (in that case ...


13

A few years ago in Toronto, what was probably one of the biggest bike theft busts ever happened. Igor Kenk was trading drugs for stolen bikes, and stockpiling them by the thousands. (Supposedly he was planning to corner the market post-econopocalypse or post-ecopocalypse and be a king). Anyways, you can see pictures or the thousands of bikes that he stole: ...


13

It is effective against certain kinds of bike theft, particularly if you already lock up your bike effectively every single time (which is a good assumption if you're willing to go through the trouble to uglify it). Many people swear by it. For example, LDS missionaries in Taiwan repaint their new bikes poorly as a matter of tradition. As Daniel already ...


13

According to campus police reports (apparently backed by video surveillance), an organized gang of bike thieves operates in my area using techniques like this. They use the following system: A few "spotters" stroll around the campus and pick out the $1500+ bikes. An hour or so later, a different thief, dressed in coveralls etc. comes by and cuts the locks ...


12

The motive is to steal the whole bike. Since you cannot ride back without pedals or chain, they expect that you will leave the bike locked but unattended at night so they can finish up stealing it without much interference.


12

It still doesn't hurt to contact the manufacturer, but do not talk to as if they owe you anything. Do an open inquiry and see if there's anything they can do. Companies can actually do things out of the ordinary and isn't only bound by warranties. Maybe they'll want your lock back to examine how it survived a theft and give you a replacement.


11

As for the Kryptonite, cutting one side an bending is certainly possible, but in reality if you can cut one side, you use the same tools to cut the other. The tools needed to bend the link after cutting one side are almost certainly not portable, and why would you carry two tools when one will do. In comparison to the D-lock--if you can cut though 18mm, you ...


11

The point of the National Bike Registry, and similar schemes, isn't so much to prevent theft as it is to make it (sometimes) possible to recover a bike after it's been stolen. Police departments do recover a lot of bikes; but, since it's usually impossible to trace ownership, most of them end up in police auctions. The bike registries help to solve this ...


11

To determine if the bike is indeed yours, you could contact the seller and ask for more information about the bike and for more pictures in the hope that you'll get one with a visible identifying mark. You'll need to be careful. If the seller know's it's stolen asking for more information and pictures could tip them off that you are the rightful owner with ...


11

There's nothing you can do if the storage area is not under constant surveillance. It can take as little as 2 minutes to grind a U-Lock. The only real solution is to keep your bike in your apartment. In the meantime, check to know how the thief was able to get in that area ? did he came via the garage door ? the front door ? Did he enter while someone ...


10

Occam's razor says that you should try the simpler/null hypothesis first, in this case that your tube wasn't stolen. There are two alternate hypotheses that you should test: 1) Are you sure that you had one in the first place? Perhaps you were running tubeless and never knew it? 2) Are you sure the tube is actually gone? One thing that can happen (either ...


10

I successfully keep a cheap old bike in a theft-prone area. I'm on my second in 4 years because the first deteriorated, not because it was stolen. I use a good D-lock (it cost about as much as the bike, that is £/$/€30-50) through both chainstays to a bike rack. This secures the back wheel as well as the frame. The front wheel has a cheap cable lock ...


10

I lost a few bikes to theft when I was in university. It stunk. I took to buying used bikes (probably from bike thieves). I wrapped the frame tubes of my (otherwise nice) bike in peelable masking tape, then smeared them with grease. Nobody wanted that ugly bike. It worked to prevent theft; I kept that one for many years.


10

Funny enough, the parking garage may actually be less safe than a well-exposed outside location. When I was commuting between the cities of Hamburg and Berlin I locked my (500/1000$) bikes at the train stations, sometimes for weeks. I made sure to detach and lock my front wheel together with the back wheel and frame though, on some steel pole or railing, ...


9

For quill stems, you can use a rubber cement to glue a ball-bearing into the socket on the stem bolt, making it so you can't get at it with an allen key. You'd obviously want to use a glue that can be removed with a solvent, so that you'd be able to do regular service.


9

Perhaps you might swap your current quick-release skewers by one of the many "anti-theft" alternatives (listed in my perceived order of security): Pitlock (www.pitlock.com): these require a special shaped key to open. You carry the keys with you, and no thief could take the wheel. Neither yourself if you lose the damn key; Velo Orange anti-theft skewers: a ...


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