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0

Adding a little info on specific assumptions made in the question I can ask them to replace the rear wheel. A lot more cost, as the cassette needs to be transferred and this would open a can of worms, the cassette is over ten years old and maybe should be replaced too As others have pointed out, removing and installing a cassette is routine and easy ...


8

Your rear wheel needs to be replaced or completely rebuilt with all spokes being replaced. To a first approximation, materials have a limited lifetime - the cyclic loading will eventually cause them to fail. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatigue_limit While the steels used in most spokes in theory can last an infinite number of cycles if the load is ...


15

Unless the cost of a new wheel that's suitable for you plus any other repairs the bike might need is greater than what the bike is worth to you, than the answer by far is get a new wheel. Folks in your weight range who ride a lot tend to need an especially strong and reliable aftermarket wheel. The stock advice is to get a handbuilt one. The reason for ...


5

Criggie has done an excellent job of taking the original post pictures and modifying them to show how the derailleur should be aligned. Looking at the derailleur exploded diagram at the bottom of this answer - part number 2, mounting bolt - and then looking at the picture in the original post the mounting bolt has been replaced with what looks like a sawed ...


7

That's one seriously chopped-around bike. I see a bolt holding the rear derailleur on, on an axis that would normally pivot. This means your B tension is non-existent or infinite depending on the gear chose. I also see the hanger well out of position and missing its other bolt. That means the derailleur is at a funny angle. Attempted `shopping below: ...


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I postulate that the larger offset of the non drive side is unable to add additional stiffness vs. the 20mm offset of the drive side because the wheel must be in equilibrium. Any additional offset of the non drive side must be compensated for by looser spoke tension, anyway, giving no benefit. This is where your thinking is going wrong. The emphasized ...


0

Good question. The only reason I can think of is that the average spoke tension of a narrow symmetric rear wheel (i.e. same spoke angle on both sides) would be higher. Wouldn’t this increase the compression force on the cross-section of the rim? What’s strange is that on classical wheels nobody is really taking advantage of the lower non-drive side forces. ...


4

The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brandt touches on this: Some rear hubs that have done a version of this include the Ritchey Zero or Z-hubs. The road Zero hub had a 21.3mm center-to-right flange measurement and 28.6 center-to-left, so combined with a 3.65mm or so offset rim it was dishless. (It didn't need an asymmetrical frame, but moving in the left dropout is ...


2

The main point is probably history: When chain-driven bikes were invented, they were single speed, only. The rear triangle was symmetric just as the rear wheels were, as the single sprocket didn't take up much space and could fit easily into the gap between the frame and the spokes. Then people realized that it would be good to have a number of different ...


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