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2

Glad you are having fun on your bike! Here's a link to adjusting the rear derailleur -- it's worth a look if only to gain some insight into the RD's settings and perhaps what might go wrong. OTOH, you might be able to fix/adjust it yourself :) https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailleur-adjustment Before working on the RD, it's a good idea to ...


4

ah, a person after my own heart. Confirmed yes, it works, it's real, and it's fantastic. I have 3x9 setup, with the exact same RD. 22-32-44 up front, 11-46t in back. That's a range of 836%. With a measured 52mm tire and 165mm cranks, that's 13.8 gear inches. It's pure uphill loaded touring bliss. My experience was that 11-40t works fine with the road ...


2

When people put in wider than stock pulleys, one possible outcome is the chain winds up getting jammed between the tension pulley and the cage. That can result in a destroyed derailleur and/or frame. This may not be common per se, but I've seen it enough that I'm very conservative about never using anything but the original thickness.


3

I was able to rotate the grooved tube 180 degrees with a flat screwdriver wedged into the groove. I cleaned the area and applied a bit of Crazy Glue around the tube. The shifter cable is now in contact with the unworn part of this tube and excessive friction in the system is gone.


3

That hole is for the outer plate stopper pin, one component of part number 8 in the EV diagram linked in the other answer. It prevents the pulley cage from pulling out of the derailleur body.


1

As correctly stated by @ Renaud, your derailleur has a max rear cog of 36 teeth. In practice, however, it can handle larger cogs in most situations with 42 teeth likely being the absolute most it can handle. The issue is getting enough space between the upper jockey wheel of the derailleur and the largest cogs so that the derailleur's jockey wheel doesn't ...


1

The cage and it's pulley wheels look fairly straight up and down...so close that it shouldn't be an issue with shifting, although this is a game of millimeters and one can't absolutely rule out an alignment issue from a single photo. One thing I do notice is that the photo appears to show the upper, jockey wheel doesn't seem to be directly under the cog ...


1

The RD-M786-SGS is rated for a big sprocket of max 36T, so if you want to follow strictly Shimano specs, no. That being said, Shimano has high standards and is very conservative, so it is possible that it works. I personally just installed on my bike a Microshift 9sp 11-42T cassette (no goatlink) on an Acera RD-M3000, rated for 36T max (I had to adjust the B-...


4

When it's a 10-speed bike involved in this situation, here is the calculus: If someone put a cassette spacer on the trainer wider than the proper 1.85mm 10 to 11 speed conversion spacer, it causes this problem because then the small cog is out further than the RD high limit screw is set for it to be. If the trainer does have a 1.85mm spacer and still doesn'...


-3

I used to have, not a click, but a creak, from the rear wheel. The background of the problem was that I bought an e-road-bike. Because decent e-road-bikes were not available with 36-spoke wheels, I had to purchase a bike having 28-spoke wheels. I thought that because the rear wheel is the most likely wheel to have issues and because the frame was an ...


1

It does seem to be in time with your pedalling. If this is the case in any gear, then it would indicate the issue is in the pedals, crank, bottom bracket area. Check it isn't the front derailleur cable clicking on the right hand crank... rule out the easy one first! The mudguard too, anything that could be rubbing that shouldn't. Then you would check the ...


1

The skipping may come progressively often because you apply progressively more power (higher gears). I assume you are trying the smaller cogs at similar speeds. Chain length may be an issue, but most likely the issue is the cassette. If your old chain skipped a lot, it is almost sure that it abraded a lot of of material from the cassette, especially when ...


2

When you are on the largest chainring and largest sprocket the rear derailleur should look very extended. Some movement should still be possible. It should shift freely from second largest to largest sprocket and you should be able to e.g. push the chain to the chainstay. On the small-small combination the derailleur shouldn’t be completely folded, i.e. ...


5

The cassette does not look worn out A cassette that is worn does not look worn. It'll skip anyway despite not looking worn. I suspect your cassette is simply too worn. (Interestingly, for chainrings the opposite is true: a chainring can look very visibly worn due to the non-even wearing at different crank orientations, and still work.) The new chain barely ...


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