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4

Others are mostly suggesting alternatives, but I think you deserve the answer to the option you asked about. Yes, there should not be any problem with doing that change. It should work perfectly fine, you will just need a longer chain. I have this Sora with 11-32 on my road bike and I do not think the steps are unbearably large. My main bike even uses the ...


0

50-39-30 chainrings with the existing GS variant mech Total Capacity: 37 teeth or less Largest sprocket 27T Smallest sprocket 11T Chainwheel tooth difference: 22 teeth or less. Big/Big of 50:27 and little/little gear of 30:11 is a total chain difference of (50+27)-(30+11) or 36 teeth. Nominally you're at Shimano's posted limit for that mech However I ...


4

You have several options depending what is important to her, I am presuming cost is a factor. 11-34 cassette with new derailleur and chain (given cassettes and chains are consumable) is cost effective, but it does mean the jump between gear changes increases. If she does not need the higher gears then there are ways to bodge a cassette of say 14-34 that ...


4

It's there to reduce friction when the derailleur is in its extreme positions and also to prevent contamination of the housing. It's not totally necessary, but if it's broken in a way where it can't do that anymore, replacing it will improve performance. It's unfortunate that the first generation Shimano road 11 rear derailleurs were built to need them to ...


-2

Most likely you are fine to leave it as-is. It is actually not housing but rather the housing end cap with tongue. The theory of the tongue is that it will prevent dirt ingress to cable housing, thus keeping your shifting reliable over time with no need to change the cables and housings regularly. Long time ago, road bikes used end caps with O ring on the ...


2

Might be shorter to list what you can keep: Frame and fork(probably, if the OLD spacing is the same) Front wheel Bars and stem Saddle and seatpost Pedals Brakes. You will need to buy or source replacement: Rear wheel hub because a freewheel and a cassette are too different. And its a sad truth that a whole-new wheel might be cheaper than a hub and ...


4

If your goal is to convert your 3 gears in the front and 7 gears in the back to a 3 in the front and 9 in the rear this will be quite expensive. A new rear wheel will be required Your current rear wheel uses a screw on freewheel to mount the rear gearset. Nine speed rear wheels use a freehub mounting system with a cassette. You will need a 9 speed rear ...


1

This is a partial answer. What else you will need: a rear shifter, your Shimano ST-EF41 will not be compatible with SRAM-X9 (as far as I know). On the other hand, SRAM and Shimano 9-spd cassette/chains should be interchangeable, so if you can (virtually) upgrade your Tourney 7-spd to something 9-spd Shimano, you should be able to then replace this something ...


2

Grip the clamping plate edges top and bottom with vise-grips, water pump pliers or the like and wriggle it. It may even come loose if the bolt is entirely removed.


6

I would back off the bolt in a manner similar to your second image. With a small screw driver pry the clamp away from the derailleur toward the head of the bolt. When the clamp is free, you will notice a small "nub" protruding from the derailleur. The purpose of this nub is to prevent the clamp from rotating when it is tightened. My guess is your ...


1

No mechanical part is perfect in real life. There's a tolerance for everything, which means that your two identical model hubs may actually be slightly different dimensions. We are talking about a few tenths of a millimeter at most, but it only takes that much misalignment for your shifting to start feeling off. Make sure your cassette is properly fastened. ...


2

The inside of the barrel adjuster should screw into- and out of the derailleur when you turn it. The part around it should only slide lengthwise but should turn with it (there is a slot which allows it to slide lengthwise but ensures they turn with each other). In my experience the Ultegra R8000 barrel adjuster has an unusually fine thread and needs quite a ...


1

Regarding the barrel adjuster: it only has a few turns of adjustability before its parts unscrew from each other (the inner part is keyed to the derailleur body). You probably need to detach the cable, remove the barrel-adjuster parts, and put them back together. When you reassemble everything, you can't use the barrel adjuster to compensate for much ...


1

My experiences here differ from some others. I have 2 sets of wheels from the same brand (hunt) 1 700c aero 25mm and 1 650b fat 38mm gravel. Both disc but the gravel wheels with a 11-34 and the aero wheels with a 11-30. Moth mechs were med-cage (GS). Originally 1 was Tiagra now its 105 5800. The other 105 5800. Absolutely no disk rub or shifting issues.


1

There isn't really a coherent RX600 groupset. Basically GRX is a glossy re-marketing exercise for a bunch of different parts from different sources The RX400 rd is a repurposed Deore T6000 and designed for 32-36t cassettes. It would shift both 10 and 11 speed road perfectly but it's not a good choice when you hope to fit narrower cassettes, it's much more ...


6

The min large sprocket size that Shimano specifies for the RD-RX810 is 30 teeth. A 28 might work ok but I’d personally stick with 30. As others have mentioned swapping wheels is not plug and play. The disc rotor and cassette end up in slightly different lateral positions which requires derailleur and caliper adjustments. Using identical model hubs should ...


8

My experience with swapping wheels is disappointing. I had to adjust the derailleur (limit screws, cable tension) and rim brakes (due to slight difference in rim width and dish) every time I swapped wheels. Maybe if you have exactly the same hub and rims on both wheels it will work better. I think my derailleur adjustments were necessary because the cassette ...


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