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1

Z7 is one of if not the only 7-speed specific chains still made. It won't work right on 8-speed.


1

The 7700 is higher quality when new than a new Claris derailleur . In particular jockey wheels are sealed bearing and more durable than those on cheap r/ds sold today. http://www.disraeligears.co.uk/Site/Shimano_Dura-Ace_derailleur_7700_GS.html A new rd might be better than a worn out old one with worn out jockey wheels (which you can replace), but ...


2

There are lots of things in the Shimano specs that are listed that aren't necessarily limits but may simply correspond to their product range. For example, there is no inherent difference between a 10, 11, or 12-speed MT derailleur, but: 10-speed MTB gears when introduced were typically 11-36t cassettes with a front triple chainset such as 40/30/22. 11-...


2

Maximum front tooth difference is an invented spec that Shimano has begun using to attempt to present compatibility data to consumers in a way they think will be simpler or more effective or whatever. Maximum front tooth difference contains zero information not already present in the total capacity number. For example, if you take an RD with a listed max ...


0

According to the Deore XT RD-M8000-SGS Long specs it should work (you are right at the limit though, but they are known to be conservative). No need to change the crank/chainrings (but you can if you want to).


0

7700 was a 9-speed groupset. at that time, the cable-pull ratio was standardized, such that any 6- to 9-speed shifter, including your Claris, should work perfectly. If your shifting is only "so-so," I might look for alternative explanations. so, as far as performance is concerned, they should both work equally well. it's hard to even say what would ...


2

It is not directly connected to the difference between the front chainrings. Instead, a Rear Derailleur will have a "capacity" which is the total amount of chain it can take up before bottoming out. The RD also has a value for the small cog (often 11 tooth) and either a maximum-sized cog, or some of the new specs give a maximum and a minimum tooth ...


3

@mdabbs Since this happened to me several times now, and the only answer I got was 'you have probably mounted it wrong' :-) I decided to figure out how it could happen. The reason was a lot simpler than expected. My chain was a bit too short, so when I am on the big chainring and switching gears down to the next-biggest or biggest cog on the cassette, the ...


0

Check the derailleur hanger alignment, and that the derailleur is mounted properly without the bolt being cross-threaded. You can check the derailleur alignment by eye. Pick up the back of the back of the bike and look down the line of the top run of the chain. (This can also be done with the bike upside down). The derailleur cage should look like it is ...


3

10 Speed Shimano uses a different cable pull and cassettes have a different cog spacing, so you would need to change the cassette and shifter to go to a 10 Speed derailleur. Going 2 over the maximum difference is unlikely to cause problems with Shimano and they are fairly forgiving. I would not worry about changing chain rings if its been working. If you ...


4

Yes, this can happen as a result of variance in how hard the QR is tightened causing variance in the alignment of a replaceable rear derailleur hanger. Typically this relates to lack of precision in the manufacture of the hanger and/or dropout and consequent poor fit of their interface. Sometimes by taking the hanger off and studying the interface you might ...


10

You need to adjust the L-Limit screw - Have a look at this Park Tool guide. The problem may also be a bent derailleur hanger. Checking and, if needed, fixing this is best done with a specialized tool, and is quick and easy if you have that tool. While it is possible to make the check and repair without the tool, the precision is nowhere near as good. This ...


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