40

The single-legged fork must truly withstand heavier bending forces than conventional forks, simply due to physics and asymmetricity. But because of its different construction, the fork is actually stiffer than most 2-legged. Pros The top is attached like a dual crown downhill fork, which is much stiffer than a single-crown. The wheel axle is one-piece with ...


13

return the bike to Cannondale as there is a welding fault in the area north of the front part of the frame If true, that bike is probably not safe to ride. If the shop showed you where the problem is, posting a picture of that area would probably be useful. For what it's worth, if the shop that sold you the bicycle says it has an unsafe frame, I'd tend to ...


9

As mentioned in comments you most likely applied the brake without the disc between the pads. The pistons advance and do not return all the way to their original position - this is how hydraulic brakes automatically adjust for pad wear. The pistons can be pushed back in. Remove the pads then use a tire lever to push the pistons back in. Then replace the ...


9

It's a 2014 Synapse Womens 5 105


7

My experience with Lefty goes back to 2000 when I purchased my Cannondale Super V. One thing I've liked about it how easy it is to 'turn off'. There's a small dial at the top that disengages the suspension - good when transitioning onto solid road riding. As mentioned above by another post, the center of balance is altered. The implication of which is ...


7

The CAAD 12 uses sealed cartridge bearings which are replaceable and not proprietary. You shouldn't need many special tools to service the headset bearings, especially if they are new - you should be able to tap them out and remove the necessary parts with a screwdriver or wedge. However, if you are asking the question because you are concerned with home ...


7

As others have said the bike may not be safe to ride. A frame failure when riding can cause a nasty crash. Don;t ride it. You must return the bike. It's faulty and dangerous. I think there are some issues with what Evans cycles have told you to do though. I think you are saying they told you to work with Canondale directly to return the bike and get a ...


6

It's not clear what is actually bent. From your picture, it is obvious what isn't bent: your fork is perfectly straight from the crown down to the drop outs. Also, the boot which covers the stanchion seems to be quite suggestively aligned with the fork; the bend seems to occur at the top of the boot, just before the head tube. If so, then it is in fact the ...


5

Pro: You can run oversize and plus size tyres on a lefty.


5

Like everyone, the first time I saw this fork I find it obvious that it must be weaker than conventional forks... Until I realized that conventional forks are not symmetrical at all. One side is the spring (air or metal spring) and the other side is the damper. This means the sides are always working against each other. The fork is teared a on its sides and ...


5

I have a Cannondale Supersix Evo and I've had issues with tires rubbing in that exact spot. The frame will accommodate a 25mm tire, but the clearance is very tight, so you really have to pay attention to keeping the wheel trued up. I've also found that the stock wheelset (Mavix Aksiums) flexed enough when I'm cornering hard to cause a little rubbing even ...


5

Since it's a few seconds with an allen key to pop the stem off and have a look at the inside of the head tube, I suggest doing that. Strongly suggest. If there's any damage to the fibres, or the cracks go deeper than the gel coat, don't buy the bike. If you don't know what that means, or the seller won't let you look, don't buy the bike. Exposed fibres or ...


5

I managed to find a couple of similar frames on web search that suggest the 1987 Vintage Cannodale identification could be correct. The really unique way the top-tube intersects the downtube before the head tube makes me think this is a very small frame. I would suggest it's a 1987 SR600 in 48cm


5

With all frames, that much of a dent increases the risk of a failure eventually. If that were an ultra-light frame with very thin tubes, it might be better to retire that now, but an earlier model Cannondale probably doesn't qualify. You could certainly retire the frame if you want, but another option is to keep an eye on the dent and to watch for cracks ...


4

No, they are not reliable in the long term. I have the same problems with a Ultra fatty dlr Headshok on my cannonade Caffein 2006. Bought in 2008, it worked one year, then leaking oil, air and finally corroded , to function as a "stiff" fork... I had it repaired at a german hedshok repair specialist, called"team88", they replaced the whole air suspension ...


4

None of the other answers deal with the OPs desire to keep the bike inside the car, i.e. not on a rack. To put the bike in the car, you have to take off at least one of the wheels. Pedro sells a "chain keeper" which is designed to keep the chain on or near the derailleur when the rear wheel is off: This should help you considerably (along with old towels ...


4

Pro: There is no "fork," so mud and other hub-bub will not get stuck in the front as much.


4

You have friction shifters so you don't need to worry about shifter compatibility -- any derailleur can be shifted with a friction shifter provided the shifter pulls enough cable to get through the range of required shifts. So, all you need to worry about is the capacity and extreme cog sizes. I'd just buy some Shimano derailleur like a Shimano Acera one ...


4

As 83cannondale alludes to, this was an unusual derailleur that, unlike most others, did not use a cable housing and the frame has no cable stop for it. So you'd need to get a clamp-on cable stop along with whatever conventional derailleur you used (and some derailleur cable housing). These clamp-on stops are available through the usual auction sites and ...


4

All frames flex to some extent due to impacts or road shocks or vibrations. Some frames are better at absorbing this than others. All frame designers engineer their frames to attenuate these imperfections in riding conditions appropriately (for control/comfort reasons) by varying the size/shape of tubes and their compositions SAVE is Cannondale's marketing ...


4

If you are expecting a number, sorry can't give one. However these are the variables you will have to consider Bike - some bikes shimmy at high speed. This can be caused by minor unbalancing like a yellow spoke reflector, or a small variation in rim weight and balance. Wind speed and direction - side gusts have a greater impact at speed. Traffic - Cars ...


4

It's been said that you're the limit, rather than the bike, so this is about how to safely approach that limit. Purely as a point of comparison for what the manufacturer might exist a typical cyclist to do, on my not dissimilar hybrid (but v brakes) I've done over 60km/h down a hill I know well. 50+ is more common. Road bikes will be faster but ...


4

That bike has rear flat mount. If there's room for a post mount caliper plus adapter, which from looking at some pictures I doubt there is, the rear post mount adapter of the right size is your part, something like: If there's no room then you need a flat mount caliper instead.


4

The only answer to this is to go to the store where you bought the bike and ask. IMHO: seems derailleur hanger failing to protect the chain stay seems like a possible cause for a warranty claim.


4

Generally fat bikes seem to have the bars at about the same height as the saddle, which the Fat Caad complies with. If you personally want the bars a little higher that's fine. The Caad stem length is quite short so it has limited potential for raising the bars. Riser bars in conjunction with a different stem will help.


4

Are you physically near the seller? The single best thing you can do is go see it, inspect it closely, and then get a leg over the bike. Test Ride That way you'll know instantly if its a "no-way" fit bit sitting over the bike. A good seller will let you take it for a ride too. Ideally an hour, with some mixed surfaces, and a small climb/descent to get ...


4

There are certainly parts which are specific to certain brands of frames, and to specific models too. Examples: Aero seat posts. Being non-round, they could be any weird shape, which has aerodynamic advantages, but also lets the frame maker copyright their profile, so that there are no cheaper alternatives. Integrated stem/bar combinations - same as ...


4

Do you use the front derailleur? It seems many people in reasonably flat areas do not. If not, you are riding a 7 speed. Take a ride and notice what gears you are using, particularly on the steepest climb and the steepest descent. The lowest gear will be with the smallest chainring in the front and the largest cog in the back. The highest gear will be ...


3

I would start with the biggest knobbly tires the frame and wheel will take. It came with a 28 mm. I doubt there is enough clearance to put a mtn 2.2 on it but even a 35 mm or 38 mm is big step. In knobby a 35 mm will be sold as a CX. Run the tires at less than maximum pressure unless you are over like 180 lbs. Those slicks are not the correct tires anyway....


3

Wider tires are the first thing to try. The BadBoys are basically rigid mountain bikes with 622mm wheels and narrow tires, so you could also put on mountain bike sized wheels and very wide tires. With a second set of wheels, it's easy to change between road and off-road riding. About suspension forks, with current geometry there isn't much room for the ...


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